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Armstrong 
State * 
College 



1983-1984 
CATALOG 



11935 ABERCORN STREET 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

31406-7197 




HIGH SCHOOL 
PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE 



Based upon a careful review of the high school curriculum and public college 
admissions requirements, the State Board of Education and the Board of 
Regents recommended the following courses as being essential for success in 
college: 



Course (Units) 

English (4) 

Science (3) 

Mathematics (3) 
Social Science (3) 

Foreign Language (2) 



Instructional Emphasis 

-Grammar and usage 
-Literature (American & World) 
-Advanced composition skills 

-Physical Science 
-At least two laboratory courses 
from Biology, Chemistry, or Physics 

-Two courses in Algebra and one 
in Geometry 

-American History 

-World History 

-Economics and Government 

-Skill-building courses emphasizing speaking, 
listening, reading, and writing. 



Additional courses selected from the following are also strongly recommended: 

Trigonometry 

An additional laboratory course in science 

A third course in a foreign language or study in a second foreign language 

Fine Arts (art, dance, drama, music) 

Computer Technology 

Physical and Health Education 

Typing 

For information on specific prerequisites related to given majors, students 
should consult college catalogues and their high school counselors. 



A Senior College in the 
University System of Georgia 




5, tjgffnma 



College 



11935 ABERCORN STREET 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

31406-7197 



1983-1984 



Accredited by the 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

Commission on Colleges 

— Reaffirmed December, 1982 — 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



From the President 

This Armstrong State College catalog con- 
tains policies, regulations, academic programs, 
and general information about our college. 
While this is useful information, it will not pro- 
vide you a feeling for the exciting Armstrong 
educational experience. Only living it will. 

Acting President 



Contents 



Academic Calendar 


i 


History, Purpose, Programs 


1 


Admissions 


1 


Academic Regulations 


1< 


Fees 


2< 


Financial Aid 


2< 


Student Services and Activities 


3: 


Degree Requirements 


3( 


Degree Programs 


4: 


Undergraduate Faculty 


15i 


Undergraduate Index 


20' 



Special Notice 



The statements set forth in this Catalog are for information purposes only and should not b 
construed as the basis of a contract between a student and this institution. 

While the provisions of the Catalog will ordinarily be applied as stated, Armstrong State Colleg 
reserves the right to change any provision listed in this Catalog, including but not limited t 
academic requirements for graduation, without actual notice to individual students. Every effo 
will be made to keep students advised of any such changes. Information on changes will b 
available in the Offices of the Registrar, the Dean for Student Affairs, and the academic deans, 
is especially important that students note that it is their responsibility to keep themselve 
apprised of current graduation requirements for their particular degree program. 

Armstrong State College is an affirmative action/equal opportunity educational institution an 
does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, age, creed, or national origin in employmen 
admissions, or activities. The College does not discriminate on the basis of physical handicai 



THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 



Institutions of the University System of Georgia 

h — On-Campus Student Housing Facilr 
Degrees Awarded: A — Associate; B — Baccalaureate; J — Juris Doctor; 

M — Masters; S — Specialist in Education, D — Doctorate 

cD — Doctorate offered in cooperation with a University System university. 

with degree awarded by the university 

Universities 

Atlanta 30303 



Athens 30602 

University of Georgia — h; B,J,M,S,D 
rtlanta 30332 

Georgia Institute of Technology — h; B.M.D 

Senior 

Jbany 31705 

Albany State College — h; B.M 
,mencus 31709 

Georgia Southwestern College — h; A.B.M.S 
ugusta 30910 

Augusta College — A.B.M.S 
arrollton 301 18 

West Georgia College - h; A.B.M.S 
olumbus 31993 

Columbus College — A.B.M.S 
ahlonega 30597 

North Georgia College — h; A,B,M 
>rt Valley 31030 

Fort Valley State College — h; A,B,M 



Georgia State University — A.B.J. M.S.D 
Augusta 30912 
Medical College of Georgia — h; A.B.M.D 

Colleges 

Marietta 30061 

Kennesaw College — A.B 
Marietta 30060 

Southern Technical Institute — h; A.B 
Milledgeville 31 061 

Georgia College — h; A.B.M.S 
Savannah 31406 

Armstrong State College — A, B.M 
Savannah 31404 

Savannah State College — h; A.B.M 
Statesboro 30460 

Georgia Southern College — h; A.B.M.S.cD 
Valdosta31698 

Valdosta State College — h; A.B.M.S.cD 



bany 31707 

Albany Junior College — A 

lanta 30310 

Atlanta Junior College — A 

linbridge 31717 

Bainbridge Junior College — A 



• Locations ol 
Universities 
and Colleges 




Junior Colleges 

Barnesville 30204 

Gordon Junior College — h; A 
Brunswick 31 523 

Brunswick Junior College — A 
Cochran 31014 

Middle Georgia College — h; A 
Dalton 30720 

Dalton Junior College — A 
Douglas 31 533 

South Georgia College — h; A 
Gainesville 30503 

Gainesville Junior College — A 
Macon 31297 

Macon Junior College — A 
Morrow 30260 

Clayton Junior College — A 
Rome 30163 

Floyd Junior College — A 
Swainsboro 30401 

Emanuel County Junior College — A 
Tifton31793 

Abraham Baldwin Agri. College — 
Waycross31501 

Waycross Junior College — A 

University System of Georgia 

244 Washington Street, S.W. 

Atlanta, Georgia 30334 



h; A 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Academic Calendar 





Fall, 1983 

(11 WNkl) 


tflnUr, 1984 
(11 WNkl) 


Spring, 1984 

(11 WNkl) 


Summer 

(7 WNkl) 


1984 
(9 w« 


Registration 


Sept. 19,20,21 


January 3 




March 26 


June 18 


Ju 


First Day of Classes 


Sept 22 


January 4 




March 27 


June 19 


Ju 


Mid-Term Examinations 


Oct 26-28 


Feb 6-8 


Apr 


30-May2 


July 11-12 


July 1 


Last Day to Withdraw 


October 28 


February 8 




May 2 


July 12 


Jl 


Early Registration and Advisement 


Oct.31-Nov 11 


Feb 6-17 


Apr 


23-May4 


July 16-28 


July 1 


Last Day of Classes 


December 2 


March 13 




June 4 


August 6 


Augi 


Reading Day 


December 3-4 


March 14 




June 5 


August 7 


Augi 


Final Examinations Begin 


December 5 


March 15 




June 6 


August 8 


Augi 


Final Examinations End 


December 6 


March 19 




June 8 


August 10 


Augi 


Graduation 








June 8 




Augi, 


Holiday 


Nov 24, 25 








July 4 


J 


Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (ISAT) 


Sept. 10 


Dec 3 




March 10 






Basic Skills Examination (BSE) 


Sept. 9, 14 


Dec. 22 




March 19 


June 11, 25 


July 2, 
23, 30, A 


Diagnostic Tests (Eng. & Math) 


Sept. 9, 14 


Dec. 5, 22 




March 19 


June 11,25 


July 2, 




Oct. 17 


Jan. 30 




April 16 




23, 30. A 


College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 


Oct. 13. 14 


January 20 




April 20 






Regents' Test Application Deadline 


October 4 


January 17 




April 10 






Regents' Test Administration 


October 25 


February 7 




May 1 






General Orientation Sessions 


September 19 


January 2 




March 26 






CHAOS Orientation Sessions 


July 7, 14,21, 












28, August 4 



Board of Regents 

Ivey, O. Torbitt, Jr. Chair Augusta 

Bishop, Julius Athens 

Candler, Scott, Jr Decatur 

Coody, Rufus Vienna 

Divine, William Albany 

Dodd, Marie W Atlanta 

Frier, Thomas Douglas 

Gignilliat, Arthur Savannah 

Hill, Jesse, Jr Atlanta 

McMillan, Elridge Atlanta 

Plunkett, Lamar Bowdon 

Robinson, John, III Americus 

Skandalakis, John Atlanta 

Smith, Sidney Gainesville 

Summer, Lloyd, Jr., Vice Chair Rome 



College Commissio 



Victor, Irving 

Beall, Y.A., Jr. 
Bell, Joseph 
Kole, Kay 
Ranitz, John Jr. 
Stegall, John 
Bargeron, Saxon 
Etheridge, Ronald 
Rousakis, John 
Stephenson, Bill 
Young, David A. 
Burnett, Robert 
Groach, Maureen 



Chain 



Secretary 
Treas 



PRINCIPALS 



Staff of the Board 



Crawford, Vernon Chancellor 

Propst. H. Dean Vice Chancellor 

Neal. Henry Executive Secretary 

McCoy, Shealy Vice-Chancellor- 

Fiscal Affairs and Treasurer 
Dunham, Frank . . . Vice Chancellor-Facilities 
Jordan, Howard. Jr Vice Chancellor- 
Services 
McDonald, Thomas Vice Chancellor- 
Student Services 
O'Rear, Harry Vice Chancellor- 
Health Affairs 
Pounds, Haskin Vice Chancellor- 
Research and Planning 
Cleere, Ray W Vice Chancellor- 
Academic Affairs 

Cannon, Robert Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Affirmative Action 

Carmon, James Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Computing Systems 

Cheek, Wanda K Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Planning 

Funk, Gordon M Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Fiscal Affairs 

ickman, Mary Ann ' Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Academic Affairs 
Jenkins, Guy Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Facilities 

loiner, Robert Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Communications 

dann, Thomas E Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Facilities 

dosshart, Roger Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Fiscal Affairs 

pchwarzmueller, E. Beth Assistant 

Vice Chancellor-Research 

Vamsley, Jacob H Assistant Vice 

Chancellor-Fiscal Affairs 



Officers of Administration 

Burnett, Robert Acting President 

Stegall, John . . . Vice President for Business 

and Finance 

Adams, Joseph Dean, School of Arts 

and Sciences 

Anderson, Donald Dean, College and 

Community Services 

Buck, Joseph Dean, Student Affairs 

and Development 
Nash, Charles . . . Dean, School of Education 
Norsworthy, Gary . . . Dean, Joint Continuing 

Education Center 

Repella, James Dean, School of Human 

Services 

Baker, Richard Director of Plant 

Operations 

Groach, Maureen Director of Finance 

Harris, Alvin Director of Student 

Activities 

Herring, Ellen Director of Personnel 

Hunnicutt, George Registrar 

Miller, Thomas Director of Admissions 

and Recruitment 

Morrison, Margaret Director of Computer 

Services 

Prosser, Arthur Director of Business 

Services 

Sandy, Gerald Director of Library and 

Administrative Services 

Winters, James Director of Financial Aid 

and Veterans Affairs 

3enson, Lynn Counselor and 

Psychometrist 

Cox, Patrick Counselor 

Kemp, Karen Career Development and 

Placement Counselor 

Prevatt, Leslie Coordinator, Continuing 

Education 

Smyth, Rencie Coordinator, Short 

Courses 

Vacant Coordinator, Public 

Information 






ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



History of the College 

Armstrong State College was founded on 
May 27, 1 935, as Armstrong Junior College, by 
the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savan- 
nah to meet a pressing need for a college in 
the community. The college was housed in the 
Armstrong Building, a gift to the city from the 
family of George F. Armstrong, and over the 
years built or acquired five additional buildings 
in the Forsyth Park and Monterey Square 
areas. The college, as Armstrong College of 
Savannah, became a two-year unit in the Uni- 
versity System of Georgia on January 1 , 1 959, 
under the control of the Regents of the Univer- 
sity System. In 1 962, the Mills B. Lane Founda- 
tion purchased a new campus site of over 200 
acres located on Abercorn Extension. The 
new campus, with eight new buildings, was 
occupied in December, 1965. 

In 1964, the Regents conferred upon Arm- 
strong the status of a four-year college, with 
the right to offer the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of 
Business Administration. The college now 
offers more than twenty major programs lead- 
ing to baccalaureate degrees, and, in addition, 
the two-year associate degree in a number of 
academic areas. 

The academic community includes approx- 
imately 3,000 students and 1 65 full-time faculty 
members. Armstrong State College was fully 
accredited as a senior institution by the South- 
ern Association of Colleges and Schools in 
December, 1968, with accreditation retroac- 
tive to January 1 , 1 968, and was last reaccred- 
ited in December, 1982. 

Purpose of the College 

Armstrong State College is a multi-purpose 
institution offering degree programs in the 
health professions, human services, liberal 
arts and teacher education. Graduate pro- 
grams are also available in selected academic 
areas. As a service to the community, it also 
provides a continuing education program for 
those who have nondegree objectives. The 
College strives to maintain the flexibility and 
adaptability which activated its growth and 
change of status in less than thirty-five years 
from a small city-supported junior college to a 
senior college in the University System of 
Georgia. Therefore, the College defines its 
present purpose in the following terms: 

to provide a professional staff and modern 
facilities in an environment that promotes the 
free exchange of ideas; 



to bring each student to a better realization 
of his own intellectual, emotional, and spiritual 
potential by providing academic programs in 
the humanities, natural sciences, and social 
sciences; 

to develop the student's technical and ana- 
lytical skills through programs leading to pro- 
fessional degrees in a number of areas, includ- 
ing Health Professions, Criminal Justice, Social 
Work, and Teacher Education; 

to offer opportunities for continuing educa- 
tion through symposia, conferences, institutes, 
and courses unrelated to degree programs; 

to make available the full resources of the 
College through involvement in research proj- 
ects, public service activities, and other pro- 
grams sponsored by the community. 

Accreditations 

Armstrong State College has earned the fol- 
lowing regional and special purpose accredi- 
tations: 

Armstrong State College - by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools for the 
period 1982-1992. 
Associate Degree Nursing - by the National 
League for Nursing for the period 1977- 
1985. 
Criminal Justice - by the Criminal Justice 
Accreditation Council for the period 1 981 - 
1991. 
Dental Hygiene - by the Commission on Ac- 
creditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary 
Educational Programs for the period 
1979-1984. 
Health Information Management - by the 
Committee on Allied Health Education and 
Accreditation for the period 1 981 -1 984. 
Respiratory Therapy Department - by the 
Committee on Allied Health Education and 
Accreditation for the period 1 983-1 988. 
Teacher Education Programs - by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education for the period 1 982-1 989. 

Two- Year Degree Programs 

The following two-year degrees are offered 
as preparation for higher degrees in the liberal 
arts and professions or as terminal profes- 
sional degrees: 
Associate in Arts 

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice 
Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 
Associate in Science in Health Information 
Management 






PROGRAMS 



Associate in Science in Nursing 
Associate in Science in Radiologic 

Technologies 
Associate in Science in Respiratory Therapy 

Four- Year Degree Programs 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of art, drama- 
speech, English, history, music, political sci- 
ence, and psychology 

Bachelor of General Studies. 

Bachelor of Health Science. 

Bachelor of Music Education. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, 
chemistry, computer science, criminal justice, 
and mathematical sciences. 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors 
in Early Elementary Education; Middle School 
Education; Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation; and Secondary Education in the 
teaching fields of Art Education, Biology Edu- 
cation, Business Education (with concentra- 
tions in bookkeeping and business manage- 
ment, comprehensive, or data processing: 
cooperative arrangement with Savannah State 
College), Chemistry Education, English Edu- 
cation. General Science Education, Industrial 
Arts Education (cooperative arrangement with 
Savannah State College), Social Science Edu- 
cation (with concentrations in history, political 
science, and behavioral science), and Trade 
and Industrial Education (cooperative arrange- 
ment with Savannah State College). 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene 
Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

The College is authorized to offer Teacher 
Education programs, preparing students for 
certification by the Georgia State Department 
of Education, in the following areas: art, behav- 
ioral science, biology, business education, 
chemistry, early elementary education, Eng- 
lish, general science, history, industrial arts, 
library media, mathematics, middle school 
education, music, physics, political science, 
social studies, trade and industrial education. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

Armstrong State College offers courses ap- 
propriate for the first two years of baccalau- 
reate programs such as engineering, forestry, 
industrial management, pharmacy, physical 
therapy, physics, etc., not offered among its 
degree programs; and the pre-professional 
study appropriate for dentistry, law, medicine, 



veterinary medicine, and the other profes- 
sional fields 

Dual-Degree Programs 

Upon completion of the first three years of 
academic work at Armstrong, the student may 
enroll for two subsequent years at Georgia 
Institute of Technology. After completing the 
requirements of the two cooperating institu- 
tions, the student will be awarded a baccalau- 
reate degree from Armstrong State College 
and a baccalaureate degree in one of a 
number of academic areas from the Georgia 
Institute of Technology. For further information 
on this dual-degree program, the student should 
contact the Head of the Department of Math- 
ematics and Computer Science, who is the 
local coordinator of the Dual-Degree program. 

Joint Continuing Education 
Center Programs 

The Joint Continuing Education Center was 
established in 1 979 to combine the resources 
of Armstrong State College's Community Ser- 
vices Division and Savannah State College's 
Extended Services Division. Utilizing a Down- 
town Center located at 428 Bull Street, the 
Joint Center operates a unified continuing 
education program dedicated to serving the 
people of Savannah, Chatham County, the 
State of Georgia and, for some programs, per- 
sons beyond those boundaries. 

A wide variety of programs is offered at 
Armstrong State College, Savannah State Col- 
lege, the Downtown Center and, when it is 
appropriate, at job sites, schools, community 
centers, and other locations in Savannah. 
Instructors are drawn from the faculties of both 
institutions, from qualified experts in the 
Savannah community, and from consultants 
throughout the region. 

On the Armstrong campus, the Division of 
Community Services underthe direction of the 
Dean for Community Services is responsible 
for the coordination of all community services/ 
continuing education activities. Since these 
activities are viewed as a college-wide func- 
tion, responsibility for program development 
is shared with the various academic depart- 
ments on campus. The major community ser- 
vices/continuing education component of 
the college is the short-course/conference 
program. This unit administers non-degree 
courses, conferences, and seminars designed 
for area residents who do not wish to partici- 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



pate in the regular credit classes offered by the 
college. These activities vary widely — some 
are related to professional development, oth- 
ers reflect personal interests, while others are 
recreational in nature. The Registrar maintains 
permanent records of persons participating in 
activities that meet certain criteria. 

The Division of Community Services coop- 
erates with the University of Georgia Center 
for Continuing Education through service as a 
center at which examinations are proctored 
for students enrolled in independent study 
(correspondence) courses. A booklet describ- 
ing these courses is available upon request. 
Examinations from other colleges and exami- 
nations by professional societies can also be 
proctored. Examination proctoring is by prior 
arrangement only. 

Student Cooperative 
Program 

A student enrolled at Savannah State Col- 
lege or at Armstrong State College as a full- 
time student has the privilege of taking one 
course with his Dean's approval at the other 
college without paying an additional fee. No 
restrictions are placed on the number of 
courses taken at the other college if the stu- 
dent is enrolled in the joint program in Social 
Work. In this program, however, the student 
must enroll in major area courses only to 
receive unrestricted enrollment privileges. A 
student may obtain in the Office of the Regis- 
trar the proper form for permission to register 
for courses at Savannah State College. 



by the use of tests and to require additional 
biographical data and an interview before 
applicants are accepted or rejected. If an 
interview is required, the applicants will be 
notified. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right 
to refuse to accept any or all of the credits from 
any high school or other institution, notwith- 
standing its accredited status, when the Col- 
lege determines through investigation or oth- 
erwise that the quality of instruction at such 
high school or other institution is, for any rea- 
son, deficient or unsatisfactory. The judgment 
of the College on this question shall be final. 

On the basis of achievement as reflected by 
high school or college grades and academic 
potential as shown by scores on the Scholas- 
tic Aptitude Test, an evaluation of each appli- 
cant's readiness to undertake college work will 
be made. The Admissions Officer may refer 
any application to the Admissions Committee 
of the College for study and advice. 

The decision as to whether applicants shall 
be accepted or rejected will be made by the 
Admissions Officer in accordance with admis- 
sion policies and subject to the applicants' 
right of appeal as provided in the policies of the 
Board of Regents of the University System. 
The Admissions Officer shall, as promptly as 
practicable, inform applicants of the action 
taken upon their application. 

The College reserves the right to reject an 
applicant who is not a resident of the State of 
Georgia. All students enrolled at Armstrong 
State College are required to affirm that they 
will abide by the provisions of the Honor Code. 



ADMISSIONS 



General Information 

Application forms for admission to Arm- 
strong State College are provided by the Office 
of Admissions upon request. Applications can- 
not be considered until all required forms are 
completed and returned to the Office of 
Admissions. 

Applicants must be at least sixteen years old 
on or before registration date and must give 
evidence of good moral character, promise of 
growth and development, seriousness of pur- 
pose, and a sense of social responsibility. 
Armstrong State College reserves the right to 
examine and appraise the character, the per- 
sonality, and the physical fitness of applicants 



Information Required of 
Freshmen Applicants 

All freshmen applicants must submit the 

following: 

1. a. Certificate of graduation from an accred- 
ited high school. A transcript of the high 
school record must be submitted by the 
high school directly to the College. 
OR 
b. Evidence of successful completion of 
the General Education Development Test 
(GED), with no scores less than 45. A 
score report form must be submitted 
directly to the college from the GED test- 
ing center where the student took the 
test or by DANTES, 2318 South Park 
Street, Madison, Wisconsin 5371 3 (if the 
student took the test through the United 



ADMISSIONS 



States Armed Forces Institute while in 

military service). 
2 Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Apti- 
tude Test of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board Specific scores required are 
listed under the categories of admission 
Official results of the SAT must be filed with 
the Office of Admissions by the final date 
for the submission of an application for the 
quarter in which a student wishes to enroll. 
Students wishing to make application to 
take the SAT may secure application forms 
from their secondary school principal or 
counselor or from the College Entrance 
Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, 
New Jersey 08540. 

Regular Admission 

Applicants who meet all three of the follow- 
ing requirements will be granted regular ad- 
mission to the College: 
. A total score on the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test of at least 750 (combined verbal and 
mathematics sections) 

I A score of not less than 330 on the verbal 
section of the Scholastic Aptitude Test 

J. A score of not less than 330 on the mathe- 
matics section of the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test. 

Conditional Admission 

An applicant who qualifies for admission to 
he College but who does not qualify for regu- 
ar admission will be granted conditional ad- 
mission. A student is conditionally admitted to 
[he College if the SAT score total is less than 
j50 or if any part of the SAT score (verbal or 
pnath) is less than 330. 

All conditionally admitted students must 
ake the Basic Skills Examination (BSE) in 
prder to qualify for regular admission. This 
xamination should be taken before the stu- 
dent's first registration at the College. If a con- 
ditionally admitted student fails to take the BSE 
»efore registering, the choice of courses (until 
he test is taken) will be limited by the student's 

('AT scores as follows: 
If the verbal SAT score is less than 330— 
must take English 098 and Reading 098 

If the verbal SAT score is 330-440— may 
take English 099 

If the verbal SAT score is 450-490— may 
take English 100 



If the verbal SAT score is 500 and up— may 
take English 101 

If the math SAT score is less than 41 — 
eligible for Math 098 only 

Any other courses taken prior to taking and 
passing the BSE must be approved by the 
Head of the Department of Developmental 
Studies, or by the Counselor of that department 

A student in the Developmental Studies 
Program must have a schedule of classes 
approved by the Head of the Department of 
Developmental Studies or the Counselor each 
time the student registers or preregisters. The 
Head of the Department may refuse to allow a 
student in the Developmental Studies Program 
to enroll in any course for which the student 
lacks a prerequisite or for which the student's 
academic preparation appears inadequate. 

Once a student is conditionally admitted, 
regular admission status may be obtained only 
through the following: 

1 . Passing all parts of the Basic Skills Exami- 
nation on the first attempt. 

2. If any part of the BSE is not passed on the 
first attempt the student will be required to 
enroll in the appropriate remedial course. 
Upon successful completion of all required 
Developmental Studies courses, the stu- 
dent will be granted regular admission. 

A student in the Developmental Studies 
Program will not be allowed to continue as a 
student at the College if the student receives 
three grades other than P for a course required 
in the Developmental Studies Program. Grades 
other than P include U, I, W, WU, and WF. 
Copies of the policies of the Developmental 
Studies Program may be obtained from the 
Developmental Studies Office. 

Advanced Placement and 
Credit by Examination 

Armstrong State College gives advanced 
placement, or in some cases college credit, for 
college-level high school courses, on the 
basis of the student's grade on the College 
Board Advanced Placement Examination or 
the Admissions Testing Program achievement 
tests and approval by the appropriate depart- 
ment head at Armstrong State College. 

College credit may be granted for satisfac- 
tory scores on selected tests of the College- 
Level Examination Program (CLEP), for satis- 
factory completion of appropriate courses and 
tests offered through the United States Armed 



10 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Forces Institute (USAFI), and for military ser- 
vice schools and experience as recommended 
by the Commission on Accreditation of Ser- 
vice Experiences of the American Council on 
Education. Such credits may not exceed more 
than one-fourth of the work counted toward a 
degree. 

Specifically, students with a strong aca- 
demic background may, through certain exam- 
inations, demonstrate competence in: ART 
200; BIO 1 01 , 1 02; ENG 101,1 02; CJ 1 00, 204; 
Foreign Language 1 01 , 1 02, 1 03; HIS 1 1 4, 1 1 5, 
251 , 252; MAT 101,1 03, 206, 207; MUS 200; 
Natural Science without laboratory; POS 
1 1 3, SOC 201 . For information concerning the 
examinations which apply to the specific areas, 
please make inquiry to the Office of Admis- 
sions, the Office of the Registrar, the Office of 
Counseling and Placement, or the head of the 
appropriate academic department. 

Requirements of Transfer 
Applicants 

1. Transfer applicants will follow the same 
procedures as freshmen applicants except 
that transfer applicants who will have 
achieved sophomore standing at the time 
of their entrance will not be required to 
submit their high school records. Such 
records may be required by the Office of 
Admissions but normally the transcripts of 
previous college records will suffice in 
place of the high school record. Transfer 
applicants must ask the Registrar of each 
college they have previously attended to 
mail an official transcript of their records to 
the Office of Admissions at Armstrong 
State College, regardless of the transfera- 
bility of the credits. 

2. Transfer applicants who will enter with less 
than 36 quarter hours completed must 
meet entrance requirements of both fresh- 
men and transfer applicants and will be 
required to submit their high school records 
as well as transcripts of college records. 

3. Transfer applicants will not be eligible for 
admission to Armstrong State College un- 
less they are eligible to return to the last 
college attended on the date they expect to 
enter Armstrong. Students who are on sus- 
pension from another college because of 
poor scholarship or for disciplinary reasons 
will not be eligible for admission. 

4. Transfer applicants will be considered for 
admission to Armstrong State College, if, on 
all work attempted at other institutions, their 



academic performance as shown by their 
grade-point-average is equivalent to the 
minimum standard required by Armstrong 
State College students by comparable 
standing. (See chart under Academic Pro- 
bation and Dismissal Policy in the "Aca- 
demic Regulations" section of thisCatalog.) 

5. Credit will be given for transfer work in 
which students received a grade of "C" or 
above. Credit will also be given for transfer 
work in which the students received grades 
of "D", with the limitation that such credit 
will not exceed twenty-five percent of the 
total amount of credit accepted with grades 
of "C" or above. College credit will not be 
allowed for such courses as remedial Eng- 
lish or remedial mathematics or courses 
basically of secondary school level. 

6. Credits earned at an institution which is not 
a member of the appropriate regional accred- 
iting agency can be accepted on a provi- 
sional basis only. Students transferring from 
an institution which is not a member of a 
regional accrediting agency must achieve 
a "C" average on their first fifteen quarter 
hours of work at Armstrong in order to be 
eligible to continue. In certain areas they 
may be required to validate credits by 
examination. In computing cumulative grade 
averages, only the work attempted at Arm- 
strong will be considered. 

7. The amount of credit that Armstrong will 
allow for work done in another institution 
within a given period of time may not 
exceed the normal amount of credit that 
could have been earned at Armstrong dur- 
ing that time. A maximum of 100 quarter 
hours may be transferred from a junior col- 
lege. At least half of the courses in the 
major field must be taken at Armstrong. 

8. Not more than one-fourth of the work 
counted toward a degree may be taken 
through correspondence or extension 
courses. No correspondence courses may 
be used to meet requirements in the major 
field or the related field for the bachelor's 
degree. No correspondence course may 
be taken while enrolled at Armstrong State 
College without prior approval of the Vice- 
President and the head of the department in 
which the student is majoring. Correspon- 
dence credit will not be accepted for courses 
in English composition orforeign language. 

9. If the Core Curriculum requirements in 
Area I (Humanities), Area II (Sciences), 
and/or Area III (Social Sciences) have 
been completed in a University System of 



ADMISSIONS 



11 



Georgia institution, each completed area 
will be accepted as having met the respec- 
tive area requirement at Armstrong State 
College. 

Readmission 

Students who have not been enrolled at 
Armstrong for one or more quarters must apply 
for readmission on a form provided by the 
Office of Admissions. This requirement does 
not apply to students who do not register for 
courses during the summer quarter. Former 
students who have not attended another col- 
lege since leaving Armstrong may be readmit- 
ted provided they are not on suspension at the 
time they wish to reenter. Former students who 
have attended another college since leaving 
Armstrong must meet requirements as listed in 
the bulletin in effect at the time of return. 

Transient Students 
Entering Armstrong 

Transient status means that students are 
admitted only for a specified period of time, 
? normally for one quarter. Applicants for tran- 
sient status must file a regular application form 
and submit a statement from their Dean or 
i Registrar that they are in good standing and 
have permission to take specific courses at 
Armstrong to be transferred to their own insti- 
tution when satisfactorily completed. Since 
j transient students are not admitted as regular 
I students, transcripts of college work com- 
Ipleted elsewhere are not usually required of 
[such applicants. Transient students who wish 
[to remain at Armstrong longer than one quar- 
ter must submit additional statements from 
■their Dean or Registrar or must meet all 
[requirements for regular admission as transfer 
students. 

Armstrong Students 
Transient Elsewhere 

Armstrong students who wish to take course 
work at another college with the intent of apply- 
ing the courses to their academic record at 
Armstrong may do so in accordance with 
'egulations for transient status to another col- 
ege. The student must meet the requirements 
stipulated by the other college, and in order to 

pply the credits toward his or her academic 
'ecord at Armstrong, must meet the academic 

egulations of Armstrong. Consult with the 
Registrar's Office for details. 



Accelerated Program for 
High School Students 

High school students who have completed 
the eleventh grade, who have met the criteria 
for admission to the program and who main- 
tain its standards will be permitted to enroll for 
college credit in at least one course but not 
more than two courses each quarter while 
they complete the senior year of high school. 
Upon graduation from high school, these stu- 
dents will be admitted as regular students to 
the College. 

Through this program, students may com- 
plete over two-thirds of the freshman year of 
college before beginning a regular college 
career. Students accepted in the program may 
choose any freshman course for which they 
meet all the prerequisites, with permission of 
their high school principal or counselor and 
college advisor. 

Students forfeit the privilege of this program 
if in any quarter a grade in a college course is 
below C or the high school average in aca- 
demic courses is below B. 

The College will consider students for this 
program only upon written recommendation of 
high school principals or counselors. In the 
view of the College, it is only these individuals 
who can judge the circumstances that may 
make the program valuable and practicable 
for any student. 

To be admitted to the program students 
must satisfy all of the following criteria: 

1 . written recommendation by the principal or 
counselor of the high school; 

2. completion of the eleventh grade in an 
accredited high school; 

3. a combined verbal and mathematics SAT 
score of 1,000; 

4. a minimum grade-point-average of 3.0 in 
high school work. 

Early Admission and Joint 
Enrollment Programs 

Armstrong State College offers an early 
admission program for those students who 
have completed the eleventh grade in high 
school and who have demonstrated outstand- 
ing academic potential. The criteria for admis- 
sion to this program are the same as those 
listed for the Accelerated Program. 

Additionally, the college cooperates with the 
Chatham County School System in the offer- 
ing of a joint enrollment program which is an 
early admission program allowing students to 



12 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



enroll full time at the College while remaining 
on the rolls of a local high school. After suc- 
cessfully meeting all established criteria for 
the early admission program, students will be 
awarded high school diplomas at the end of 
their freshman year in college. For further 
information on this program prospective appli- 
cants should consult their high school counsel- 
ors and request information from the Office of 
Admissions. 

Foreign Students 

It is recommended that foreign students 
begin their attendance at the college in the Fall 
Quarter. The college also recommends that 
foreign students attend an ELS language cen- 
ter prior to enrollment. (Applications for ELS 
are available from the Admissions Coordina- 
tor, ELS Language Center, 3331 Ocean Park 
Blvd. Suite 201, Santa Monica, California 
90405.) 

Students from a country other than the Unit- 
ed States who are interested in attending 
Armstrong must meet the following require- 
ments before application is made: 

1. Meet the requirements of freshman ap- 
plicants. 

2. Have an official transcript of academic 
records mailed to the Office of Admissions 
at Armstrong with an official translation. 

3. Take the SAT of the College Entrance 
Examination Board and ask that the results 
be sent to Armstrong. 

4. Take the Test of English as a Foreign Lan- 
guage (TOEFL) and score a minimum of 
500 for consideration for admission to the 
college. 

5. Submit a statement of financial resources 
prior to attendance. 

6. Show proof of adequate health and life 
insurance. 

If applicants meet the academic require- 
ments for admission, they will be sent an appli- 
cation form. After it has been returned and 
approved, the applicants will be sent an I-20 
Form (I-20A and I-20B), which they can take to 
the American consul to ask for a student visa. 
Upon arrival, they will be tested in English 
composition for class placement. 

Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong 
State College and upon receipt of Certification 
of Eligibility and Entitlement from the Veterans 
Administration, veterans may attend under 



Public Law 358 (Veterans Readjustment Benefit 
Act of 1 966), Public Law 81 5 (disabled), Public 
Law 894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war 
orphans), or Public Law 631 (children of per- 
manently disabled veterans). Students under 
Public Laws 358, 361 , or 634 should be pre- 
pared to pay tuition and fees at the time of 
registration. 

Vocational Rehabilitation 
Applicants 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational 
Rehabilitation or other community agencies 
must apply at least six weeks before the 
beginning of any quarter to insure proper pro- 
cessing of applications. 

Requirements for Admission 
to Fine Arts Programs 

The college-level study of art and music 
requires considerable background as well as a 
basic proficiency level. Those students who 
wish to major in art are expected to show the 
faculty a portfolio of previous work in at least 
one medium. In music, placement examina- 
tions are required of all entering students in 
music theory and applied music. 

Requirements and 
Procedures for Admission 
to Health Programs 



Associate Degree Nursing 

Admission to Armstrong State College does 
not in any way guarantee formal admission to 
the Associate Degree Nursing Program. It is 
important that the applicant for admission to 
this program file all papers required as early as 
possible in the academic year preceding the 
Fall Quarter in which the applicant wishes to 
enroll. 

The Admissions Committee of the Depart- 
ment of Associate Degree Nursing will act only 
on completed applications. Admission deci- 
sions will normally be made in April. Students 
who qualify for admission but who are not 
admitted because of lack of space may re- 
apply for the following year's class, repeating 
all application procedures. Students admitted 
for a given academic year must enter the pro- 



ADMISSIONS 



13 



gram during that academic year or re-apply for 
admission for any subsequent year. Determi- 
nation of admission to the program is a func- 
tion of the faculty. 

Transfer students must meet the minimum 
criteria for admission to the Department of 
Associate Degree Nursing as stated. Credit for 
nursing courses and science courses taken 
prior to application to the program must be 
approved by the Department of Associate 
Degree Nursing. Students wishing to be given 
transfer credits for nursing and science courses 
which are five years old or older may be 
required to validate the credits by taking 
departmental examinations or be required to 
repeat these courses for credit. 

Applicationsfor admission should be clearly 
marked "Associate Degree Nursing". 

The Associate in Science degree program 
in Nursing is approved by the Georgia Board of 
Nursing and is fully accredited by the National 
League for Nursing (NLN). 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission tothe Associate Degree Nursing 
major is on a space available basis and is 
limited to the best qualified students as deter- 
mined by the Associate Degree Nursing faculty. 
Admission criteria include: 

1 . A minimum SAT verbal score of 350. 

2. A minimum SAT mathematics score of 350. 

3. A minimum SAT combined verbal/mathe- 
matics score of 750. 

\. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in a high school 
curriculum which includes natural and social 
sciences. 

. A minimum adjusted college GPA of 2.0 for 
both all college coursework taken and for 
general requirements of the Associate 
Degree Nursing curriculum, with no more 
than one repeat grade from among the 
general requirement courses. 
Applicants who do not meet the preceding 

riteria may apply for admission after having 
net the following: 

Completion of two courses selected from 
CHE 201 , ZOO 208, ZOO 209 with grades of 
"C" or better; three courses selected from 
ENG 101. ENG 102, HIS 251 or HIS 252, 
POS 113, PSY 101 with a minimum 2.0 
average. Completion of these five courses 
must be no later than the end of the Winter 
Quarter prior to the Fall Quarter for which 
admission is sought. 

A minimum adjusted college GPA of 2.0 for 
both all college coursework taken and for 



general requirements of the Associate 
Degree Nursing curriculum, with no more 
than one repeat grade from among the 
general requirement courses. 

Time Limit for Program 
Completion 

Students must complete the Associate 
Degree Nursing Program within three con- 
secutive academic years from the date of 
their initial admission to the program. Stu- 
dents who do not complete the program 
within this time limit must reapply for admis- 
sion, meet current criteria for admission, 
and have their previous credits evaluated 
at the time of their subsequent admission. 
Students who are readmitted must meet 
course requirements in effect at the time of 
their readmission. 

Readmission Procedures 

The student must complete the readmis- 
sion application for Armstrong State College. 

2. The student will be required to meet admis- 
sion and curriculum requirements in effect 
at the time of readmission. 

3. The student's readmission will be based 
upon space available and recommenda- 
tion by the Department of Associate Degree 
Nursing. 

4. Students who have been dismissed are 
ineligible for readmission. 



Baccalaureate Degree 
Nursing 

Applicants to the program must be regularly 
admitted to Armstrong State College prior to 
making application to the nursing major. Stu- 
dents must meet the admission requirements 
of the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing 
to be eligible for admission to the nursing 
major. Admission to the nursing major is the 
function of the Faculty. Only completed appli- 
cations will be considered. 

Students will be admitted to the nursing 
major during Winter Quarter, Sophomore year. 
When the class is filled, the Departmental 
Admissions Committee will close admissions. 
Students who qualify but who are not admitted 
because of lack of space may reapply for the 
next quarter that students are admitted. Grad- 
uates who are not already Registered Nurses 



14 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



may apply to take the NCLEX examination for 
licensure as an RN. 

Applicants may address the Head of the 
Department of Baccalaureate Nursing if they 
require additional information concerning ad- 
mission procedures. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the nursing major is on a 
space-available basis and is limited to the best 
qualified students as determined by the Depart- 
mental Baccalaureate Nursing Admissions 
Committee. Admission criteria include: 

1 . Regular admission to Armstrong State Col- 
lege 

2. A minimum SAT verbal score of 350 

3. A minimum SAT mathematics score of 350 

4. A verbal/mathematics combined SAT of 
not less than 750. (SAT scores will not be 
required for those applicants with Asso- 
ciate, Bachelor's or Master's Degrees.) 

5. A grade of "C" or better in each science 
course. If credits earned in science courses 
are more than 5 years old, the student may 
be required to either challenge or repeat 
the courses. 

6. An adjusted GPA of 2.5 in all prerequisite 
course work attempted. 

In order to be eligible to registerfor BSN 331 , 
students must successfully complete the 1 02 
hours of pre-nursing course work listed in the 
pre-nursing curriculum and be admitted to the 
nursing major. 

Transfer applicants and those with degrees 
in other fields must meet the criteria estab- 
lished for admission to the nursing major. 
Level of entry will be determined by the 
Department of Baccalaureate Nursing. Transfer 
credit will be awarded depending upon equiv- 
alency of courses. These decisions will be 
determined by the Departmental Admissions 
Committee using actual course outlines, de- 
scriptions, etc., supplied by the student. 

Registered Nurse applicants must meet the 
criteria established for admission to the nurs- 
ing major and must also submit proof of licen- 
sure. After admission to the nursing major, 
Registered Nurses may challenge a maximum 
of 44 credit hours through written examina- 
tions and/or practical examinations. In order 
to challenge nursing courses, the Registered 
Nurse student must complete all general edu- 
cation courses included in the Baccalaureate 
Nursing Curriculum Guide for the Freshman 
and Sophomore years and BSN 331 prior to 
beginning challenge exams for the nursing 



courses BSN 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337 
338. These nursing courses are sequencei 
and students must follow the sequence in th( 
prescribed order. Challenge examinations are 
administered on a pass/fail basis. The studen 
who fails a challenge examination will be 
required to take the course. Credit obtained b) 
challenge examinations or course work mus 
be completed before enrolling in Senior leve 
courses. 

Time Limit for Program 
Completion 

Students must complete the Baccalaureate 
Nursing Program within four consecutive year? 
from the date of their initial admission to the 
nursing major. Students who do not complete 
the program within this time limit must apply foi 
readmission, meet current criteria for admis- 
sion, and have their previous credits evalu- 
ated. Students who are granted readmissior 
must meet course requirements in effect at the 
time of readmission. 

Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmis- 
sion application for Armstrong State Col- 
lege and the nursing major. 

2. The student will be required to meet admis- 
sion and curriculum requirements in effect 
at the time of readmission. 

3. The student's readmission will be based 
upon space available and recommenda- 
tion by the Admissions Committee of the 
Department of Baccalaureate Nursing. 

4. Students who have been dismissed are 
ineligible for readmission. 



Associate Degree Dental 
Hygiene 

Admission to Armstrong State College does 
not in any way guarantee admission to the 
Associate Degree Program in Dental Hygiene. 
Applicants must first be accepted for admis- 
sion to the College with regular admission sta- 
tus; they then must meet the requirements for 
admission to the Associate Degree Program in 
Dental Hygiene before being accepted as stu- 
dents in that program. 

Admission to the program is limited in each 
class. Students matriculate in the Fall Quarter 
of each year. Applications for admission should 



ADMISSIONS 



15 



be completed as soon as possible for the Fall 
Quarter and must include a transcript of all 
academic work. 

The major part of the applicant's high school 
work should be in the college preparatory 
area. Because of the heavy emphasis on 
science in the dental hygiene curriculum, it is 
important that the applicant have a strong 
foundation in biology and chemistry. 

Applicants who are on academic probation 
or suspension from another college will not be 
considered for admission to the program. 
Unless specifically approved by the Head of 
the department, credit will not be accepted for 
courses taken in another school of dental 
hygiene. 

Applications for admission should beclearly 
marked "For Dental Hygiene Only". 

Applicants may contact the Head of the 
Department of Dental Hygiene if they require 
additional information concerning admission 
procedures. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Dental 
Hygiene major is on a space available basis 
and is limited to the best qualified students as 
determined by the Dental Hygiene Admissions 
Committee. Admission criteria include: 

1. A 2.5 or better high school grade-point 
average. 

2. An SAT score (composite verbal and math- 
ematics) of 750 or above. 

3. A grade-point-average of 2.0 on all pre- 
vious college work, if applicable. Students 
transferring from another college must have 
this average to be considered for admis- 
sion. The 2.0 average must be maintained 
to date of actual matriculation in the pro- 
gram. 

The Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee 
A/ill give special consideration to applicants 
Mio have completed one year of college work 
and who have completed CHE 201 or ZOO 
208 (or their equivalents) with a grade of "C" or 
setter. 

After all credentials have been received, the 
applicant should request a personal interview 
with the Dental Hygiene Admissions Commit- 
ee to discuss the application. 

^admission Procedures 

Students who have been admitted to and 
lave enrolled in the Associate Degree Pro- 
ram in Dental Hygiene, but who have either 



withdrawn or have been dropped from the pro- 
gram, may apply for readmission to the pro- 
gram only if they have a cumulative college 
GPA of 2.0 at the time they wish to reenter. The 
student's readmission will be based upon 
space available and recommendation by the 
Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee. 



Baccalaureate Degree 
Dental Hygiene Education 

Candidates for the program must be gradu- 
ates of accredited associate degree dental 
hygiene programs and licensed as registered 
dental hygienists. 

Students begin their course of sequenced 
dental hygiene courses in the Fall Quarter. 
Application for admission should be completed 
as soon as possible. 

Transfer credits are accepted for courses 
other than the professional sequence. A min- 
imum of 45 quarter hours must be earned at 
Armstrong State College for the Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Dental Hygiene Education 
to be awarded from this institution. The Office 
of the Registrar will evaluate all transfer credits. 

Applications for admission should be clearly 
marked "For Dental Hygiene Only". 

Applicants may contact the Head of the 
Department of Dental Hygiene at Armstrong 
State College if they require additional infor- 
mation concerning admission to the program. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1. One year of professional experience pre- 
ferred. This may include any dental-related 
work experience. 

2. A minimum 2.0 GPA on all previous college 
work. Students transferring from another 
college must have this average to be con- 
sidered for admission. The 2.0 average 
must be maintained to date of actual matricu- 
lation in the program. 



How to Apply 



; 



1 . Complete all papers required for admission 
to Armstrong State College. Mark the appli- 
cation For Dental Hygiene Only. These 
forms are to be returned to the Office of 
Admissions. 

2. Complete and return to the Department of 
Dental Hygiene, the Dental Hygiene Bache- 



16 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



lor of Science Application Form and a 
recent photograph. 
3. Submit National Board Scores to the Depart- 
ment of Dental Hygiene. Applicants should 
contact the Head of the Department of Den- 
tal Hygiene if they require additional infor- 
mation. 



Associate Degree Health 
Information Management 

It is suggested that students planning to 
apply to this program have a minimum of one 
course in each of the following: typing, secre- 
tarial or business courses, English, biological 
science, mathematics, and speech on the high 
school level. 

New classes in the HIM program begin each 
Fall Quarter. Since a limited number of stu- 
dents is accepted, applicants should submit 
completed applications by June 1 of each 
year. 

To meet contractual obligations with the 
clinical sites, the HIM program requires stu- 
dents to submit a completed health history 
form and evidence of health insurance cover- 
age prior to participation in clinical practicums. 
This documentation is submitted to the HIM 
Program Office. 

Graduates are eligible to take the national 
accreditation examination to become "Ac- 
credited Record Technicians," (ART) 
through the American Medical Record As- 
sociation. 

Applicationsfor admission should be clearly 
marked "Health Information Management." 
Applicants may address the Head of the 
Health Information Management program if 
they require additional information concerning 
admission procedures. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1. A total SAT score of 750, with minimum 
scores of 350 on the verbal section and 350 
on the mathematics section. 

2. A minimum GPA of 2.0 on any previous high 
school or college work. 

3. A demonstration of typing proficiency of 40 
wpm. 

4. A satisfactory medical examination by a 
physician (Physical Exam forms can be 
obtained in the HIM office.) 



5. A letter of recommendation mailed to the 
Program Director. 

6. An interview with a member of the HIM 
faculty. 

Time Limit for Program 
Completion 

The HIM program is a seven quarter pro- 
gram. Students must complete the associate 
degree in HIM within four consecutive aca- 
demic years from the date of their initial 
admission to the program. Students who do 
not complete the program within this time limit 
must reapply for admission, meet current crite- 
ria for admission, and have their previous cred- 
its evaluated at the time of their subsequent 
admission. Students who are readmitted must 
meet course requirements in effect at the time 
of their readmission. 



Associate Degree 
Respiratory Therapy 

Admission to Armstrong State College does 
not guarantee admission to the Respiratory 
Therapy Department. The department has a 
separate formal admissions process in addi- 
tion to the admission process to Armstrong 
State College. 

Students are only admitted to the program 
during the Fall Quarter. The application pro- 
cess begins during the Winter break preceding 
the desired admission date. Deadline for com- 
pleted applications is June 1. Applications 
received after that date will be considered on a 
first come-first serve, space-available basis. 

To meet contractual obligations with the 
clinical affiliates, the program requires stu- 
dents to submit a complete health history form 
and evidence of liability (malpractice) insur- 
ance priorto participation in clinical practicums. 

Applicationsfor admission should beclearly 
marked "For Respiratory Therapy Only." Appli- 
cants may address the Head of the Respira- 
tory Therapy Department if they require addi- 
tional information concerning admissions pro- 
cedures. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 
1. Regular admission to Armstrong Stat 
College. 



ADMISSIONS 



17 



2 Good standing with college at the time of 
student selection. 

3 A minimum SAT verbal score of 350. 

4. A minimum SAT mathematics score of 350. 

5. A minimum SAT combined verbal/mathe- 
matics score of 750. 

6. A minimum GPA of 2.0 for all previous col- 
lege and high school work. 

Readmission to the 
Program 

Students who have been admitted to and 
have enrolled in the Associate Program in 
Respiratory Therapy but who have either with- 
drawn or have been suspended from the pro- 
gram may apply for readmission provided they 
have an adjusted GPA or 2.0 at the time they 
wish to reenter. 

A student who has been dismissed from the 
program for any reason will not be eligible for 
readmission. 



Associate Degree Radiologic 
Technologies Program 

Admission to Armstrong State College does 
not guarantee admission to the Radiologic 
Technologies Program. The Program has a 
separate formal admissions process in addi- 
tion to the admission process to Armstrong 
State College. 

Students are only admitted to the program 
during the Fall Quarter. The application pro- 
cess begins during the Winter quarter preceding 
the desired admission date. Deadline for com- 
pletion of the application process is June 1. 
Applications received after that date will be 
considered on a first come-first serve, space- 
available basis. 

To meet contractual obligations with the 
clinical affiliates, the program requires stu- 
dents to submit a complete health history form, 
evidence of health insurance, and evidence of 
liability (malpractice) insurance priorto partic- 
ipation in clinical practicums. 

Applicationsfor admission should beclearly 
marked "For Radiologic Technologies Only." 
Applicants may addressthe Head of the Radi- 
ologic Technologies program if they require 
additional information concerning admissions 
procedures. 



Criteria for Admission 

The actual determination of admission of 
applicants to the program is a function of the 
Radiologic Technologies Program Admissions 
Committee. Admissions are competitive in 
nature and based on scholastic history, work 
experience, personal references, and a per- 
sonal interview. 

The following are specific criteria for ad- 
mission: 

1 . A combined score of 750 on the verbal and 
mathematics sections of the SAT of the 
College Entrance Examination Board, with 
a score of not less than 350 on the verbal 
section or a score of not less than 350 on 
the mathematics section. 

2. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in a high school 
curriculum. 

3. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in all science and 
mathematics courses in the high school 
curriculum. 

4. A minimum overall adjusted college GPA of 
2.0, if applicable. 

5. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in all mathematics 
and science courses at the college levels. 

Applicants who do not meet the criteria for 
admissions outlines above may still apply for 
admission. Please contact the Program for 
information. 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have been admitted to and 
have enrolled in the Associate Degree Pro- 
gram in Radiologic Technologies, but who 
have either withdrawn or been dismissed 
without prejudice from the program, may apply 
for readmission to the program only if they 
have a cumulative college GPA of 2.0 at the 
time they wish to reenter. The student's read- 
mission will be based upon space availability 
and recommendation by theRadiologicTech- 
nologies Admissions Committee. 



Baccalaureate Degree 
Health Science 

Criteria for Admission to 
Program 

1. Regular admission to Armstrong State 
College. 



18 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



2. Completed Health Science Program appli- 
cation (Send to Health Science Program 
Office). 

3. If applicant is currently a health practi- 
tioner, include: 

A. A copy of your health credential 

B. Confidential Appraisal Forms (2) Send to 
Health Science Program Office. 

Criteria for Admission to 
Courses 

1. Completion of 90 hours of appropriate 
coursework. 

2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 in all courses with 
not more than one science repeat. 

3. Advanced Standing: All credit for previous 
coursework will be subject to faculty eval- 
uation. Admission to and progression 
through the program is a function of the 
faculty. 



Baccalaureate Degree 
Medical Technology 
Program 

General Information 

The two year professional phase of the Med- 
ical Technology curriculum begins in the Fall 
quarter of each year with the junior year level 
MT courses. Students desiring acceptance to 
the Medical Technology Program should make 
application to the program during the early 
spring of the preceeding academic year. 

Due to the competition for the limited number 
of seats in the class, all students submitting a 
complete application before the announced 
deadline will be ranked. The applicants receiv- 
ing the highest "Applicant Score" will be 
offered a seat in the class before those appli- 
cants with lower scores. Applications received 
after the announced deadline will be consi- 
dered on an individual basis provided space is 
available. 

Minimum Admission 
Requirements 

1 . SAT of at least 750 with 350 or more in Math 
and 350 or more in Verbal. 

2. Grade Point Average of 2.0 or more. 

3. Completion of 95 quarter hours which is to 



include an adequate number of required 
chemistry and biology courses such as to 
permit the student time to complete all non- 
professional course requirements prior to 
the senior year. 

4. No more than two required science courses 
with grade of D. 

5. Satisfactory completion of Regents' Test- 
ing Program. 

Other Requirements 

Per NAACLS requirement, all applicants 
must have taken the organic or biochemistry 
course and the microbiology course within the 
past seven years. Updating coursework can 
be done by completion (a grade of "C" or 
better) of the appropriate course or by a chal- 
lenge examination. 

Currently enrolled Armstrong State College 
students must also meet the requirements for 
admission to the MT program and apply to the 
program. 

Transfer students must be accepted to the 
college with "Regular Status" admission. 

Certified associate degree medical labora- 
tory technicians may receive transfer credit for 
junior level MT courses upon presentation of 
acceptable certification scores and/ortransfer 
credit and satisfactory completion of written 
and/or practical examinations in the profes- 
sional content areas. 

An applicant with B.S. degree not desiring 
the B.S. in Medical Technology degree must 
meet the National Accrediting Agency for Clin- 
ical Laboratory Sciences academic prerequi- 
sites for Medical Technology. These students 
will be awarded a certificate upon completion 
of the professional coursework. 

Foreign applicants must meet the require- 
ments for admission to Armstrong State Col- 
lege as outlined in the college catalog. 

Application Process 

1. Complete all requirements for Application 
for Admission to Armstrong State College if 
not currently enrolled at ASC. 

2. Complete an Application to Medical Tech- 
nology Program form. 

3. Have official transcripts sent to Program 
Director. 

4. If certified, have scores sent to Program 
Director. (Ask Program Director for form 
letter.) 

5. Applicants meeting the minimum admis- 
sion requirements will be invited for an 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



19 



interview with at least two of the Admission 
Committee members, one of whom is the 
Program Director. 

6. Request two references to complete Confi- 
dential Appraisal Form to be forwarded to 
Program Director. 

7. All applicants will be informed by letter of 
their application status. 

Applicant Ranking 

As previously indicated, all applicants will be 
ranked to determine priority for admission to 
the class. An applicant score will be deter- 
mined by evaluating the applicant in the follow- 
ing categories. The value of each category is 
as given: 

Overall GPA 20% 

Science GPA 35% 

SAT 1 5% 

Interview 20% 

Reference 5% 

Profile 5% 

A detailed explanation of the calculation of the 
Applicant Score may be obtained from the 
Program Director. 

ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 



Academic Advisement 

All students are required to participate in the 
advisement system at Armstrong State Col- 
lege. The Vice-President and Dean of Faculty 
gives overall direction to the advisement pro- 
gram, with the appropriate department heads 
coordinating advisement activities within the 
various departments. Students who have se- 
lected a major or general field of study are 
advised by the appropriate department. Develop- 
mental Studies students are advised by the 
Developmental Studies Counselor. All other 
students are advised by Core Curriculum 
Advisors. Freshmen and transfers who have 
selected a major will be advised in the aca- 
demic department of their major. Freshmen 
and transfers who have not selected a major 
and have not completed the core require- 
ments will be advised by Core Curriculum 
Advisors. 

The student's course selections must be 
approved by an advisor as an integral part of 
Uhe registration process. Students are respon- 

L 



sible for fulfilling the requirements of their 
degree program and must observe all regula- 
tions for admission to courses, including meet- 
ing prerequisite requirements 

English Composition 
Requirements 

During the initial quarters of enrollment at 
Armstrong State College students must enroll 
in the appropriate sequence of English com- 
position courses until the sequence has been 
completed and/or the Regents' Test has been 
passed. For assistance with identifying the 
appropriate English composition courses, stu- 
dents may consult with advisors in the depart- 
ment of their declared major, in the Office of 
Admissions, or in the Department of Lan- 
guages, Literature and Dramatic Arts. 

Degree Requirements 

1 . Each student is responsible for fulfilling the 
requirements of the degree program chosen 
in accordance with the regulations of the 
college catalog. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a 
degree are permitted only with the written 
approval of the appropriate Dean, upon the 
recommendation of the department head. 

3. A student will normally graduate under the 
catalog in effect at the time of admission to 
the College. Armstrong State College, how- 
ever, reserves the right to change any pro- 
vision listed in this catalog, including but not 
limited to academic requirements for grad- 
uation, without actual notice to individual 
students. If students have been absent 
from the College for two or more consecu- 
tive years, they should expect to meet all 
requirements in effect at the time of return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work 
counted toward a degree may consist of 
courses taken by correspondence, exten- 
sion, or examination. No correspondence 
courses may be used to meet the require- 
ments in the major field or related fields for 
the Bachelor's degree or in English compo- 
sition of foreign language. No correspon- 
dence courses may be taken while a stu- 
dent is enrolled, without prior approval of 
the appropriate Dean and the head of the 
department in which the student is majoring. 

5. By State law, one of the requirements for a 
diploma or certificate from schools sup- 
ported by the State of Georgia is a demon- 
stration of proficiency in United States his- 



20 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



tory and government and in Georgia history 
and government. A student at Armstrong 
State College may demonstrate such profi- 
ciency by: 

A. Examinations — Students may take 
either the relevant CLEP, College Board 
Admissions Testing Program Achievement 
Test, or Advanced Placement Test. 

B. Credit in the following — for U.S. and 
Georgia Constitution: POS 1 1 3; for U.S. and 
Georgia History: HIS 251 or 252 or any 
upper division course in U.S. History. 

6. To qualify for the baccalaureate degree, a 
student must earn at Armstrong at least 45 
quarter hours of credit applicable toward 
the degree. Additionally, the student must 
complete successfully at Armstrong a major- 
ity of the upper division credits required in 
the major field of study. For students in 
teacher education programs, the major 
field of study is the teaching field. For the 
Associate Degree, the student must com- 
plete at least 45 quarter hours of course 
work at Armstrong State College. Armstrong 
students enrolled in the cooperative degree 
programs with Savannah State College in 
Business Education, Industrial Arts Educa- 
tion, and Trade and Industrial Education 
may be exempted from these requirements 
by a recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Education, concurrence by the 
School of Education Curriculum Commit- 
tee and approval of the Committee on Aca- 
demic Standing. 

7. For graduation the student must earn an 
overall average of 2.0 or better considering 
work taken at all colleges, computed in 
such manner that a course will be counted 
only once, regardless of the number of 
times that it has been repeated. The grade 
earned in the last attempt will determine the 
number of honor points assigned for grad- 
uation. Additionally, the student must earn 
a GPA of 2.0 or better in each of the 
following: 

A. all work at Armstrong 

B. all courses in the major field. 

8. To qualify for a second baccalaureate 
degree, a candidate must earn at Arm- 
strong at least 45 additional hours of credit 
and meet all qualitative requirements for 
the degree. 

9. Before a degree will be conferred students 
must pay all fees and must submit to the 
Registrar a completed "Application for Grad- 
uation" two quarters before graduation. A 
candidate for a degree, unless excused in 



writing by the President, Vice President and 

Dean of Faculty, or Dean of Student Affairs, 

must attend the graduation exercises at 

which a degree is to be conferred. 

10. All students must successfully complete 

the Regents' Test and must take an Exit 

Examination in their major field as may be 

stipulated as requirements for graduation. 

Candidates for a second baccalaureate 

degree are exempted from the Regents' 

Test requirement. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for full-time stu- 
dents is 1 5-1 8 quarter hours including a course 
in physical education duringthe freshman and 
sophomore years. 

A full-time student is defined as one who is 
registered for 1 2 or more quarter hours. A part- 
time student is one registered for fewer than 1 2 
quarter hours. A student should plan about ten 
hours preparation per week for each 5 quarter 
hour course. 

Classification of Students 

A student who has earned fewer than 45 
quarter hours will be classified as a freshman; 
between 45 and 89 a sophomore; between 90 
and 134 as a junior; and 135 or more as a 
senior. 

Overloads and Courses 
At Other Colleges 

Permission to enroll for more than 1 8 quarter 
hours will be granted by the Registrar to a 
student: 

1 . with an average grade of "B" for full-time 
enrollment in the preceding quarter, or 

2. with an overall grade-point average of 3.0, 
or 

3. requiring an extra course in one of the two 
quarters prior to graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for 
more than 21 quarter hours. A student who is 
on academic probation will not be permitted to 
register for more than 1 8 quarter hours. Excep- 
tions to these limitations may be made only by 
the appropriate Dean. 

A student enrolled at Armstrong who at the 
same time takes courses for credit at another 
college may not transfer such credit to Arm- 
strong, unless written permission from the 
appropriate Dean has been obtained. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



21 



Reports and Grades 

Grade reports are issued directly to stu- 
dents at the end of each quarter The following 
grades are used in the determination of grade- 
point-averages: 

Grade Honor Points 

A (excellent) 4.0 

B (good) 3.0 

C (satisfactory) 2.0 

D (Dassing) 1.0 

F (failure) 0.0 

WF (withdrew, failing) 0.0 

The cumulative GPA is determined by divid- 
ing the total honor points earned by the total 
hours attempted at Armstrong State College. 
The adjusted GPA is determined by dividing 
thetotal honor points earned by the total hours 
attempted, with hours and honor points for 
repeated courses not duplicated in the calcu- 
lation. 

Armstrong State College also uses the fol- 
lowing symbols for grade reports. These sym- 
bols carry no honor points and are not included 
in the determination of either the cumulative 
GPA or the adjusted GPA. 

Symbol Explanation 

W withdrew, no penalty 

I incomplete 

S satisfactory 

U unsatisfactory 

V audit 

K credit by examination 

P passing 

An "I" which has not been removed by the 
niddle of the succeeding quarter is changed 
o an "F" unless the instructor recommends an 
extension in writing addressed to the appro- 
>ropriate Dean. The "S" and "U" symbols may 
)e utilized for completion of degree require- 
nents other than academic course work (such 
is student teaching, clinical practice, etc.). With- 
Jrawal without penalty (W) is not permitted 
after the quarterly dates listed as the dates for 
nid-term. Exceptions to this policy must be 
approved by the Vice President and Dean of 
: aculty and will be approved only on the basis 
)f hardship. Appeals for a change of grade 
nay be initiated through the head of the 
ippropriate academic department in accor- 
lance with the Regulations of Armstrong State 

ollege. 



Honors 

Dean's List Students enrolled for at least ten 
quarter hours of course work who earn an 
honor point average of at least 3 6 will be 
placed on the Dean's List Only course work 
taken at Armstrong will be used in the compu- 
tation of Dean's List honors. 

CumLaude: Those students graduating with 
an honor point average of 3.2 through 3 499 
will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students grad- 
uating with an honor point average of 3.5 
through 3.799 will be graduated magna cum 
laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students gradu- 
ated with an honor point average of 3.8 through 
4.0 will be graduated summa cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other 
accredited institutions will be considered in 
computing honors for graduation. 



Attendance 

The control of student attendance at class 
meetings and the effect of attendance on the 
grades in a course are left to the discretion of 
the instructor. 

A student is responsible for knowing every- 
thingthat is announced, discussed, or lectured 
upon in class as well as for mastering all 
assigned reading. A student is also responsi- 
ble for submitting on time all assignments and 
tests, recitations and unannounced quizzes. 

The instructor will be responsible for inform- 
ing each class at its first meeting what consti- 
tutes excessive absence in that particular 
class. Each student is responsible for knowing 
the attendance regulation and for complying 
with it. An instructor may drop a student from 
any class with a grade of "W" or "WF," as 
appropriate, if in the instructor's judgment the 
student's absences have been excessive. 



Academic Standing 

The college recognizes four academic cate- 
gories: Good Standing, Good Standing with 
Warning, Academic Probation, and Academic 
Suspension. Students are expected to main- 
tain or exceed the grade point average (GPA) 
as indicated in the chart below. 



22 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Quarter Hours Attempted Required Adjusted 
at Armstrong and Elsewhere GPA 



0-15 


13 


16-30 


1.4 


31-45 


1.5 


46-60 


16 


61-75 


17 


76-90 


1.8 


91-120 


1.9 


121 and over 


2.0 



A student who falls below the required GPA 
for the first time is placed on Good Standing 
with Warning. Failure to raise the adjusted 
GPA to the required level during the next quar- 
ter will result in Academic Probation. Students 
on Academic Probation are not in Good Stand- 
ing. If the student's adjusted GPA is raised to 
the required level, the student is returned to 
Good Standing. The second or any subse- 
quent failure to meet the required GPA will 
result in Academic Probation. Students on 
Academic Probation should plan both curricu- 
lar and extracurricular activities under the gui- 
dance of their advisors. 

Students on Academic Probation who fail to 
achieve the required adjusted GPA, but who 
do earn an average of at least 2.0 during the 
probationary quarter, will be continued on 
Academic Probation for the next quarter of 
attendance. Students on Academic Probation 
who neither achieve the required adjusted 
GPA nor earn at least a 2.0 average during the 
probationary quarter will be placed on Aca- 
demic Suspension from the college for one 
quarter. A student on Academic Suspension 
for the first time has the option of attending 
summer school without having to appeal the 
suspension. 

A student suspended for academic reasons 
for the first or second time may appeal by letter 
to the Committee on Admissions and Aca- 
demic Standing. This letter should state the 
nature of any extenuating circumstances relat- 
ing to the academic deficiency, and must be 
delivered to the office of Student Affairs no 
later than 9 AM of registration day. The deci- 
sion of the Committee on Admissions and 
Academic Standing is final. 

A student re-entering the college after an 
Academic Suspension is placed on Academic 
Probation and must meet the requirements 
listed above. A third Academic Suspension is 
final. 



Repeating Courses 

Any course may be repeated with the las 
grade to be counted in the adjusted GPA. / 
student who repeats any course should com 
plete a "Notice of Course Repetition" torn 
available in the Office of the Registrar. 

Dropping Courses 

A student desiring to drop a course after th( 
quarter has begun must obtain a Drop-Ad( 
Notice in the Office of the Registrar. The notice 
must be signed by the instructor of the course 
being dropped and returned by the student t( 
the Office of the Registrar. 

A student who drops a course not more thar 
seven class days after the course begins wil 
receive no grade for the course. A student wh( 
drops a course after the first seven class day; 
and on or before the quarterly dates listed fo 
mid-terms will receive a "W" or a "WF" depend 
ing on the status in the course. A student ma> 
not drop a course without penalty following the 
quarterly dates listed for mid-term. A student i: 
not allowed to drop ENG 101,1 02, or 201 a 
anytime unless extenuating circumstance; 
prevail. In order to drop one of these courses 
the drop form must be authorized by the Vice 
President and Dean of Faculty or a designatec 
representative. 

Withdrawing from College 

Any student who finds it necessary to with 
draw from college must begin the process ir 
the Office of Student Affairs. A formal withdraw 
al is required to ensure that the student ii 
eligible to return to Armstrong State College a 
a future date. Any refund to which a student i< 
entitled will be considered on the basis of the 
date which appears on the withdrawal form. 

Auditing Courses 

A regular student wishing to audit a course 
without receiving credit must obtain permis 
sion of the instructor before registering for the 
course. During the registration process the 
student should request to audit. A student ma} 
not change from audit to credit status or fronr 
credit to audit status after completing the pro- 
cess of registration for a course. A student whc 
audits a course will have a "V" recorded foi 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



23 



!hat course The regular schedule of fees ap- 
plies to auditors Unauthorized auditing is pro- 
hibited 

Honor Code 

The Honor Code at Armstrong State College 
is dedicated to the proposition that the protec- 
:ion of the grading system is in the interest of 
:he student community. The Student Court is 
an institutional means to assure that the stu- 
jent community shall have primary disposition 
Df infractions of the Honor Code and that stu- 
jents accused of such infractions shall enjoy 
hose procedural guarantees traditionally con- 
sidered essential to fair and impartial hearing, 
he foremost of which is the presumption of 
nnocence until guilt be established beyond a 
easonable doubt 

Responsibilities of students: 

All students must agree to abide by the 
rules of the Honor Code. A student shall 
not be accepted at Armstrong State Col- 
lege unless he or she signs a statement 
affirming his understanding of this agree- 
ment. The Honor Code shall be printed in 
the official bulletin and the Student Hand- 
book. 

It will be the responsibility of the Stu- 
dent Court or its designated representa- 
tive to conduct an orientation program at 
the beginning of each quarter for all 
newly entering students to explain fully 
the Honor Code and to allow full discus- 
sion of its requirements. 

Any student desiring assistance with 
any matter related to the Honor Code is 
invited to seek assistance in the Office of 
Student Affairs. 
Violations of the Honor Code: 

Violations of the Honor Code may be of 
two kinds: (a) general and (b) those 
related to the peculiarities of specific 
course-related problemsandto the under- 
standing of individual instructors. Any 
instructor whose conception of cheating 
would tend to enlarge or contract the 
general regulations defining cheating must 
explicitly notify the affected students of 
the qualifications to the general regula- 
tions which he or she wishes to stipulate. 
The following will be considered general 
violations of the Honor Code. 
1. Giving or receiving any unauthorized 
help on any assignment, test or paper. 
The meaning of unauthorized help 
shall be made clear by the instructor 



of each class 

2 Stealing when related to cheating 

3 Plagiarizing 

4 Giving perjured testimony before the 
Student Court 

5. Suborning, attempting to suborn, or 
intimidating witnesses 

6 Failing to report a suspected violation 
of the Honor Code 
III Reporting Violations of the Honor Code 
Anyone wishing to report a violation 

may come to the Office of Student Affairs 

for assistance in contacting members of 

the Student Court 

A Self-reporting: A student who has bro- 
ken the Honor Code should report 
himself to a member of the Student 
Court. 

B Anyone (faculty member or student) 
who is aware of a violation of the 
Honor Code must report the matter 
This may be done in one of two ways: 

1 . Tell the person thought to be guilty 
to report himself to a member of 
the Student Court no later than the 
end of the next school day. After 
this designated time the person 
who is aware of the violation must 
inform a member of the Student 
Court so that the Student Court 
may contact the accused person if 
he has not already reported himself. 

2. Report the suspected violation di- 
rectly to a member of the Student 
Court without informing the ac- 
cused. 

IV. The procedural rights of the students 
accused of violations of the Honor Code: 
The essence of the procedural rights of 
an accused is the right to a fair and impar- 
tial hearing and the right to be presumed 
innocent until proven guilty. Specific rights 
are as follows: 

1 . The accused will be notified in writing 
by the Student Court or its designated 
representative of the nature and details 
of the offense with which he is charged 
along with the names of his accusers 
and the principal witnesses to be 
brought against him. This notification 
shall occur no less than three days 
prior to the date of the hearing. 

2. The accused has the right to counsel 
of his own choosing. Such counsel will 
not participate directly in the proceed- 
ings except to advise his client. It is 
expected that such counsel will be 



24 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



drawn from the college community. 

3. The accused and the person bringing 
the charges shall be afforded an oppor- 
tunity to present witnesses and doc- 
umentary or other evidence. The ac- 
cused and any individual bringing the 
charges shall have the right to cross 
examine all witnesses and may, where 
the witnesses cannot appear because 
of illness or other cause acceptable to 
the Court, present the sworn state- 
ment of the witnesses. The Court shall 
not be bound by formal rules govern- 
ing the presentation of evidence, and 
it may consider any evidence pre- 
sented which is of probative value in 
the case. 

4. The accused may not be made to bear 
witness against himself. The Court 
may not take the refusal of the accused 
to testify as evidence of guilt, but this 
proviso does not give the accused 
immunity from a hearing orfrom recom- 
mendations reached in a hearing 
simply because the accused does not 
testify. 

5. The accused shall have access to a 
complete audiotape of the hearing 
and to the record prepared by the 
secretary. 

6. The substantive facts of a case may 
be re-opened for consideration upon 
initiation of the accused acting through 
normal appeal channels. The accused 
shall not be put in double jeopardy. 

7. All witnesses will be sequestered from 
the hearing room during the course of 
a hearing. Witnesses may not discuss 
a pending case. 

8. By prior agreement, the accused will 
be allowed such observers of the 
hearing as may be commensurate 
with the space available. Otherwise, in 
the interests of the right of privacy of 
the accused, hearings will be private, 
except that the College may also have 
observers additional to the advisors to 
the Student Court. 

V. The Student Conduct Committee, the 
Student Court and Advisors to the Stu- 
dent Court: 
A. Student Conduct Committee 

1. The Student Conduct Committee 
shall be responsible to the faculty 
for recommending policies relating 
to the Academic Honor Code and 
the Code of Conduct, for formulat- 



ing or approving rules, enforce- 
ment procedures, and sanction* 
within the framework of existinc 
policies, and for recommendinc 
changes in the administration o 
any aspects of the Honor Code 
and the Student Code of Conduct 
The Conduct Committee will als( 
interview and select members fo 
the Student Court. 

2. The Committee shall consist of five 
teaching faculty members, the Dear 
of Student Affairs and four stu 
dents. The four students will be the 
President and Vice-President o 
the Student Court, the President o 
the Student Government Associa 
tion, and one student-at-large. The 
faculty members shall be appointee 
by the faculty in accordance witr 
the faculty statutes. 

3. The Dean of Student Affairs shal 
assist the Conduct Committee ir 
the development of policy and ir 
the discharge of its responsibili 
ties. He shall coordinate the activi 
ties of all officials, committees 
student groups, and tribunals fo 
student conduct. 

4. All regulations or rules relating t( 
student conduct that are proposec 
by any College official, committee 
or student group, and for whicf 
sanctions may be imposed in the 
name of the College, must be sub 
mitted to the Committee for con 
sideration and review prior to sub 
mission to the faculty and the stu 
dent body. The Committee shal 
have 10 days in which to reviev 
the same. 

B. Student Court 

1. The Student Court will be selectee 
by the Student Conduct Commit 
tee and will be composed of twelve 
students. Due consideration will be 
given to equitable apportionmen 
of court members on the basis o 
academic class, race, and sex 
Students on academic probatior 
may not serve. All appointment; 
will be issued and accepted in writ 
ing. Appointments will be made 
during Spring Quarter in time fo 
newly elected members of the Cour 
to assume their duties by May 1 
Appointments will be made as 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



25 



needed to keep the Student Court 
staffed to do business on a rea- 
sonably prompt basis These ap- 
pointments may constitute perma- 
nent or temporary replacements 
as the Student Conduct Commit- 
tee deems necessary. 
2 The Student Court will elect a Pres- 
ident, Vice-President, and a Secre- 
tary from its membership. The Presi- 
dent will preside at all meetings. 
The Vice-President will assume 
the duties of the President if the 
President is absent. The Secretary 
will maintain written notes of all 
proceedings and audiotape records 
of all testimony, and will maintain 
exhibits of evidence which by their 
nature may reasonably be main- 
tained in the Court files. A quorum 
of the Court shall consist of seven 
members. A two-thirds majority 
secret ballot vote is required to 
reach a finding of guilty. All other 
questions may be decided by a 
simple majority vote. 

3. Constituency of the Student Court 
during the Summer Quarter shall 
include all appointed members in 
attendance, and others shall be VI. 
appointed to membership by the 
Student Conduct Committee. 

4. Student Court members shall exam- 
ine their consciences carefully to 
determine whether they can in good 
conscience serve on a panel hear- 
ing a particular case, and in the 
event that there is any doubt, what- 
soever, such members shall excuse 
themselves from duty on the spe- 
cific panel in question. 

Advisors to the Court 

1 . An advisor and an associate advi- 
sor to the Student Court shall be 
appointed by the President of the 
College. 

2. Ordinarily the advisor will serve in 
that office for one year only and 
usually will be succeeded in that 
position by the associate advisor. 
Therefore, after the initial appoint- 
ments, only an associate advisor 
will ordinarily be appointed each 
year. The succession of an asso- 
ciate to the advisor position is 
deemed to occur on the last day of 
Spring Quarter. If, for any reason, 



the advisor is unable to complete 
his term, the associate advisor 
shall succeed to the office of advi- 
sor and another associate advisor 
shall be appointed by the above 
procedures If, during the Summer 
Quarter, neither advisor is on cam- 
pus, a temporary advisor will be 
appointed. 
3. Duties of the advisor and the asso- 
ciate advisor: It shall be the duty of 
the advisor to consult with the 
Court and to offer advice to the 
President and members of the Court 
on substantive and procedural ques- 
tions. The advisor, or the associate 
advisor in the event the advisor is 
unable to attend, shall be present 
at all meetings and hearings of the 
Court. The advisor may not vote 
nor may he participate directly in 
the conduct of hearings before the 
Court except through the chair- 
man, or acting chairman, of the 
Court. The advisor should be gov- 
erned at all times by the principle 
that a hearing before the Student 
Court is primarily a matter of stu- 
dent responsibility. 
Procedures and Penalties adopted by the 
Student Court. 

The Student Court shall formulate its 
own bylaws governing internal organiza- 
tion and procedure. Such bylaws must be 
consistent with the Honor Code. 

A. Hearings shall be called by the Court 
President to be held on a date not less 
than three nor more than ten class 
days after notice to the accused as 
provided in Section IV-2. Exceptions 
to these time requirements may be 
granted. 

B. Upon reaching a finding of guilty, the 
Court shall make a recommendation 
to the Vice President of the College as 
to the administrative action it deems 
appropriate within the following limita- 
tions: 

1. A minimum penalty shall be loss of 
assignment or test credit for the 
assignment or test for violations 
involving cheating as specified in 
Section II, subsections 1 , 2, and 3. 
Additional penalties such as repri- 
mands, suspension, or others may 
be recommended for any aspects 
of Section II. 



26 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



2. Maximum penalty for a first offense 
of any type shall be suspension for 
a full calendar year. 

3. Maximum penalty for a second 
offense may be suspension for 
three years. 

C. Immediately following a hearing, the 
accused will be informed of the Court's 
finding, and its recommendation to 
the Vice President of the College. If 
the finding is guilty, the accused will 
be informed that the Court may re- 
open the case with the consent of the 
accused for good cause, within a 
three week period. 

D. The Vice President of the College will 
inform all involved persons in writing 
of the action he has taken in view of 
Court recommendation. The Court Sec- 
retary will post public notice of the 
Vice President's action by case number 
without identifying the accused. 

VII. Appeals of Findings and Penalties: 

Should a student have cause to ques- 
tion the findings of the Court or the action 
of the Vice President of the College or 
both, he has the right to appeal. The 
channels of appeal are as follows: 
A. Court findings and/or the administra- 
tive action of the Vice President of the 
College may be appealed within five 
days by writing the President of the 
College. Further appeal procedures 
will conform to the appeal procedures 
of the College and of the Policies of 
the Board of Regents, University Sys- 
tem of Georgia. 

VIII. Supervision of the Student Court: 

As an institutional means of respond- 
ing to reported infractions of the Honor 
Code, the Student Court is ultimately 
responsible to the President of the College. 

Supervision of the Student Court will be 
accomplished ordinarily through the Dean 
of Student Affairs and the Advisors. 

In accordance with Article VI, Section 
F, of the College Statutes, the Dean of 
Student Affairs will provide general super- 
vision of the Student Court and will pro- 
vide other guidance or services as di- 
rected by the President of the College. 

IX. Revision of the Honor Code will require 
confirmation by the majority vote of those 
faculty and student body members voting. 



Application 



The Application Fee of $10.00 is paid I 
each student at the time of initial acceptan< 
for admission to Armstrong State College. Tl 
acceptance of the Application Fee does n 
constitute acceptance of the student. This f< 
is not refundable. 

Matriculation 

The Matriculation Fee for students registe 
ing on campus for the normal course load 
fifteen hours is 247.00. Students carrying few 
than 12 credit hours on campus in a quarl 
will pay at the rate of 21 .00 per quarter hour 
Matriculation Fees. Students who register 1 
off-campus credit hours will pay at the rate 
26.00 per credit hour. Matriculation fees a 
waived for residents of Georgia upon prese 
tation of written documentation that they a 
62 years of age or older. 

Out-of-State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee 
495.00 per quarter in addition to all regul 
fees. Students carrying fewer than 12 ere 
hours in a quarter who are not legal resider 
of the State of Georgia will pay at the rate 
41 .00 per quarter hours an Out-of-State Fee 
addition to regular fees. Students who regisl 
for off-campus credit courses will pay at t 
rate of 41.00 per quarter hour Out-of-Sta 
Fee in addition to all regular fees. Out-of-Sta 
tuition fees are waived for active duty milita 
personnel and their dependents stationed 
Georgia, except military personnel assigned 
this institution for educational purposes. 

Residency Requirements 

To be considered a legal resident of Gee 

gia, the applicant must establish the followir 

facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar. 

1 . (a) If a person is 1 8 years of age or old< 

(s)he may register as a resident stude 

only upon a showing that (s)he has beer 

legal resident of Georgia for a period of 

least twelve months immediately precei 

ing the date of registration. 

(b) No emancipated minor or person 1 

years of age or older shall be deemed 

have gained or acquired in-state rei 

dence status for fee purposes while atten 



FEES 



27 



mg any educational institution in this State, 
in the absence of a clear demonstration 
that (s)he has in fact established legal 
residence in this State 

I If a person is under 1 8 years of age, (s)h 
may register as a resident student only 
upon a showing that a supporting parent 
or guardian has been a legal resident of 
Georgia for a period of at least twelve 
months immediately preceding the date of 
registration. 

3. A person stationed in Georgia who is on 
full-time, active military duty with the armed 
forces and a spouse and dependent chil- 
dren may register upon payment of resi- 
dent fees even though they have not been 
legal residents of Georgia for the preced- 
ing twelve months. 

\. A full-time employee of the University Sys- 
tem and spouse and dependent children 
may register on the payment of resident 
fees even though (s)he has not been a 
legal resident of Georgia for the twelve 
months. 

5. Non-resident graduate students who hold 
teaching or research assistantships requir- 
ing at least one-third time service may 
register as students in the institution in 
which they are employed on payment of 
resident fees. 

». Full-time teachers in the public schools of 
Georgia and their dependent children may 
enroll as students in the University System 
institutions on the payment of resident 

1 fees. 
All aliens shall be classified as non- 
residents; provided, however, that an alien 
who is living in this country under a visa 
permitting permanent residence shall have 
the same privilege of qualifying for resi- 
dent status for fee purposes as a citizen of 
the United States. 

Foreign students who attend institutions of 
the University System underfinancial spon- 
sorship of civic or religious groups located 
in this State, may be enrolled upon the 
payment of resident fees, provided the 
number of such foreign students in any 
one institution does not exceed the quota 
approved by the Board of Regents for that 
institution. 

If the parents or legal guardian of a minor 
change the legal residence to another 
state following a period of legal residence 
in Georgia, the minor may continue to take 
courses for a period of twelve months on 
the payment of resident fees. After the 



expiration of the twelve month period the 
student may continue his registration only 
upon the payment of fees at the non- 
resident rate 
10 In the event that a legal resident of Geor- 
gia is appointed as guardian of a non- 
resident minor, such minor will not be 
permitted to register as a resident student 
until the expiration of one year from the 
date of court appointment, and then only 
upon proper showing that such appoint- 
ment was not made to avoid payment of 
the non-resident fees. 

Residency Reclassification 

A student is responsible for registering under 
the proper residency classification. A student 
classified as a nonresident who believes that 
he/she is entitled to be reclassified as a legal 
resident may petition the Registrar for a change 
in status. The petition must be filed no later 
than sixty (60) days after the quarter begins in 
order for the student to be considered for re- 
classification for the quarter. If the petition is 
granted, reclassification will not be retroactive 
to prior quarters. The necessary forms for this 
purpose are available in the Registrar's office. 

Student Activity and 
Health/Service 

There will be a Student Activity Fee ($1 7.50) 
and a Health/Service Fee ($2.50) for all stu- 
dents enrolled for six or more hours. Students 
who are enrolled for five hours or fewer may 
choose whether or not to pay the Student 
Activity Fee. Students who choose not to do so 
will be accorded limited student activity priv- 
ileges. 

Athletic 

There will be an Athletic Fee of $1 5.00 per 
quarter for all students. 



Applied Music 



L 



Applied music courses consist of one twenty- 
five minute private lesson per week (Music 
1 30) or a fifty minute private lesson per week 
(Music 140, 240, 340, 440). A special fee of 
$37.50 for Music 1 30 or $75.00 for Music 1 40- 
440 is charged quarterly to students who are 
not music majors, to music majors enrolled for 
less than ten hours, and to music majors 
enrolled for more than one applied course. The 
applied music fee is refundable only if the stu- 
dent does not meet the first scheduled lesson. 



28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Identification Card 

Students registering for their first quarter of 
the academic year are required to pay a fee of 
$1.00 for their student I. D. card. This ID is valid 
for the remainder of the academic year. 

Late Registration 

A late registration fee of $10.00 will be 
charged to students registering after the regis- 
tration period. This fee is not refundable. 

Graduation 

A Graduation Fee of $25.00 will be collected 
from each candidate for graduation. If the 
candidate is receiving a second degree at the 
same graduation ceremonies an additional fee 
of $5.00 will be collected. The fee will be 
$25.00 for a second degree awarded at a sub- 
sequent graduation ceremony. 



Transcript 



Each student is entitled to one official tran- 
script of his college work. The charge for addi- 
tional copies is $2.00 each. 

Privilege 

Application Fee $1 0.00 

Late Registration $1 0.00 

Graduation Fee $25.00 

Transcript, first one free, each 

additional $ 2.00 

Applied Music Fee $37.50/$75.00 

Dental Hygiene Deposit (at application, 

non-refundable) $50.00 

Summary of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter $247.00 

Student Activity, per quarter $ 1 7.50 

Health/Service, per quarter $ 2.50 

Athletic, per quarter $ 1 5.00 

Total for Georgia Residents . . . $282.00 
Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter . . . $495.00 

Total for Non-Residents $777.00 

Matriculation Part-Time Students, 
per quarter hour $21 .00 

Non-Resident Tuition, Part-Time Students, 
per quarter hour (in addition to Matricu- 
lation Fee) $41 .00 

Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each quarter when 
the course is scheduled by the College. 



Students who formally withdraw from a short 
course or conference before its first meeting 
will receive a full refund of fees paid provided 
the withdrawal is in writing and is received by 
the Joint Continuing Education Center prior to 
the first class meeting of the course or confer- 
ence. Withdrawals made in writing after the 
first class meeting will be given a refund minus 
a ten dollar handling fee. No refunds will be 
made for withdrawals received after the second 
class meeting. Fees paid for courses or con- 
ferences cancelled by the Joint Continuing 
Education Center will be refunded 100%. 

Off-Campus Courses 

An additional fee of $5.00 per quarter hour is 
charged for off-campus courses. Students tak- 
ing only off-campus courses are not required 
to pay Student Activity, Health Service, I.D., or 
Athletic fees. The total fees for each five hour 
course is $130.00. 

Refunds 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon writ- 
ten application for withdrawal from school. No 
refunds will be made to students dropping a 
course. Privilege fees are not refundable. Stu- 
dents who formally withdraw on the date of 
scheduled registration or during one week fol- 
lowing the scheduled registration date are 
entitled to a refund of 80% of the fees paid for 
that quarter. Students who formally withdraw 
during the period between one and two weeks 
after the scheduled registration date are 
entitled to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for 
that quarter. Students who formally withdraw 
between two and three weeks after the sched-l 
uled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 40% of the fees paid for that quarter. Stu-j 
dents who formally withdraw during the periocj 
between three and four weeks after the sched- 
uled registration date are entitled to a refunc 
of 20% of the fees paid for that quarter. Stu- 
dents who withdraw after a period of foul 
weeks has elapsed from the scheduled regis- 
tration date will be entitled to no refund of an) 
part of the fees paid that quarter. 

Financial Obligations 

Any student delinquent in the payment o 
any financial obligation to the College will havi 
grade reports and transcripts of records en 
cumbered. Grade reports and transcripts wi 
not be released, nor will the student be allowei 
to re-register at the college until all financie 



FINANCIAL AID 



29 



obligations are met. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at 
the time of registration 

If a check is not paid on presentation to the 
bank on which it is drawn, the student's regis- 
tration will be cancelled and the student may 
re-register only on payment of a service charge 
of $5.00 or five percent of the check, which- 
ever is greater, and the late registration fee. 

Notice of Fee Changes 

Fees and Charges are subject to change at 
the end of any quarter. 

FINANCIAL AID 



Governing Principles 

Armstrong State College subscribes to the 
principle that the primary purpose of a student 
financial aid program is to provide financial 
assistance to students who without such assis- 
tance would be unable to attend college. The 
primary responsibility for financing a college 
education is the inherent obligation of the stu- 
dent and/or family. Financial assistance from 
Armstrong State College should be viewed as 
supplementary to the efforts of the student 
and/ or family. An assessment of parental abil- 
ity to contribute toward the student's educa- 
tional expenses is made by the College Scho- 
larship Service so that neither the parent, the 
(Student, nor Armstrong State College be re- 
quired to bear an undue share of the financial 
responsibility. 

General Information 

j Financial assistance is distributed both direct- 
ly and indirectly to eligible students from the 
federal, state, and local governments and from 
private donors through the Office of Student 
rinancial Aid. Assistance is provided directly 
When the name of the recipient and the 
[amount of assistance to be given are deter- 
inined prior to the receipt of the funds by the 
jbollege. Assistance is provided indirectly when 
|:unds are given to the College for general dis- 
tribution to students who are determined to be 
eligible for receipt of these funds. In both 
:ases, it is the responsibility of the Office of 
Student Financial Aid to insure that the recip- 
ient has met all requirements and regulations 
j concerning the receipt of such funds. Students 
jjvho are found to be in violation of require- 
ments and regulations concerning the receipt 



Of financial assistance may jeoparc 
continued eligibility for participation m the 
financial aid program It Is the student's respn 
bility to be knowledgeable about all require 
ments governing the receipt of funds from 
each program from which the student receives 
financial assistance. 

Student financial aid is awarded to eligible 
students on the basis of need in nearly all 
cases except scholarships which have been 
provided by donors for the purpose of recog- 
nizing academic promise or achievement. The 
determination of need is provided for Arm- 
strong State College students through the use 
of the Financial Aid Form (FAF) and the Col- 
lege Scholarship Service which processes 
this form. The process involves an analysis of 
the data provided by the student's family or, if 
independent, by the student. This analysis is 
sent to the Office of Student Financial Aid 
where it is compared with the cost of educa- 
tion for the appropriate classification of stu- 
dent. If the analysis shows that the family con- 
tribution or self contribution is less than the 
cost of education, financial need has been 
established. The Office of Student Financial 
Aid has the legal right to challenge information 
provided on the Financial Aid Form if, in the 
opinion of the financial aid officer, that informa- 
tion appears to be inaccurate, incorrect, or 
misleading. Information relating to a student's 
eligibility is available to that student when 
he/she has completed all the necessary re- 
quirements for processing his/her financial 
aid application at the College. 

There are two basic student classifications: 
(1 ) dependent student who is a commuter (liv- 
ing with parents or guardian) or resident (not 
living with parents or guardian, but either 
receiving financial support from them or 
claimed by them as a tax deduction); (2) inde- 
pendent student who is single (and totally self- 
supporting) or married (or who is a single par- 
ent with one or more children). Each classifica- 
tion constitutes a cost of education group from 
which eligibility for financial aid is derived. An 
example of the cost of education for a depen- 
dent commuter student for one year would be: 

Tuition and fees $847 

Books and supplies 240 

Room and board 800 

Transportation 405 

Personal expense 675 

TOTAL $2,967 

The cost of tuition and all pertinent fees, and 
the refund policy of the College, are outlined in 
the "Fees" section of this Catalog. 



30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



In general, students who enter the College 
at the beginning of the Fall Quarter have a 
greater opportunity to receive financial assis- 
tance than those who enter later in the aca- 
demic year. The awards processing time usu- 
ally runs from June 1 to August 31 . It is during 
this period that the Office of Student Financial 
Aid distributes its yearly allocation of funds to 
students who have completed the process 
cycle. In the event that there is a shortage of 
funds, students who are eligible for financial 
aid but whose applications were late will be 
placed on a waiting list until such time as funds 
become available. 

Every eligible student has a right to receive 
financial assistance provided that (1) funds 
are available at the College for award to the 
student; (2) the student meets the require- 
ments pertinent to the program(s) from which 
assistance is sought; (3) the student has been 
admitted to the College, or in the case of an 
enrolled student, meets the standards of satis- 
factory academic progress as outlined in the 
"Academic Regulations" section of this Cata- 
log. In addition, it isthe student's responsibility 
to adhere to all regulations and requirements 
heretofore mentioned and to notify the Office 
of Student Financial Aid of any change in sta- 
tus which would have any effect on the legiti- 
macy of financial assistance being received. 

Student Retention. Information regarding 
student retention (i.e., enrollment patterns at 
the College) may be obtained upon request 
from the Office of the Registrar. Copies of this 
information are available to the student at a 
cost of $1 .00 per copy. Information regarding 
specific degree programs is available in this 
Catalog and from the Head of the Department 
in which a specific academic program is 
offered. 

Application Information 

An applicant for student financial aid must: 

1. Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at 
the College; 

2. Obtain, complete, and submit a Financial 
Aid Form (FAF) to the College Scholarship 
Service by June 30 preceding the next aca- 
demic year. 

3. Submit a PELL GRANT Student Aid Report 
to the Office of Student Financial Aid by 
June 30 preceding the next academic year. 

4. Complete and submit the Request for Stu- 
dent Financial Aid Form. 

5. Submit a copy of the previous year's Income 
Tax Return (IRS). 



It may be necessary to complete additional 
forms depending on a student's year in school, 
major course of study, and/or eligibility for a 
particular program. Applications for financial 
assistance must be repeated annually. Most 
student financial aid awards are for the entire 
academic year, with payments made to the 
student in equal quarterly installments. A stu- 
dent may, however, apply and be considered 
for financial assistance during the academic 
year, if funds are available. 

All student financial aid awards are contin- 
gent upon the availability of funds and the recip- 
ient's maintaining satisfactory progress toward 
a degree as defined in this Catalog. 

The minimum number of quarter hours for 
which a student financial aid recipient may 
enroll per quarter varies from program to pro- 
gram. Some require at least 1 2 hours per quar- 
ter (full-time status). All programs require that 
the student be enrolled at least half-time, tak- 
ing 6 or more quarter hours. 

Students applying for financial aid, whether 
eligible or not, who do not meet or adhere to 
the above requirements will not be considered 
for financial aid. It is the responsibility of the 
parents and/or student to determine that all 
pertinent information and data have been 
obtained and are located in the Office of Stu- 
dent Financial Aid to assure a complete and 
accurate awarding of financial assistance. 

When the student has received acknowl- 
edgement from the College Scholarship Ser- 
vice that the Financial Aid Form (FAF) has 
been sent to the College and the student has 
delivered the PELL Grant Aid Report (SAR) 
and the Request for Student Financial Aid, the 
Office of Student Financial Aid will send the 
student a tentative award notice. The student 
should schedule an appointment with a finan- 
cial aid advisor. The advisor will discuss the 
student's financial aid package and a final 
award letter indicating the type of award(s) 
and amount(s) will be processed. 

Students who submit the PELL Grant Stu- 
dent Aid Report only will not be considered for 
any other type of financial assistance awarded 
by the College. 

Transfer Students 

In addition to the above requirements for all 
financial aid students, transfer students are 
required to submit a complete financial aid 
transcript from the financial aid office of each 
institution of higher education previously at- 
tended whether or not aid was received. No 



, 



FINANCIAL AID 



31 



awards will be made until these documents 
have been received by the Office of Student 
Financial Aid 

Categories of Aid 

The College provides necessary financial 
assistance through grants, scholarships, work, 
and/or loans Grants and scholarships are 
awards that require neither service nor cash 
repayments Opportunities for part-time employ- 
ment, usually on campus, are provided for eli- 
gible students who are paid federal minimum 
wages on an hourly basis. Loans require cash 
repayment, service repayment, or a combina- 
tion of both These funds are made available 
through the federal government, state govern- 
ment, and local sources. Students in the Con- 
tinuing Education, Exchange, and Transient 
classifications are not eligible for financial aid. 

Federal Assistance 

The Pell Grant Program is designed to pro- 
vide financial assistance to attend post-high 
school educational institutions. The Pell Grant 
award amounts vary, depending upon the stu- 
dent's eligibility, and unlike a loan, does not 
require repayment. 

The Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grant Program is available to eligible students 
who establish exceptional financial need as 
determined by the College Scholarship Ser- 
vice The minimum award is $200.00 per aca- 
demic year. 

The College Work-Study Program allows an 
[eligible student to work during the quarter. 
(Satisfactory work performance is mandatory. 
[The student must also maintain satisfactory 
[academic progress. A student on academic 
(suspension, even though readmitted on appeal 
(s not allowed to participate in the Work-Study 
' ^rogram. 

A National Direct Student Loan is no longer 

-available to students at the College. Students 

f needing to secure academic loans should (1 ) 

i f a resident of Georgia, inquire about the State 

Student Loan program, or (2) if a non-resident 

)f Georgia, contact the higher education cor- 

)oration in their state of residency. 

| State Assistance 

it Georgia Incentive Scholarships are awarded 
i o residents who began post-high school edu- 
i! nation after April 1 , 1 974, and whose eligibility 
\( "ias been determined by the College Scholar- 
hip Service financial analysis. All veterans 



r 



who were residents of Georgia at the time of 
their entry into military service may apply Stu- 
dents must also request submission of a I 
of the FAF to the State Scholarship Commis- 
sion All students applying for Georgia Incen- 
tive Scholarships are required to apply for a 
Pell Grant 

The Guaranteed Student Loan Program 
offers loans to eligible students through both 
local banks and its own agency For legal resi- 
dents to apply through the state, they must be 
denied loans by local lenders Students must 
complete the College Scholarship Service 
application to determine eligibility 

The Health Career Loan Program is availa- 
ble to legal residents formally admitted into 
health career degrees at the college. These 
loans are service cancellable upon graduation 
and employment within the state of Georgia 

The Board of Regents' Fund sponsors a 
program under which Georgia residents may 
qualify for financial assistance at units of the 
University System. Applicants must be in the 
upper 25% of their class and have established 
a financial need through the College Scholar- 
ship Service. Recipients must agree to work in 
the state, at an occupation for which they are 
qualified educationally, one year for each 
$1 ,000 received. If unable to meet this obliga- 
tion, the student is expected to repay the full 
amount with interest at the rate of 3 percent 
simple interest. 

Students may be recommended for employ- 
ment on the Institutional Work Study Program. 
Some departments and offices of the college 
have funds available to hire student workers. 
Initial contacts should be made by the student 
with the Director of Student Financial Aid. 

Local Assistance 

Institutional Short-Term Loans are available 
to students for a maximum of 60 days. These 
loans are used primarily to assist students with 
the payment of tuition and fees. These loans 
are available to eligible students for a maxi- 
mum of $1 50. Other requirements concerning 
short-term loans are available in the Office of 
Student Financial Aid. 

Government Benefits 

Social Security provides monthly benefits to 
children when a parent dies, starts receiving 
Social Security retirement, or starts receiving 
disability benefits. Because of changes in the 
law, students should contact the Social Secu- 
rity Office concerning eligibility. 



32 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Pro- 
gram provides financial assistance for the 
applicant who possesses an impairment which 
would prove to be a vocational handicap. Stu- 
dents who think that they may qualify under 
this program should contact the Vocational 
Rehabilitation Center located at 420 Mall Boule- 
vard. Applicants sponsored by Vocational Re- 
habilitation or other community agencies must 
apply at least six weeks before the beginning 
of any quarter to insure proper processing of 
applications. 

Veterans Information 

Veterans who served on active duty for 
other than training purposes for more than 1 80 
days, any part of which occurred after June 1 , 
1966, are eligible for financial assistance to 
attend college through the G.I. Bill. Generally, 
sons and daughters of veterans whose death 
or total disablement was a result of service in 
the armed forces are eligible for financial 
benefits under the veterans program for edu- 
cational assistance. 

A prospective student must first make appli- 
cation to the College and gain approval for 
admission from the Office of the Registrar/Di- 
rector of Admissions. A veteran cannot receive 
benefits while matriculating under a Continu- 
ing Education admission status. 

Once accepted, the veteran should go to the 
Office of Veteran Affairs and obtain an applica- 
tion for VA educational benefits. The veteran 
must submit to the Office of Veterans Affairs, 
an original DD 214 (or copy number four) and 
supporting documentation of dependency sta- 
tus (marriage certificate; divorce decree, if 
previously married; and birth certificates of all 
dependent children.) 

Students transferring from other educational 
institutions, OJT programs, or correspondence 
schools must complete a "Request for Change 
of Place of Training/Change of Program" VA 
Form 1 995 with the Armstrong Office of Veter- 
ans Affairs. At the time of initial matriculation 
each student/veteran must declare a specific 
program of study (major) and must follow the 
curriculum for this major without exception or 
benefits may be interrupted. Any student receiv- 
ing government benefits from the Veterans 
Administration must check with the Office of 
Veterans Affairs at the beginning of each quar- 
ter and file a form declaring the specific 
courses and number of credit hours which he 
is attempting. All student/veterans are re- 
minded that they must report any changes in 



attendance, i.e., dropping, adding or withdraw- 
al from school, to the Office of Veterans Af- 
fairs immediately following such action. Veter- 
ans entering school under the G.I. Bill should 
have sufficient funds to finance themselves 
until payments from the VA begin (approxi- 
mately six weeks after application). Student/ 
Veterans are also subject to The SATISFAC- 
TORY PROGRESS standards outlined in this 
section. 



Scholarships 



Armstrong State College accepts Scholar- 
ship applications throughout the year. Most 
awards are made annually during the summer. 
Scholarships are awarded when: 

1 . An agency notifies the College of its inten- 
tion to award a scholarship to a specified 
student, or 

2. An agency informs the College that it will 
award scholarships to a specific number of 
students selected by the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. 

Applicants for scholarships awarded by the 
college must: 

1 . Complete the initial application process for 
financial aid; 

2. Complete a separate scholarship applica- 
tion which may be obtained from the Office 
of Student Financial Aid; 

3. Have, as an entering freshman, a minimum 
combined verbal and mathematical SAT 
score of 1,000; 

4. Have, as a returning or transfer student, a 
minimum overall grade-point average of 
3.0. 

5. Unless otherwise specified, be a full-time 
student. 

Award notification will be given to those stu- 
dents selected at the end of the selection pro- 
cess. Contact the Office of Student Financial 
Aid for scholarship applications. 

Satisfactory Academic 
Progress 

For purpose of financial aid, a student is 
deemed to be making satisfactory progress 
toward a degree until such time as he/she is 
placed on academic suspension from the Col- 
lege. The student, upon his/her readmission 
to the College, must, in the first quarter after 
readmission, earn a 2.0 grade-point-average 
as a full time student, before he/she is again 
considered to be making satisfactory progress 



STUDENT SERVICES 



33 



toward a degree The award of financial aid will 
be suspended during this quarter 

Students who have attempted 1 10 hours in 
an associate degree program or 245 hours in a 
baccalaureate degree program are no longer 
considered to be making satisfactory aca- 
demic progress Students will automatically be 
removed from financial aid once either of 
these conditions has been met. Students may 
also be removed from financial aid if a pattern 
of course withdrawals is established. 



STUDENT SERVICES 
AND ACTIVITIES 



The Office of Student Affairs, administered 
by the Dean for Student Affairs and Develop- 
ment, provides myriad services and activities 
to foster the development of a well-rounded 
college experience. This catalog section in- 
cludes not only services and activities spon- 
sored by Student Affairs, but also those admin- 
istered by other campus offices and divisions 
which affect student academics and cultural 
life. 

Orientation 

The Summer Orientation Program (CHAOS), 
Communication, Help, Advisement, Orienta- 
tion and Service, is planned to aid students in 
their transition to college by exposing them to 
the dynamics of successful decision-making. 
Using techniques that encourage the realiza- 
tion of possible outcomes and consequences, 
students will learn to explore possibilities with 
more understanding and confidence. 

Freshmen participating in this program will 
be given information concerning student activ- 
ities programs, visit campus facilities, and plan, 
their class schedules with academic advisors. 

An abbreviated orientation program is sched- 
uled for students new to the college prior to 
registration Winter, Spring, and Summer Quar- 
ters. 



Counseling 



Counselors can assist students in clarifying 
educational and vocational obiectives, in d< 
opin e study skills and habits, and in 

dealing with problems of social and emotional 
significance 

The computerized systems of career guid- 
ance (SIG I) and study skills instruction (CASSI) 
are available through the Counseling and 
Placement Office. 



Testing 



Counselors are available to assist students 
m making successful and realistic decisions 
and in choosing appropriate routes for attain- 
ing selected goals. All discussions are confi- 
dential. 



The following testing programs are adminis- 
tered regularly by members of the counseling 
staff: ACT Proficiency Examination Program 
(PEP), College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP), Dental Admission Test (DAT). Dental 
Hygiene Aptitude Test, Graduate Record Exam- 
ination (GRE), Medical College Admission 
Test (MCAT), Miller Analogies Test (MAT). 
National Teacher Examinations (NTE). and 
the Regents' Testing Program. Information 
may be obtained about the Allied Health Pro- 
fessions Admission Test, Graduate Manage- 
ment Admission Test, the Graduate School 
Foreign Language Test, Optometry College 
Admission Test, Professional and Administra- 
tive Career Examination, State Merit Examina- 
tion, and Veterinary Aptitude Test. 

Such tests provide information to help stu- 
dents evaluate personal, educational, or voca- 
tional needs. Test results are confidential. 

Placement 

The Office of Career Development and Place- 
ment offers general assistance in the planning 
of career directions. The office operates a per- 
sonal resume service for all regularly enrolled 
students of the college, receives listings of 
full-time career opportunities, and arranges 
on-campus recruiting with business, govern- 
mental and educational agencies. Students 
who wish to make use of the Placement Ser- 
vice are advised to contact the Placement 
Director three quarters prior to completion of 
studies. 

The Placement Office also provides a job 
listing and referral system for currently enrolled 
students who are seeking part-time tempo- 
rary, or vacation employment. 

Veterans Services 

An Office of Veterans Affairs is maintained 
to advise veterans concerning admissions 
procedures and services available to them. 



34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The office employs a number of student veter- 
ans to assist in meeting the needs of the veter- 
an student body. 

Student Organizations 

Student organizations at Armstrong State 
College reflect the natural variety of interests 
found in a diversified student body. These 
include the following: 
Religious: 

Baptist Student Union 

Newman Club 
Greeks: 

Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority 

Panhellenic Council 

Phi Mu Sorority 

Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity 

Sigma Kappa Sorority 

Sigma Nu Fraternitv 
Professional: 

Alpha Sigma Chi (Physical Education) 

American Chemical Society 

Armstrong Students' Political 
Science Association 

Association for Computing Machinery 

Data Processing Management 
Association 

Georgia Association of Nursing Students 

Jr. American Dental Hygienists 
Association 

Medical Record Association 

Music Education National Conference 

Students Caring About People (Social 
Work) 

The E.B. Twitmeyer Society (Psychology) 
Interest: 

Armstrong Ebony Association 

Band 

Cheerleaders 

Chess Club 

Chorus 

Dungeoneers 

Masquers 
Honorary: 

Epsilon Delta Pi (Computer Science) 

Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

Phi Alpha Theta (History) 

Phi Eta Sigma (Scholastic for freshmen) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 

Student Government 

The Student Government Association is the 
official governing body of the students at Arm- 
strong State College. It assists in formulating a 
program of student services and activities, and 



it strives to express the will of the majority of 
students and to provide experience in demo- 
cratic living. 

All students are automatically members of 
the Student Government Association and are 
entitled to vote in SGA elections. Qualified stu- 
dents may seek positions of leadership in the 
Student Government Association by running 
for office during the Spring or Fall elections. 

Student Publications 

The official student publications on campus 
are the Inkwell (the College newspaper) and 
the Geechee (the College yearbook). Both 
publications are produced by students under 
the supervision of approved college advisors. 
Financed in part by the Student Activity Fund, 
each provides opportunities for students in 
creative writing, reporting, photography, and 
design. 



Housing 



There is no student housing on campus. 
Private apartments for students are located 
within walking distance of the College. For 
further information regarding housing, please 
contact the Office of Counseling and Place- 
ment. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Armstrong State College is affiliated with the 
National Association of Intercollegiate Athlet- 
ics, the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 
for Women, and the Georgia Association of 
Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. The col- 
lege teams participate in intercollegiate com- 
petition in baseball, basketball, softball, tennis, 
and soccer. 

Intramurals 

The Student Intramural Council and Physi- 
cal Education Department provide a diversi- 
fied program available to all students and 
faculty, including organized competitive sports, 
recreational activities, and clubs. Any student, 
faculty, or staff person interested in participat- 
ing in these activities should contact the Direc- 
tor of Intramurals. 

Cultural Opportunities 

Nationally known speakers, contemporary 
concerts, dances, popular films, exhibits and 
performances by outstanding classical and 



STUDENT SERVICES 



35 



modern artists from around the world com- 
plement the student's general education These 
programs are selected and coordinated by the 
College Union Board Student dramatic, choral, 
and instrumental groups under professional 
direction have established distinguished tradi- 
tions 

Computer Services 

The Office of Computer Services coordi- 
nates a campus-wide system of computer 
services. 

The Director also provides technical assis- 
tance to the faculty and staff of the College in 
the development of computer programs and 
systems. Through participation in the Univer- 
sity System Computer Network, information 
processing devices located on campus are 
connected via a direct telephone line to the 
large computers located at Georgia State Uni- 
versity and the University of Georgia. 

Computer use time is free for Armstrong 
students, faculty and staff. The Cyber 740 and 
IBM 370 can be accessed using many differ- 
ent programming languages. Contact Comput- 
er Services for a user number. Students in 
Computer Science courses receive a number 
automatically. Help is provided in computer 
control language, statistical packages and 
other areas of interest. 



Writing Center 



The Writing Center, located in Gamble 1 09, 
is a place where students in all disciplines may 
come for help with their writing. Tutors in the 
Writing Center offer individual instruction in 
basic writing skills and provide guidance in the 
preparation of essays, reports, and research 
papers. The aim of the Writing Center is not 
only to assist students in core composition 
courses, but also to work with faculty to 
improve writing across the curriculum. The 
center is administered by the Department of 
Languages, Literature and Dramatic Arts. 



Library Services 



Lane Library, built in 1966 and extensively 
enlarged in 1975, serves the library needs of 
the Armstrong State College community. The 
staff attempts to combine the traditional repos- 
itory responsibility of academic libraries with 
newer concepts of librarianship that include 
bibliographic instruction, computer-assisted 
information retrieval, and audio-visual produc- 
tion/circulation. 



The library collection consists of approxi- 
mately 500,000 total resources, including 
1 30,000 books and periodicals, 300,000 micro- 
forms, 1 3,000 records, slides, motion pictures, 
and videotapes, and 850 newspaper and peri- 
odical subscriptions A Florence Powell Minis 
Collection includes college archives, material 
of local color, and a special collection of first 
editions and Conrad Aiken works An interli- 
brary loan system augments the collections 

Lane Library has taken advantage of the 
latest technology to improve its services and 
operations. Library technical services are ac- 
complished primarily through membership in a 
national bibliographic utility; reference servi- 
ces are strengthened via computerized biblio- 
graphic searching; and audio-visual services 
are rendered through sophisticated graphic/ 
television/software distribution divisions. 



Development Activities 

The purpose of the Office of Development is 
to promote funding for college programs from 
sources supplemental to state appropriations 
and student fees. To accomplish this purpose, 
the College participates in federal and other 
grant supported activities, and seeks assis- 
tance from alumni and friends. From private 
sources, the College accepts memorial and 
other gifts for the athletic program, instruc- 
tional equipment, library books, matching funds 
for grants, scholarships, and other restricted 
purposes. Unrestricted contributions are ac- 
cepted to be used at the discretion of the Pres- 
ident to meet special and unforeseen needs. 
Gifts of any size can be used to add to the 
library collection in the name of an individual or 
an agency; all gifts are acknowledged and 
published, where appropriate and when re- 
quested. Gifts for scholarships are generally 
received by the College in one of two ways: the 
donor specifies support or choice of specific 
students, with the College serving only as a 
distribution agent; or the donor specifies sup- 
port of student scholarships generally or schol- 
arships within a broad academic field, with the 
College identifying the gift by name, if appro- 
priate, and distributing the funds according to 
standard policies and procedures. Gifts of this 
latter type are tax deductible. The Dean for 
Student Affairs and Development is pleased to 
provide further information to any prospective 
donor. 



36 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Alumni Office Activities 

The primary purposes of the Alumni Office 
are to keep former students informed about 
the College and to help them keep in touch 
with each other. Any person who at any time 
was matriculated as a regular student is eligi- 
ble for membership in the Alumni Association 
and. upon payment of his dues, will receive 
association periodicals, and may vote and 
hold office in the Association. The Alumni 
Office assists in arranging class reunions, 
board meetings, and other functions. For further 
information contact the Alumni Secretary. 



DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 

University System Core 
Curriculum 

Each unit in the University System of Geor- 
gia requires as a Core Curriculum for all bac- 
calaureate degree programs the following min- 
imum number of quarter hours in the major 
areas of study. 

Areas of Study Hours 

Area I 

Humanities, including, but not limited to, 
grammar & composition & literature ... 20 

Area II 

Mathematics & the natural sciences, in- 
cluding, but not limited to. mathematics 
and a 1 0-hour sequence of laboratory 
courses in the biological or physical 
sciences 20 

Area II! 

Social Sciences, including, but not limited 
to. history & American government .... 20 

Area IV 

Courses appropriate to the major field of 

the individual student 30 

TOTAL 90 

In addition to the University System Core Cur- 
riculum requirements as outlined above, Arm- 
strong State College requires six quarter hours 
in physical education as part of all baccalau- 
reate degree programs. 



Armstrong State College 
Core Curriculum 

The student in any baccalaureate degree 
program at Armstrong State College must 
complete the following specific Core Curricu- 
lum requirements. Consult the relevant depart- 
mental section for a complete statement of 
degree requirements for a specific program. 
Certain courses in the Core Curriculum may 
be exempted with credit awarded. 

Hours 

Area I 

Humanities 20 

ENG 101, 102,201 15 

One of the following courses: 

ART 200. 271 , 272, 273, MUS 200, 

PHI 200.201. ENG 222 5 

Area II 

Mathematics & the Natural Sciences 20 

One of the following course sequences: 
MAT 101. 103 
MAT 101. 195 
MAT 101,220 

MAT 101,290 10 

One of the following course sequences: 
BIO 101, 102 or 121, 122 
CHE 121. 122 
CHE 128. 129 
PHY 211, 212 
PHY 217, 218 

PHS 121. 122 10 

Area III 

Social Sciences 20 

HIS 114. 115 10 

POS 113 5 

One course selected from: 
PSY 101. SOC 201, ANT 201, 

ECO 201 or 202 5 

Area IV 

Courses Appropriate to the Major Field. . . 30 
Art 

ART 111. 112.201,202,213 25 

MUS 200 or 210 5 

Art Education 

ART 111, 112, 201.213 20 

EDN200 5 

PSY 101 5 

Biology 
SCI and/or MAT electives (1 00- 
200 level) or any foreign language ..10 

CHE 128, 129 10 

BOT203 5 

ZOO 204 5 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



37 



Biology Education 

BOT203 5 

CHE 128 5 

EDN200 5 

PSY 101 5 

ZOO 204 5 

One course selected from ART 

200. 271.272, 273. MUS 200. 

DRS228 5 

Business Education 

ACC211.212 10 

EDN200 5 

MAT 220 5 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 

200. 271,272, 273. MUS 200, 
DRS228 5 

Chemistry* 

CHE 128, 129,281 15 

MAT 206 5 

PHY213or219 5 

One course selected from: 
Computer Science, Mathematics, or 
Natural Science 5 

Chemistry Education 

BIO 101, 102 10 

CHE 281 5 

EDN 200 5 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 

200,271,272,273, MUS 200, 

DRS228 5 

Computer Science 

CS 110 or 146, 231,240 15 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

MAT 206, 207 10 

Criminal Justice 

CJ 100, 103, 210, 270 20 

Two courses selected from: ANT 

201, ECO 201, 202, DRS 228, 

PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Dental Hygiene Education 

BIO 101, 102 10 

CHE 121. 122 10 

DRS 228 5 

PSY 101, orSOC201 5 

Early Elementary Education 

EDN 200, 202 10 

DRS 228 5 

GEO 101 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

PSY 101 5 

*A foreign language sequence is recom- 
mended. 



English 
Any foreign language 101, 1 02, 

103.201 .... 20 

Two courses selected (mm ART 

200,271,272,273. MUS 200. 

PHI 200, 201. ENG 222 10 

English Education 
Any foreign language 

sequence 15 

DRS 228 5 

EDN 200 5 

PSY 101 5 

General Science Education 

CHE 128, 129 10 

EDN 200 5 

PHY 211 5 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 

200.271,272,273, MUS 200. 

DRS 228 5 

General Studies 
Two courses selected from: ART 
200,271,272,273, ENG 
222, MUS 100,200, PHI 200. 
201 , any two foreign language 

courses through 200 level 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

One or two courses selected from: 
ANT 201, CS 110, 115, or 146, 
ECO 201, 202, PSY 101, SOC 

201 5-10 

One or two courses selected from: 
AST 201, BIO 101, 102, 122, 123, 
BOT 203, CHE 1 21 , 1 22. 1 28. 1 29, 
201,208, 281, GEL 201, MET 201, 
PHY 211, 212, 213, 217, 218, 219, 
PHS 121, 122, ZOO 204, 208, 
209 5-10 

Health Science 

HS 100 5 

HIS 1 50 & HIS 251 or 252 10 

PSY 101 5 

ZOO 208, 209 10 

History 
Any foreign language 102, 

103 10 

HIS 251, 252 10 

Two courses selected from: ANT 

201, ECO 201, GEO 111, MAT 

220, PSY 101, SOC 201 10 

Industrial Arts Education 

DRS 228 5 

EDN 200 5 

JAE 201, 202, 203 15 

PSY 101 5 



38 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Mathematical Sciences 

CS 110 or 146, 260 10 

MAT 206, 207 10 

MAT 208 or CS 240 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

Mathematics Education 

EDN200 5 

MAT 206, 207, 208 15 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 

200,271,272,273, MUS 200, 

DRS228 5 

Medical Technology 

CHE 128, 129,281 15 

PHY 211, 212, 213 15 

Middle School Education 

DRS228 5 

EDN200 5 

GEO 111 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 

200,271,272,273, MUS 200, 

PHI 201. ENG222 5 

Music* 

MUS (Theory) 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, 1 1 3, 21 1 , 

212,213 18 

MUS (Applied) 1 40, 240 12 

Music Education 

EDN200 5 

MUS 111, 112, 113, 140,230, 

232,281 20 

PSY 101 5 

Nursing 

BIO 210 5 

BSN230 5 

SOC201 5 

ZOO 208, 209, 215 15 

Physical Education 

DRS228 5 

EDN200 5 

PE 117,211,216,217,219,228, 

229 15 

PSY 101 5 

Physics Education 

BIO 101, 102 10 

EDN200 5 

PHY213or219 5 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 

200, 271,272,273, MUS 200, 

DRS228 5 

*A foreign language sequence is recom- 
mended. 



Political Science 
Any foreign language sequence 
101, 102, 103, orCS 110,225, 

and 136 or 146 or 231 15 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

CJ 100, ECO 201, GEO 111, HIS 

251 or 252, PSY 101, SOC 

201 10 

Psychology* 

ANT 201 5 

BIO 101, 102 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

MAT 220 5 

PSY 101 5 

Social Science Education - Behavioral 

Science 

EDN200 5 

PSY 101 5 

Any foreign language or computer 

science sequence 15 

One course selected from: ART 
200, 271,272, 273, MUS 

200, DRS228 5 

Social Science Education - History 

EDN200 5 

PSY 101 5 

A related foreign language 

sequence 15 

One course selected from: ART 
200,271,272,273, MUS 200, 

DRS228 5 

Social Work (major is under de-activization) 

HIS 252 5 

SOC 201 5 

SW250 5 

Any foreign language sequence 
101, 102, 103 or PHI 201 , ANT 

201 , and one five hour social 
science elective (1 00-200 

level) 15 

Speech Correction 

PSY 101,202 10 

EDN200, EXC220 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

One course from: ART 200, 271 , 

272, 273, MUS 200, DRS 228 5 

Trade and Industrial Education 

DRS 228 5 

EDN 200 5 

PSY 101 5 

TIE 100, 200, 210 15 

Area V 

Physical Education Requirements 
PE103or 108, 117 3 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



39 



Three courses selected from 
100. 101. 102. 104. 105. 106, 
107. 109.200.201.203.204. 

205. 206. 207. 208. 209 

Total Core Curriculum Hours 



PE 



^3 
96 



Students should complete all core curriculum 
requirements during their freshmen/sopho- 
more years 

Regents' Testing Program 

The University System of Georgia requires 
that all students successfully complete tests of 
writing skills and reading comprehension as a 
requirement for graduation An individual hold- 
ing a baccalaureate or higher degree from a 
regionally accredited institution of higher edu- 
cation will not be required to complete the 
Regents' Test for a second degree An individ- 
ual who successfully completed the Regents' 
Test as part of an associate degree program 
will not be required to repeat the Test as part of 
a subsequent baccalaureate degree program. 

Students may take the Test upon comple- 
tion of the required composition sequence in 
their degree programs (usually ENG 1 01 , 1 02 
for associate degrees; ENG 101.1 02. 201 for 
baccalaureate degrees) Students must take 
the Test in the quarter after their completion of 
45 hours. They will be notified to do so on their 
grade reports for the quarter in which the 45th 
hour has been completed. Students who neg- 
lect to take the Test when first notified to do so 
will be prohibited from pre-registering at the 
College for a subsequent quarter. They may, 
however, register at the regularly scheduled 
registration. 

Students who neglect to take the Test by the 
quarter following their 60th credit hour earned 
will be prohibited from registering at Armstrong 
State College for subsequent quarters 

Transfer Students will be subject to the 
above requirements. Transfer students who 
have earned 60 or more quarter hours must 
take the Regents' Test during their first quarter 
of attendance. 

Students who do not pass the Test will be 
notified of eligibility for review and of require- 
ments for remedial courses. Students who do 
not pass the writing skills portion of the Test 
may request a formal review upon meeting 
conditions of eligibility stated in Regents' Test- 
ing Program Policy. 

Students who have not passed the Test 
upon their completion of 75 quarter hours of 



credit will be required to enroll in the remedial 
course or courses of reading and/or writing in 
each quarter of attendance until such time as 
they pass the Test 

Regents' Testing Policy 

— as amended, November 9-10, 1982 — 

An examination to assess the competency 
level in reading and writing of all students 
enrolled in undergraduate degree programs in 
University System institutions shall be admin- 
istered The following statement shall be the 
policy of the Board of Regents of the University 
System of Georgia on this examination 

Each institution of the University System of 
Georgia shall assure the other institutions, and 
the System as a whole, that students obtaining 
a degree from that institution possess literacy 
competence, that is. certain minimum skills of 
reading and writing. 

The Regents' Testing Program has been 
developed to help in the attainment of this goal. 
The objectives of the Testing Program are: (1 ) 
to provide Systemwide information on the sta- 
tus of student competence in the areas of 
reading and writing; and (2) to provide a uni- 
form means of identifying those students who 
fail to attain the minimum levels of compe- 
tence in the areas of reading and writing. 

Passing the Regents' Test is defined as hav- 
ing passed all components of the Test by scor- 
ing above the cutoff score specified for each 
component. The test may be administered 
either in its entirety or as one or more compo- 
nents depending on the needs of the students. 
If one component of the Test is passed, that 
component need not be retaken; this provision 
is retroactive to all students who have taken 
the Test in any form since the inception of the 
program. 

The intent of this policy is that passing the 
Regents' Test occur before the end of the stu- 
dent's sophomore year, that is, before the 
completion of 1 05 hours of degree credit. Stu- 
dents who fail the test must retake and pass 
the Test. Each institution shall provide an 
appropriate program of remediation and shall 
require deficient students to participate in that 
program prior to retaking the test. 

A student holding a baccalaureate or higher 
degree from a regionally accredited institution 
of higher education will not be required to 
complete the Regents' Test in order to receive 
a degree from a University System institution. 



40 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



In orderto implement effectively the goals of 
the Testing Program: 

1 . Students enrolled in undergraduate degree 
programs shall pass the Regents' Test as 
a requirement for graduation. Students, 
including transfer students and/or read- 
mitted students, may take the Test after 
they have completed the required basic 
core English courses. They may be re- 
quired to take the Test in the quarter after 
they have earned 45 hours of degree 
credit if the Test has not been passed 
previously. Institutions, however, may not 
delay initial testing beyond the student's 
having earned the 60th hour of degree 
credit. 

2. All students who have taken and have not 
passed the Regents' Test during the quar- 
ter in which they will have earned 75 hours 
of degree credit shall take the appropriate 
nondegree credit course or courses in 
remedial reading and or remedial writing 
in each quarter of attendance until they 
have passed all components of the Test. 

3. Having passed the Regents' Test shall not 
be a condition of transfer into an institu- 
tion. All transferring students from within 
the System shall be subject to all provi- 
sions of this policy. Students from institu- 
tions outsidethe System whotransfer into 
a System institution with 60 or more degree 
credit hours shall take the Test during the 
initial quarter of enrollment and in subse- 
quent quarters shall be subject to all pro- 
visions of this policy. 

4. Students whose mother tongue is other 
than English may be exempted from tak- 
ing the Regents' Test by the institution 
provided appropriate local procedures are 
employed to certify the literacy compe- 
tence of those students earning a degree. 

5. For extraordinary situations, each institu- 
tion shall develop special procedures for 
certifying the literacy competence of stu- 
dents. A written description of those pro- 
cedures shall be submitted to the Chan- 
cellor for approval. A record of the action 
shall be reported by the Chancellor to the 
Education Committee of the Board of 
Regents. Such procedures shall include 
provision for remediation if needed and 
formal examination priorto certifying com- 
petency. Such examination shall equal or 
exceed the standards of the Regents' 
Testing Program. 



6. A student may request a formal review of 
his/her failure on the essay component of 
the Regents' Test if that student's essay 
received at least one passing score among 
the three scores awarded and if the stu- 
dent has successfully completed the 
courses in English composition required 
by the local institution. This review will be 
conducted in accordance with Board ap- 
proved procedures. 

7. These revised procedures shall be fol- 
lowed by all students effective January 1 , 
1980. 

8. Remedial work as required under the 
above policy shall be in keeping with regu- 
lations in satisfaction of federal and state 
student financial assistance and such 
other eligibility programs. 

9. These regulations shall not prohibit institu- 
tions from increasing requirements affect- 
ing the Regents' Testing Program, pro- 
vided such increased requirements are 
authorized by the Chancellor, and pro- 
vided further that such requirements are 
published in the official catalog of the insti- 
tution priorto implementation. Such addi- 
tional requirements shall in no way affect 
the transfer students from one institution 
to another or the readmission of students 
to University System institutions. (Minutes, 
April, 1 972, pp. 554-55; November, 1 972, 
p. 1 66; June, 1 973, pp. 481 -85; November, 
1978, pp. 88-9). 

1 0. A student who fails both parts and who is 
required to participate in remediation shall 
be allowed to take the reading and essay 
portions of the test in separate quarters. 



Exit Examinations 

Each student who receives a degree from 
Armstrong State College at the Associate or 
Baccalaureate degree level may be required 
to take an Exit Examination in the major area 
as stipulated by the appropriate department or 
other academic unit. Each Exit Examination is 
designed to assess the mastery of concepts, 
principles, and knowledge expected of the 
student at the conclusion of major study. 
Please see the appropriate department head 
for further information concerning these exami- 
nations. 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



41 



Physical Education 
Requirements 

All students who are enrolled in baccalau- 
reate degree programs for ten or more quarter 
hours on the daytime schedule must adhere to 
Armstrong Core Curriculum Area I require- 
ments Any student who holds a valid senior 
life saving certificate and/or a valid water 
safety instructor certificate and/or passes the 
Armstrong swimming test may be exempted 
from PE 103 or PE 108. Physical education is 
not required of anyone who is beyond the age 
of 25 at the time of initial matriculation or of 
anyone enrolled primarily in evening classes. 
A student who has completed at least six 
months of military service is required to take 
only four hours of physical education, which 
may be chosen from all scheduled offerings. 

A student graduating with an Associate 
degree must complete only three credit hours 
of Physical Education. 

Students enrolled in a health program may 
substitute the PE 21 1 andPE 1 17 upon approv- 
al by the appropriate department head. 

English and Mathematics 
Placement Tests 

The College reserves the right to place stu- 
dents in appropriate English and mathematics 
courses in the core curriculum. Diagnostic 
tests are administered for this purpose. Each 
student who has not otherwise met the pre- 
requisite requirement for MAT 101 must 
achieve at least a score of 20 on the Mathe- 
matics Diagnostic Test before registering for 
MAT 1 01 . Each student who has not otherwise 
met the prerequisites for ENG 1 00, 1 01 , 1 02 or 
1 91 must take the Placement Test before reg- 
istering for these English courses or must pass 
ENG 099 in the cases of ENG 1 01 and 1 02. 

State Requirement in 
History and Government 

By state law, each student who receives a 
diploma or certificate from a school supported 
by the State of Georgia must demonstrate pro- 
ficiency in United States History and Govern- 
ment and in Georgia History and Government. 
A student at Armstrong State College may 
demonstrate such proficiency by successfully 
completing examinations for which credit will 
be awarded. 



Requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts and the 
Bachelor of Science 
Degrees 

Requirements for each major program lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a 
major in Art, English, History, Music, Political 
Science, Psychology, or to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science with a maior in Biology, 
Chemistry, Computer Science, or Mathemati- 
cal Sciences are described in the appropriate 
departmental listing. For the BA and the BS 
degrees, a minimum of 185 quarter hours, 
exclusive of the required physical education 
courses, is required for graduation. 

Each student in one of these major pro- 
grams must complete the 96-hour core cur- 
riculum requirement as listed above. 

The student will not be allowed to take 
senior division courses in the major field 
unless he has a minimum grade of "C" in all 
prerequisite courses in that field. No major 
program in a department will require morethan 
60 quarter hours at all levels in the major field; 
however, the department may recommend up 
to 70 quarter hours. 

For its major program, a department will 
require from 1 5 to 30 quarter hours of specific 
courses or approved elective courses in related 
fields and may require language courses reach- 
ing the degree of proficiency specified by the 
department. Total requirements in the major 
and related fields, may not exceed 85 quarter 
hours. 

Each BA or BS degree program, except 
those designed for Dental Hygiene, Medical 
Technology, Nursing, and teacher certifica- 
tion, will include a minimum of 15 hours of 
electives approved for credit within the Arm- 
strong State College curriculum. 

Associate Degree 
Requirements 

Each associate degree program includes as 
part of its curriculum the following: 

ENG 101, 102 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

POS 113 5 

One five hour course selected from 
Areas I, II, or III of the Baccalaureate 

Core 5 

Three PE credit hours 3 

TOTAL 28 



42 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Students in associate degree programs are 
required to complete successfully the Regents' 
Examination and may be required to take an 
Exit Examination in the appropriate area of 
concentration. 

Numbering System for 
Courses 

In the course listings to follow, there appear 
three numbers in parenthesis after each course 
title. The first number listed indicates the 
number of hours of lecture; the second number 
listed indicates the number of hours of labora- 
tory; the third number listed indicates the 
number of quarter hours of credit carried by 
the course. The letter "V" represents variable, 
hours. 

Courses numbered 0-99 carry institutional 
credit only and may not be applied to a degree 
program. Courses numbered 1 00-1 99 are gener- 
ally planned for the freshman year; courses 
numbered 200-299 for the sophomore year; 
courses numbered 300-399 for the junior year 
and courses numbered 400-499 for the senior 
year. 

Courses taken to fulfill core curriculum 
requirements may not be used to meet other 
requirements of a degree program. 

Lettering System for 
Courses 

In the course listings given in the Armstrong 
Core Curriculum requirements and in the 
departmental curricula which follow, there 
appear two or three letters preceding a three 
digit number. Following is an exhaustive list of 
all abbreviations used for course designation 
purposes. 



AC 


= American Civilization 


ACC 


= Accounting (SSC) 


ANT 


= Anthropology 


ART 


= Art 


AST 


= Astrology 


BE 


= Business Education (SSC) 


BAD 


= Business Administration (SSC) 


BIO 


= Biology 


BOT 


= Botany 


BSN 


= Baccalaureate Nursing 


CJ 


= Criminal Justice 


CL 


= Comparative Literature 


CS 


= Computer Science 


CHE 


= Chemistry 



DH 


= Dental Hygiene 


DRS 


= Drama and Speech 


ECO 


= Economics 


EDN 


= Elementary Education 


EDU 


= Secondary Education 


EEE 


= Early Elementary Education 


ENG 


= English 


ENT 


= Entomology 


ETc 


= Engineering Technology (SSC) 


EXC 


= Exceptional Children 


FLM 


= Film 


FRE 


= French 


GEL 


= Geology 


GEO 


= Geography 


GER 


= German 


HS 


= Health Science 


HIM 


= Health Information Management 


HIS 


= History 


IAE 


= Industrial Arts Education (SSC) 


JRN 


= Journalism 


LM 


= Library Media 


LS 


= Library Science 


LAT 


= Latin 


LIN 


= Linguistics 


MH 


= Mental Health 


MT 


= Medical Technology 


MAT 


= Mathematics 


MET 


= Meteorology 


METc 


= Mechanical Engineering Technology 




(SSC) 


MIL 


= Military Science 


MPS 


= Museum Preservation Studies 


MUS 


= Music 


NUR 


= Nursing (Associate) 


OAD 


= Office Administration (SSC) 


OCE 


= Oceanography 


PA 


= Public Administration 


PE 


= Physical Education 


PHI 


= Philosophy 


PHS 


= Physical Science 


PHY 


= Physics 


POS 


= Political Science 


PSY 


= Psychology 


RT 


= Respiratory Therapy 


RAD 


= Radiologic Technologies 


RED 


= Reading Skills 


RUS 


= Russian 


SW 


= Social Work 


SED 


= Special Education 


SOC 


= Sociology 


SPA 


= Spanish 


STU 


= Study Techniques 



DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES 



43 



TIE - Trade and Industrial Education (SSC) 
ZOO = Zoology 



Geoffrey, Cynthia 
Harris, Karl 
Smith. Carolyn 
Zahmser, Carolyn 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 



The degree programs of Armstrong State 
College are presented in this catalog primarily 
by school, by department. The College is 
organized into three schools, each adminis- 
tered by a dean, and two non-school affiliated 
departments. The departmental structure of 
the College, and the balance of this Catalog, 
are presented below. 

Department/ Program School 

Developmental Studies non-affiliated 

Military Science non-affiliated 

Naval Science Savannah State 

General Studies Arts and Sciences 

Biology Arts and Sciences 

Chemistry/Physics Arts and Sciences 

Fine Arts Arts and Sciences 

History and Political Science Arts and 

Sciences 
Language. Literature, Dramatic 

Arts Arts and Sciences 

Mathematics and Computer 

Science Arts and Sciences 

Elementary and Middle School 

Education Education 

Physical Education Education 

Secondary and Special 

Education Education 

Associate Degree Nursing Human 

Services 

Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Human 

Services 

Criminal Justice Human Services 

Dental Hygiene Human Services 

Health Information Management .... Human 

Services 

Health Science Human Services 

Medical Technology Human Services 

Radiologic Technologies . . . Human Services 

Respiratory Therapy Human Services 

Social Work and Sociology Human 

Services 



Developmental Studies 

Faculty 

Dandy, Evelyn, Department Head 
Cottrell, Ellen 



The Department of Developmental Studies 
provides a program of compensatory educa- 
tion for students whose academic deficiencies 
may prevent successful completion of colle- 
giate studies. Students may be placed in 
departmental courses on the basis of English 
Placement Test, Mathematics Diagnostic Test, 
or Regents Examination performances Regu- 
larly admitted students may voluntarily enroll, 
subject to prerequisites, in any departmental 
courses. Conditionally admitted students must 
enroll in accordance with the stipulations of 
their admission (see the Conditional Admis- 
sion section of this Catalog) and policies of the 
Developmental Studies program 

Those entitled to Veterans Administration 
educational benefits may be certified for no 
more than 45 hours credit hours in departmen- 
tal courses. At most, 1 5 hours may be certified 
in each of the English, mathematics, and read- 
ing areas. 



Offerings 



ENG 098— Grammar Review (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer on demand. 

This course is for the student classified as 
conditionally admitted because of failure to 
satisfy minimum requirements in English. The 
student will work toward competence in sen- 
tence construction, placement of modifiers, 
determination of subject-verb agreement, and 
other troublesome grammatical basics. 

ENG 099— Basic Composition (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

This course isforthe student with difficulties 
in constructing and manipulating sentences 
within paragraphs. The emphasis is on gram- 
mar: functions of the parts of speech, distin- 
guishing phrases from clauses, connecting 
sentences, constructing a topic sentence. 

MAT 098— Arithmetic and Elementary 
Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer on demand. 

This course integrates a review of arithmetic 
and an introduction to algebra. Topics include 
negative integers, simple polynomials and 
equations. 



44 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MAT 099— Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Prerequisite: A student must have attained 
one of the following prior to enrolling— (1 ) a 
score of at least 1 on the Mathematics Diag- 
nostic Test or (2) a grade of P in MAT 098. 
Dates of the administration of the Mathematics 
Diagnostic Test appear in the Academic 
Calendar in this Catalog. 

Topics include rational expressions, factor- 
ing of polynomials, linear and quadratic equa- 
tions, graphs of linear functions, rational expo- 
nents, and radicals. 

RED 098— Reading Skills (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer on demand. 

This course is appropriate for students exper- 
iencing difficulty in reading. Word attack skills, 
comprehension skills, and vocabulary building 
are stressed. 

RED 099— Developing Reading 
Maturity (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

This course is appropriate for students pre- 
paring for the Regents Examination, for stu- 
dents undergoing remediation due to unsuc- 
cessful performance on the reading portion of 
the Regents Examination, and for students 
experiencing moderate difficulty in reading. 
Comprehension skills, vocabulary enrichment, 
test-taking strategies, and reading fluency are 
stressed. 

STU 099— Effective Study Techniques 
(1-2-2) 

Offered on demand. 

The purpose of this course is development 
of systematic and efficient study habits for 
academic success. Special emphasis will be 
placed on time management, listening skills, 
memory techniques, reading flexibility, note- 
taking systems, textbook mastery, and test- 
taking strategies. 



Military Science 

Faculty 

Orlando, Anthony, Major, Department Head 
Jones, Karl 



The Army Department of Military Science is 
a Senior Division Reserve Officer Training 
Corps (ROTC), Instructor Group, staffed by 



active Army personnel. The department pro- 
vides a curriculum available to Armstrong 
State and Savannah State students under the 
cross-enrollment program that qualifies the 
college graduate for a commission as an of- 
ficer in the U.S. Army, United States Army Re- 
serve, or the United States Army National 
Guard. Qualifying for a commission adds an 
extra dimension to the student's employ- 
ment capability in that, upon graduation from 
the college, the student has either military or 
civilian employment options. 

The course of study offered in military 
science is designed not only to prepare both 
the student for service as a commissioned 
officer in the United States Army but also to 
provide knowledge and practical experience 
in leadership and management that will be 
useful in any facet of society. Male and female 
students are eligible for enrollment. Each stu- 
dent is provided with a working knowledge of 
the organization and functioning of the Depart- 
ment of Defense and the role of the U.S. Army 
in national security and world affairs. 

The course of study pursued bv students 
during theirfreshman and sophomore years is 
the basic military science course and/or re- 
lated skill activities. The course of study nor- 
mally pursued by students during their junior 
and senior years is the advanced military 
science course. 

For selection and retention in the advanced 
course, a student must be physically qualified, 
should have maintained above average mil- 
itary and academic standing, and must dem- 
onstrate a potential for further leadership de- 
velopment. 

Graduates of the advanced course are 
commissioned second lieutenants in the Unit- 
ed State Army Reserve in the branch of ser- 
vice most appropriate to their interests and 
academic achievements, consistent with the 
needs of the Army. Regardless of the Branch 
selected, all officers will receive valuable ex- 
perience in management, logistics and admin- 
istration. Advanced course graduates will be 
commissioned and either called to active duty 
after graduation to serve for a period of three to 
six months or three years depending on the 
prevailing military requirements and circum- 
stances. Graduates may be granted a delay in 
reporting for active duty for graduate study. A 
small number of outstanding students are 
designated distinguished military graduates 
and are offered commissions in the Regular 
Army each year. 



J 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



45 



Basic Military Science 

Basic military science courses invo 
quarters during the freshman and sophomore 
years The student learns the organization and 
roles of the US Army and acquires essential 
background knowledge of customs and tradi- 
tions, weapons, map reading, tactics and com- 
munications Equally important, these courses 
have the objective of developing the student's 
leadership, self-discipline, integrity and sense 
of responsibility 

Advanced Military Science 

The general objective of this course of 
instruction is to produce junior officers who by 
education, training, attitude and inherent quali- 
ties are suitable for continued development as 
officers in the Army. There are two avenues 
available for the student to be eligible for entry 
into the advanced program and obtain a com- 
mission as a second lieutenant: 

(a) satisfactory completion of, or placement 
credit for, the basic program at Armstrong 
State or at any other school, college or univer- 
sity offering basic ROTC and meeting the 
entrance and retention requirements estab- 
lished by the Army. 

(b) be an active duty veteran or junior ROTC 
cadet graduate eligible for placement credit. 

Placement 

Veterans entering the military science pro- 
grams will receive appropriate placement credit 
for their active military service. Students who 
have completed military science courses in 
military preparatory schools or junior colleges 
may be given appropriate credit. Students with 
at least three years of high school ROTC may 
also be granted placement credit. Placement 
credit or six quarters of basic military science, 
or the equivalent thereof, is a prerequisite to 
admission into the advanced program. 

Alternate Programs for Admittance 

Students with two years of coursework re- 
maining, but who have not completed basic 
military science, are eligible to be considered 
for selection into the advanced military science 
program. Those selected underthe provisions 
of the two-year advanced program must satis- 
factorily complete a basic summer camp of six 
weeks duration prior to entering the advanced 
program or must enroll in the condensed 
summer school phase of the basic course. 
This latter program consists of six, two-hour 
courses given during the summer quarter. A 
student may take other courses during this 
session. Upon successful completion of the 



military science COurs* 

the advances 

basic camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky, are paid at 

active army rates and given a travel allowance 

from theii home to i amp and return 

Advanced Summer Camp 

Students contracting to pursue the advanced 
courses are required to attend advanced sum- 
mer camp, normally between their junior and 
senior academic years at Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. Students attending this camp are 
paid at active army rates and given travel allow- 
ance from their home to camp and return 

Financial Assistance 

All advanced cadets are paid a subsistence 
allowance of $1 00 per month while enrolled in 
the advanced course. 

Scholarship Program 

Each year the U.S. Army awards one-, two- 
and three-year scholarships to outstanding 
young men and women participating in the 
Army ROTC program who desire careers as 
regular Army officers. The Army pays tuition, 
fees, books and laboratory expenses incurred 
by the scholarship student and, in addition, 
each student receives $1 00 per month for the 
academic year. Individuals desiring to com- 
pete for these scholarships should apply to the 
Army Military Science Department. 

Army ROTC Uniforms, Books and Supplies 

Students enrolling in the Army ROTC pro- 
gram will be issued U.S. Army uniforms, books 
and supplies by the Military Science Depart- 
ment. No fees or deposits of any kind will be 
required. Uniforms must be returned before 
commissioning or upon disenrollment from the 
ROTC program. 

MIL Courses 

The basic course of six quarters duration 
consists of two hours of classroom work per 
week. In the classroom, the student acquires 
knowledge of military organization, weapons, 
tactics, basic military skills, history and cus- 
toms. In field training exercises, potential for 
leadership is progressively developed. 

The advanced course consists of three 
hours of classroom work per week for two 
quarters in the third and fourth years. During 
the spring quarter prior to advanced camp the 
student will enroll in MIL 303 to prepare for 
attendance at Advanced Camp. This two-hour 
course is normally taken during the third year. 
HIS 357 (American Military History) is normally 
taken spring quarter of the third year but with 



46 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



permission of department can be taken during 
second or fourth year. One quarter of the 
senior year must include an elective approved 
by the Military Science Department. The course- 
work during the advanced course empha- 
sizes techniques and management and leader- 
ship and the fundamentals and dynamics of 
the military team. Field training exercises pro- 
vide the student with applied leadership ex- 
periences. 

Minor Concentration 

The department offers a minor in Military 
Science. The program is designed to prepare 
the student for a commission in the United 
States Army and is offered to, but not required 
of, those students participating in the advanced 
course of Army ROTC instruction. Whatever 
the major, a Military Science minor will strength- 
en the student's management, leadership, and 
interpersonal communication skills. The minor 
requires: 

Fourteen credit hours with grades of "C" or 
better in the following upper division military 
science courses: 301 , 302, 303, 401 , 402; HIS 
357 and five additional credit hours of course- 
work approved by the department. 



Offerings 

MIL 101— Army Organization (1-1-2) 

A study of the U.S. Army and the ROTC 
Organization. 

MIL 102— Basic Weapons and Military 
Skills (1-1-2) 

A study of characteristics of basic military 
weapons, the principles and fundamentals of 
rifle markmanship, the elements of first aid, 
and the employment of individual camouflage, 
cover, concealment and field fortifications. 

MIL 103— Basic Survival (2-0-2) 

A study and practical exercise introducing 
military techniques used to sustain human life 
when separated from logistical support. 

MIL 104— Basic Military Skills (1-1-2) 

Prerequisite: MIL 1 02, or approval of Depart- 
ment Head. 

A study of the basic military skills essential 
to the contemporary soldier with emphasis on 
individual training in first aid, intelligence infor- 
mation and field preparedness. Chemical, bio- 
logical and nuclear operations on the modern 
battlefield. 



MIL 201— Map and Aerial Photograph 
Reading (1-1-2) 

Prerequisite: MIL 102, 104, or approval of 
Department Head. 

A study of basic map reading as applied by 
the small unit leader. 

MIL 202— Basic Tactics and 
Operations (1-1-2) 

Prerequisite: MIL 1 02, 1 04, 201 , or approval 
of Department Head. 

A study of small unit tactics, operations and 
troop leading procedures to include the com- 
bined arms teams to the platoon with primary 
interest on the rifle squad. 

MIL 203— Mountaineering Techniques 
(2-0-2) 

A study and practical exercise introducing 
the fundamentals of mountain climbing and 
rapelling. Proper knot tying and safety proce- 
dures are emphasized. 

MIL 204— Military Communications (1-1-2) 

A study of military communications proce- 
dures to include terminology, security, elec- 
tronic warfare and preparation of military corre- 
spondence. 

MIL 205— The Threat (2-0-2) 

A study of the organization, tactics, and 
equipment of threat forces. Major emphasis is 
placed on the tactics used in Western Europe. 

MIL 206— Basic Self-Defense I (0-2-1) 

A Basic Self-Defense course which pro- 
vides a study of defensive philosophy, vulner- 
able areas of the body, exercises, kicks, strikes, 
throws, and arm bars. The course also includes 
basic self-defense strategy and practical exer- 
cises utilizing all of the techniques taught in the 
course. 

MIL 301— Leadership and Management I 
(3-1-3) 

Prerequisite: Basic Course or equivalent 
and permission of the Department. 

A study of the psychology of leadership, 
techniques of management, and methods of 
instruction to include practical application. 

MIL 302— Fundamentals and Dynamics of 
the Military Team I (3-1-3) 

Prerequisite: Basic Course or equivalent 
and permission of the Department. 

A study of tactics applied at the platoon and 
company level to include a study of the mod- 
ern battlefield and current military Tactical 
doctrine. 



NAVAL SCIENCE 



47 



MIL 303— Leadership Seminar (2-1-2) 

MIL 301.302 
A series of seminars, laboratories and expe- 
riences to prepare the student for Advanced 

Summer (\ 

MIL 304— Military Skills Practicum (V-V-5) 

Summer Prerequisite Military 303 and per- 
mission of Department 

The study and practical application of mil- 
itary skills and leadership ability during a six 
week encampment experience. Grading for 
this course will be done on a satisfactory, 
unsatisfactory basis Instruction and evalua- 
tion is jointly accomplished by college staff 
and selected ROTC personnel assigned to 1 st 
ROTC Region 

MIL 401— Fundamentals and Dynamics of 
the Military Team II (3-1-3) 

Prerequisite: MIL 301, 302 

A study of command and staff duties and 
responsibilities of the professional officer to 
include operations, intelligence, administration 
and logistics. 

MIL 402— Leadership and Management 
(3-1-3) 

Prerequisite: MIL 301, 302. 
A study of the military justice system and 
service orientation. 



Naval Science 

Faculty 

Slaven, John, Department Head 



The administrative offices of the Naval 
Reserve Officer's Training Corps Unit for Arm- 
strong State College is physically located on 
the Campus of Savannah State College. In an 
effort to enhance the Cross Town Enrollment 
Agreement between the two institutions, the 
Navy ROTC Unit, Savannah State College 
offers Naval Science Courses on the ASC 
Campus. 

The Naval ReserveOfficers' Training Corps 
academic program is designed to prepare 
selected students for commissioned service 
as regular or reserve officers in the Navy or 
Marine Corps. 

In support of this purpose the basic and 
primary mission of the NROTC program is as 
follows: 



To develop Midshipmen morally, mentally 
and physically and to imbue them witt 
highest ideals of duty honor and loyalty in 
order to commission college graduates as 
officers who possess a basic professional 
background, are motivated toward careers in 
the Naval Service and have a potential for 
future development in mind and character so 
as to assume the highest responsibilities of 
command, citizenship and government 

The primary objectives of the NROTC Pro- 
gram are to provide NROTC students with 
1 an understanding of the fundamental con- 
cepts and principles of naval science, 

2. a basic understanding of associated pro- 
fessional knowledge; 

3. an appreciation of the requirements for 
national security: 

4 a strong sense of personal integrity, honor, 
and individual responsibility; and 

5. an educational background which will allow 
the midshipman to undertake successfully, 
in later periods of his career, advanced/ 
continuing education in a field of applica- 
tion and interest to the Naval Science. 

Organization of the Program 

The Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps 
academic program consists of three parts: 

1 . The academic major field of study 

2. Navy/Marine Corps specified college 
courses 

3. Navy/Marine Corps minor programs (3 
options). 

Comprehensive Examination 

An NROTC standardized comprehensive 
examination will be administered to all Navy 
option Senior Midshipmen in October of each 
year. The Midshipman is expected to demon- 
strate an adequate understanding of the com- 
mon core of knowledge in Naval Science sub- 
jects such as naval engineering, weapons, 
navigation, tactics, and ship handling pro- 
cedures. 



Offerings 

Naval Science offerings are listed in the 
Savannah State College Catalog. The catalog is 
available in the Registrar's Office, the Place- 
ment Office, and the Lane Library. 



48 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



School of Arts 
and Sciences 

Adams, Joseph, Dean 



Goals and Objectives 

The School of Arts and Sciences provides, 
by virtue of its professional staff, scholarly 
resources, and physical facilities, the oppor- 
tunity for qualified students to obtain the best 
possible education attainable within the struc- 
ture of a liberal baccalaureate program or 
through curricula leading to a specialized 
degree. The goals of the school are: 

To acquaint all students, by means of a core 
curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences, 
with the diversity of the intellectual and cultural 
achievements of man; 

To assist them in developing the skills 
necessary to think and to express themselves 
clearly and creatively, 

To enable them to understand and assume 
their responsibilities as free men and women 
in a democratic society; 

To provide a liberal baccalaureate educa- 
tion, supported by sound instruction, scholarly 
resources, and a commitment to free inquiry. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Arts and Sciences includes 
the Departments of Biology, Chemistry and 
Physics, Fine Arts, History and Political Science, 
Languages, Literature and Dramatic Arts, Math- 
ematics and Computer Science, and Psychol- 
ogy. The following degree programs are offered 
by those departments: 
Associate in Arts 
Bachelor of Arts with majors in: 
Drama/Speech 
English 
History 
Music 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Bachelor of General Studies 
Bachelor of Science with majors in: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 

Mathematical Sciences (Mathematics) 
Mathematical Sciences (Applied 

Mathematics) 
Mathematical Sciences (Computer 
Science) 



Mathematical Sciences (Mathematics 
Education) 

A student may combine with a major field of 
study one of the following minor concentra- 
tions offered by departments within the School 
of Arts and Sciences: 

American Civilization 

Anthropology 

Art 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Drama/Speech 

English 

Film 

Foreign Language 

History 

Journalism 

International Studies 

Linguistics 

Mental Health 

Museum/Preservation Studies 

Music 

Organizational Psychology 

Philosophy 

Physical Science 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Russian Studies 

Zoology 



General Studies 

Associate and baccalaureate degree pro- 
grams in General Studies, emphasizing a lib- 
eral arts education, are operated under the 
direction of the Dean of the School of Arts and 
Sciences. Curriculum guidance for these pro- 
grams is provided by the General Studies 
Degree Committee (a committee of seven 
faculty members). Interested students should 
contact the office of the Dean of Arts and 
Sciences. 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts, 
a student must complete at least 30 hours of 
the required course work and 45 quarter hours 
of all coursework in this program at Armstrong 
State College. The program is designed to 
provide a substantial liberal education as a 
base for upperdivision specialization. 

Certain courses may be exempted by exami- 
nation. 



GENERAL STUDIES 



49 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 63 

Area I 20 

1 ENG 101. 102.201 15 

2 One course from: ANT 200, 271, 
272. 273. ENG 222, MUS 200. 
PHI 200.201 5 

Area II 20 

1 Approved laboratory science 

sequence 10 

2. MAT 101 and 1 03 or 1 95 or 220 

or 290 10 

Area III 20 

1 HIS 114 or 115; HIS 251 or 

252 10 

2. POS 1 1 3 and one course select- 
ed from. ANT 201; ECO 201, 

202; PSY 101; SEC 201 10 

Area V 3 

1. PE 103 or 108 1 

2. Two activity courses 2 

B Courses in the Concentration and/ 

or Electives 30 

These courses may be specified by 
a department or may be electives. 
Students planning work toward a 
baccalaureate degree should select 
courses that meet listed require- 
ments of that degree program. 

C. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 93 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS 200; PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1 . MAT 1 01 and 1 03 or 1 95 or 220 

or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201 ; ECO 
201,202; PSY 101:SOC201 .... 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 



2 Two courses B< ART 

200, 271, 272. 273; I NU 222. 

MUS 100, 200. PHI 200. . 

two courses in any 

foreign language through 

the 200 level 10-15 

3. One or two courses selected from 
ANT201;CS 110 115 1 46; ECO 
201.202, PSY 101, SOC 

201 5-10 

4. One or two courses selected rom: 
from: AST 201; BIO 101, 102, 
BIO 121, 122, BOT203. CHE 
121, 122. CHE 128, 129, CHE 
291,292; CHE 281; GEL 201, 
MET 201; PHY 21 1 , 212, 21 3, 
PHY217,218,219; PHS 121, 

122; ZOO 208, 209. 294 5-10 

Area V 6 

1 PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

NOTE: Certain preceding courses may be 
exempted by examination with credit awarded. 
Also, if a physical science sequence is used to 
satisfy Area II, then a biological science must 
be chosen in Area IV. The converse is also 
true. 

Other Requirements 96 

1 . A minimum of 35 hours at the 300 
level. 

2. A maximum of 40 hours in any one 
discipline. 

General Studies 30 

Courses at the 200 or above level 

1. Humanities 5-10 

American civilization, art, com- 
parative literature, English or 
American literature, history, 
music, philosophy. 

2. Social Sciences 5-10 

Anthropology, economics, geog- 
raphy, museum and preser- 
vation studies, political sci- 
ence, psychology, sociology. 

3. Mathematics and Natural 

Sciences 5-10 

Astronomy, biology, botany, 
chemistry, entomology, geol- 
ogy, mathematics, meteor- 
ology, oceanography, physics, 
zoology. 

4. Computer science, drama/ 
speech, film, foreign lan- 
guages, journalism, lin- 
guistics. 



50 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area of Concentration (Any college ap- 
proved minor) 20-29 

Electives 36-45 

'Credit for special experience may 
be granted, at the discretion of the 
appropriate department; such cred- 
it, however, shall not exceed one- 
fourth of the total hours for the 
degree, and credit for courses not 
specifically listed in the College 
catalog under "Advanced Place- 
ment and Credit by Examination" 
shall not exceed ten hours. 
5. Regents' and Exit Examinations. ._0 
TOTAL 191 



Biology 



Faculty 

To Be Appointed, Department Head 

Beumer, Ronald 

Brower, Moonyean 

Dixon, Diane 

Guillou, Laurent 

Pingel, Allen 

Thorne, Francis 



The major in biology consists of BIO 101, 
1 02; BOT 203; ZOO 204, and at least 40 quar- 
ter hours credit in biology courses (Botany, 
zoology, etc.) numbered 300 or above. The 
majority of the courses in the major numbered 
300 or above must be taken in the Biology 
Department at Armstrong State College. 

In addition, biology majors must complete 
elementary statistics and the course sequence 
in organic chemistry (15 quarter hours). The 
course in general college physics (1 5 quarter 
hours) is strongly recommended and should 
be considered essential for those who expect 
to continue the study of biology beyond the 
B.S. degree. 

Each student acquiring a major in biology 
must include in his program the following 
courses; BIO 370; BIO 480; BOT 41 or ZOO 
410; one course in botany numbered 300 or 
above, other than BOT 41 0; and one course in 
zoology numbered 300 or above, other than 
ZOO 410. If credit for any of the first three 
required units is transferred to Armstrong from 
another college, the department may require 
that it be validated by examination. 

To be admitted to courses in biology above 
the freshman level (those numbered 200 or 
above), the student must have completed the 



prerequisites for each with at least a grade of 
"C" for each prerequisite. To be eligible for a 
B.S. degree in biology the student must have a 
grade of at least "C" for all upper division 
courses (those numbered 300 or above) in 
biology. 

Begmning students who have successfully 
completed strong courses in biology in high 
school are advised to take examinations for 
advanced placement or for credit for BIO 1 01 , 
1 02, 121 , and/or 1 22. Arrangements to take 
these examinations may be made with the 
head of the department. 

In order to receive Core Curriculum credits 
for the biology laboratory science sequence 
by taking biology in the Savannah State- 
Armstrong exchange program, a student must 
take the ENTIRE sequence of ten quarter 
hours either at Armstrong State College or at 
Savannah State College. 

Students majoring in biology may concur- 
rently complete all pre-medical, pre-dental, 
and/or pre-veterninary requirements and all 
requirements for secondary teaching certifica- 
tion in science (biology). 

By careful use of electives a student major- 
ing in biology may concurrently acquire a 
second major in chemistry (i.e., he may take a 
"double major"). This program is recommended 
for pre-professional students. It does require 
10 to 20 quarter hours credit above the min- 
imum required for graduation. Ask the depart- 
ment head for additional information. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272,273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. BIO 101, 102 10 

2. MAT 1 01 (or 1 03 or 206 if exami- 
nation allows) and MAT 220 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201: ECO 
201,202; PSY 101, SOC 201 ... 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129; BOT 203; ZOO 
204 20 

2. Two courses from: natural sci- 
ences, Mathematics, foreign 



BIOLOGY 



51 



language 10 

Area V 6 

1 PE 103 or 108 and 11 / 3 

2 Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B Courses in the Major Field 40 

1 BIO 370. 480. BOT 410 or ZOO 
410 15 

2 Electives at the 300-400 level 
selected from biology, botany, 
entomology, and zoology Elec- 
tives must include one BOT 
course other than BOT 410 and 
one ZOO course other than ZOO 
410 25 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

CHE 341. 342. 343 15 

D Electives 35 

E Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 

SPECIAL NOTES: 

(1) Biology majors should take BIO 101 and 
102 during the freshman year and BOT 
203, ZOO 204 during the sophomore year. 
CHE 1 28 and 1 29 should be completed by 
the end of spring quarter of the sophomore 
year 

(2) The biology major should complete organic 
chemistry (CHE 341, 342, 343) no later 
than the end of the junior year as it is 
prerequisite to all physiology courses. 

(3) Students who may wish to enter graduate 
school are advised that PHY 211, 212, 
21 3, and foreign language to third quarter 
proficiency should be considered essential. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN BIOLOGY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102.201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271 , 
272.273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200. 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,220 10 

2. BIO 101. 102 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129; PHY 211; MAT 
103 20 



2 One course from ANT 201 ECO 

200. 201, SOC 201 5 

•n AMI <>()() . 
272,273. DRS228, MUS 

200 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 1 1 / 3 

2 Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B Courses in the Major Field 50 

1 BIO 370. 480; BOT 203, ZOO. 
204 20 

2. BOT 410 or ZOO 410 5 

3. Electives at the 300-400 level 
selected from botany and 
zoology 25 

C. Courses in Related Fields 25 

1. CHE 341,342,343 15 

2 PHY 212, 213 10 

D. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDN200; EDU 310, 335, 447, 
481,482.483 35 

2. PSY 301 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 216 

MINOR CONCENTRATIONS 

The following minor concentrations are 
available from the Department of Biology. For 
completion of each of the minors, the student 
must earn a grade of "C" or better in each 
course offered for the minor. 

The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 
Biology 25 

1. BIO 101, 102 10 

2. BIO electives of which at 
least 10 hours must be 

at 300-400 level 15 

Botany 25 

1. BIO 101, 102; BOT 203 15 

2. Two course from: BOT 305, 
323,425 10 

Zoology 25 

1. BIO 101, 102; ZOO 204 15 

2. Two courses selected from: ENT 
301; ZOO 325, 355, 356, 372, 
425 10 

OFFERINGS 

Biology Offerings 

BIO 101— Principles of Biology I (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: none. 
Structure and function of cells; biological 



52 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



chemistry; structure, function, and develop- 
ment of flowering plants 

BIO 102— Principles of Biology II (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Biology 
101. 

Structure, function, and development of ver- 
tebrate animals; genetics; ecology; evolution. 

BIO 121— Biological Principles, Plants, and 
People I (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: None. 

Biological principles as they relate to interre- 
lationships between plants and people. The 
course includes essential biology of plant 
cells, structure and function in flowering plants, 
genetics, and evolution. This course is intended 
primarily for non-science majors. 

BIO 122— Biological Principles, Animals, 
and People II (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: None. 

Biological principles with emphasis on 
human structure and function. The course 
includes essential biology of animal cells, 
ecology, and evolution. This course is intended 
primarily for non-science majors. 

BIO/PHY 205— Radiation Biology (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 213 or 218 or 202, and a 
two-quarter sequence in anatomy and physi- 
ology or general biology. 

Sources, propagation, and interactions of 
ionizing radiation and its biological effects. 
(Credit may not be applied toward a major in 
biology or in chemistry). 

BIO 210— Micro-Organisms and Disease 
(4-3-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: CHE 201 or 122 and 
ZOO 209. 

An introduction to the study of micro-orga- 
nisms with primary emphasis on bacteria. The 
morphology, life history, and importance to 
public health of representative bacteria, fungi, 
viruses, and protozoa are considered. Credit 
for this course may not be applied toward a 
major in biology. 

BIO 310— Man and the Environment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Completion of 75 quarter hours 
credit in college courses. 

Consideration of the interactions between 
humans and the support systems of the earth 
which are essential to their existence. Credit 
for this course may not be applied toward a 
major in biology. 

BIO 351— Bacteriology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: 10 hours of biological 
science, CHE 128-129. 



A study of the morphology, ecology, classi- 
fication, and genetics of the bacteria and 
related micro-organisms, including the viruses. 

BIO 352— Medical Microbiology (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: BIO 351 and permission of the 
instructor. 

A comprehensive study of the disease- 
causing microbes in terms of their diagnosis, 
pathology, and epidemiology. 

BIO 353— Immunology and Serology 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 128 and 129 or permis- 
sion of instructor and department head. 

A fundamental study of humoral and cellular 
immunity, the structure and biosynthesis of 
antibodies, and the interactions between anti- 
gens and antibodies. Consideration will be 
given to allergic states and other immunologi- 
cal diseases. 

BIO 354— Morphologic Hematology 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: BIO 102 and CHE 129. 
Cytology of normal and pathologic human 
blood and bone marrow with emphasis upon 






antigenic determination in blood banking. 

BIO 358— Histological Technique (0-10-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, 
embedding, sectioning, staining, and mount- 
ing plant and animal materials for study. 

BIO 370— Genetics (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102; CHE 
128, 129; BIO 351 and junior status recom- 
mended. 

An introduction to the principles of biological 
inheritance. 

BIO 380— Human Genetics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: BIO 101-102 or ZOO 208- 
209 and CHE 128-129 or CHE 201-202, or 
CHE 121-122. 

An introduction to human inheritance includ- 
ing gene transmission, gene effects upon 
metabolism, population and quantitative genet- 
ics, genetics of sex-determination, pedigree 
analysis, eugenics, and genetic screening and 
counseling. 

BIO 410— Cellular Physiology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least 
third quarter junior status; two courses in biol- 
ogy numbered 300 or above; and organic 
chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relation- 
ships between microscopic anatomy and cell 



BIOLOGY 



53 



chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabo- 
lism, and growth 

BIO 440— Cytology (2-6-5) 

Winter Prerequisite Two courses in biology 
numbered 300 or above 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and 
nuclei, growth, differentiation, and reproduction 

BIO 450— Evolution (5-0-5) 

Winter Prerequisite Major in biology (at 
least 15 qtr hrs credit in biology courses 
numbered 300 or above). 

Modern concepts in organic evolution 

BIO 480— General Ecology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: Three courses in biol- 
ogy numbered 300 or above. 

A survey of the principles of ecology and 
their application to the welfare of humans, co- 
ordinated with a study of populations and 
communities in the field. 

BIO 490— Problems in Biology (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least 
20 hours credit in biology courses numbered 
300 or above; a B average in biology courses 
and in overall work; consent of department 
iead; agreement of a staff member to super- 
vise work. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed 
py a member of the department. Supervised 
esearch including literature search, field 
and/or laboratory investigation and presenta- 
lon of an acceptable written report of results. 
Credit will depend upon the work to be done. 
3oth credit and proposed work must be ap- 
)roved in advance, in writing, by the faculty 
member to supervise the work and by the 
department head. 

lotany Offerings 

IOT 201— Principles of Horticulture 
4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: None. 

Introduction to basic gardening principles 
Lith emphasis on plant growth and develop- 
ment as responses to varying environmental 
onditions. Topics to be covered include plant 
lassification, growth and development, envi- 
onment, propagation, disease and pest con- 
ol. This course may be applied as elective 
redit towards the B.S. degree in biology. 

OT 203— Survey of the Plant Kingdom 
J-4-5) 

' Spring, Fall. Prerequisites: BIO 1 01 and 1 02. 
Morphology and phylogeny of the divisions 
f the plant kingdom, with emphasis upon the 
■ volution of the land flora. 



BOT 305— Identification of Flowering 
Plants (0-10-5) 
Spring Prerequisite ot < BOT 

203 

Studies in the identification of plants with 
emphasis on local flora 

BOT 323— Plant Anatomy (3-4-5) 

Fall Prerequisite BOT 203 

The origin and development of the organs 
and tissue systems of vascular plants, and a 
comparative study of the structure of roots, 
stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits 

BOT 410— Plant Physiology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BOT 203 and Organic 
Chemistry. 

A survey of physiologic processes occur- 
ring in plants and the conditions which affect 
these processes. 

BOT 425— Plant Morphology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: BOT 323 
Comparative studies of vascular plants with 

emphasis on form, structure, reproduction, 

and evolutionary relationships. 

Entomology Offerings 

ENT 301— Introductory Entomology 
(3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 
An introduction to the study of insects— their 
structure, identification, and biology. 

Zoology Offerings 

ZOO 204— Survey of the Animal Kingdom 
(3-4-5) 

Winter, Summer. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 
102. 

An evolutionary survey of the major animal 
phyla. 

ZOO 208— Human Anatomy and Physiology 

I (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

A basic course considering the gross anat- 
omy, histology, and physiology of the human 
organ systems. Intended primarily for majors 
in health sciences; credit for this course may 
not be applied toward a major in biology. 

ZOO 209— Human Anatomy and Physiology 

II (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisites: ZOO 
208 and CHE 201 or 122. 

A continuation of the basic course consider- 
ing the anatomy and physiology of the human. 
Credit may not be applied toward a major in 
biology. 



54 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ZOO 210— Functional Human Anatomy for 
Medical Radiographers (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 208 

Detailed skeletal anatomy; gross systemic 
anatomy and histology, with functional high- 
lights of circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excre- 
tory and reproductive systems. Intended pri- 
marily for majors in health sciences; credit for 
this course may not be applied toward a major 
in biology. 

ZOO 211— Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and 
Physiology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 209. 

The cardiopulmonary system is studied with 
special emphasis on functional anatomy. The 
physiology of the heartbeat, the control of cir- 
culation, respiration, and blood pressure, and 
partial movement across membranes will also 
be studied. Intended primarily for majors in 
health sciences; credit for this course may not 
be applied toward a major in biology. 

ZOO 215— Human Physiology and Disease 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 208 and 209 or other 
acceptable courses in human, general, or ver- 
tebrate physiology. 

An introductory consideration of disease as 
disruption of physiological homeostasis. Initial 
emphasis is placed on normal function, con- 
trol, and environment of cells as a basis for 
understanding cellular and systemic responses 
to agents of injury and organismic effects of 
those responses. Intended primarily for majors 
in health sciences. 

ZOO 325— Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Odd numbered years. Prerequisite: 
ZOO 204 

A study of the structure, body functions, 
interrelations, and natural history of the major 
invertebrate groups. 

ZOO 330— Fundamentals of Nutrition 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: BIO 101-102 or ZOO 208- 
209, and CHE 121-122 or CHE 201. 

Biological bases of animal, including human, 
nutrition; sources and biological utilization and 
functions of nutrients. 

ZOO 355— Embryology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: ZOO 204 or equivalent in 
another biological science. 

An elementary course in embryology in 
which the chick is used to illustrate the basic 
principles of developmental anatomy. 



ZOO 356— Comparative Anatomy of the 
Vertebrates (3-6-6) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 
A study of the anatomy and evolution of the 
organ systems of the vertebrates 

ZOO 357— Animal Histology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ZOO 204 
A study of the tissues and their organizatior 
into organs and organ systems in animals. 

ZOO 372— Parasitology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ZOO 204 
A comparative study of the internal anc 
external parasites of man and other animals. 

ZOO 410— General Vertebrate Physiology 
(3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: ZOO 204 and Organic 
Chemistry. 

An introduction to the general physiologic 
processes of the vertebrates. 

ZOO 425— Marine Invertebrate Zoology 
(2-6-5) 

Spring. Even numbered years. Prerequisites 
ZOO 325 or ZOO 204 with a grade of A or B. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic 
distribution of marine invertebrates as exem 
plified by collection from the southeasterr 
coastal region. 

ZOO 429— Endocrinology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: ZOO 41 ( 
and one other course in biology numbered 30( 
or above. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, thei 
control of metabolism and reproductive cycles 

ZOO 435— Comparative Physiology ( 3-4-5] 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: ZOO 20^ 
and Organic Chemistry. 

Studies in various groups of animals of tru 
functions of organ systems involved in th( 
maintenance of homeostasis under varyinc 
conditions within normal habitats and of in vitrc 
reactions of tissues and systems under labora 
tory conditions. 



Marine Science Center Offerings 

The following courses, offered at the Skida- 
way Island Marine Science Center, are coop- 
eratively sponsored by ASC, GIT, GSC, GSU 
and UGA. Five quarter hours of credit frorr 
these courses may be applied within the majo 
in biology or as electives toward the BS if 
Biology degree. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



55 



IIO 430— Estuarlne Ecology (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks ) Prerequisites CHE 
28 129, ZOO 204. two courses in biology 
lumbered 300 or above, or permission of 
nstructor MAT 104 recommended 

The evolution and development of estuar- 
bs. substrates, physical processes, communi- 
ies, ecosystem functions, ecosystem dynam- 
os and analysis The study area will include 
he estuanne complex of the Carolinian prov- 
nce as exemplified along the coast of Georgia 

!00 405— Ichthyology (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks ) Prerequisites ZOO 
'04 and one course in zoology numbered 300 
>r above, or permission of instructor 

The taxonomy, distribution, ecology, and 
»volution of fishes with special reference to 
he fishes of eastern North America 



Chemistry and Physics 

acuity 

terns. Henry, Department Head 

trewer, John 

ioette, Mary 

aynes, Leon 

ohanning, Gary 

estel, Beverly 

;obbins, Paul 

tratton, Cedric 

/hiten, Morris 



The department offers one degree program, 

\e Bachelor of Science with a major in chem- 

!try, designed to give depth in the fields of 

lemistry, yet flexible enough to accommo- 

•ate a range of career goals. Students major- 

;g in chemistry may concurrently complete all 

fe-medical and/or pre-dental requirements 

id all requirements for secondary teaching 

3rtification in science (chemistry). 

By careful use of electives a student major- 

ig in chemistry may concurrently acquire a 

?cond major in biology (i.e. the student may 

ke a "double major"). This program is recom- 

ended for pre-professional students. It does 

•quire 1 to 20 quarter hours credit above the 

mimum required for graduation. 

,The department participates in the Dual 

egree Program of Armstrong State College 

id the Georgia Institute of Technology under 

hich students may earn simultaneously the 

S. degree in chemistry from Armstrong and 

e Bachelor's degree from Georgia Tech in a 



-'d field, such as chemical engineering 
Students Interested in i«',irning more about 
chemistry degree program or any COW 
offered by the department should contact the 
department head 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN CHEMISTRY 

Hours 

A General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

ENG 101, 102,201 15 

One course selected from: ART 

200, 271. 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS200, PHI 200.201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

PHY211,212or217,218 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114, 115 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from: ANT 

201, ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; 
SOC201 5 

Area IV 30 

CHE 128, 129, 281 15 

MAT 206 5 

PHY 21 3 or 21 9* 5 

Computer Science or Mathe- 
matics or Natural Science 5 

Area V 6 

PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

CHE 341 , 342, 343, 380, 491 ... 25 
CHE 492, 493 or CHE 481, 

482,483,496 10 

Approved 300-400 level 
Chemistry courses 10 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

CS 110 or 146 5 

Additional courses in Computer 

Science, Mathematics, or 

Natural Sciences 10 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN CHEMISTRY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 1 01 

Area I 20 



56 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ENG 101, 102,201 15 

One course selected from: ART 

200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS200, PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

CHE 128, 129 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114, 115 10 

POS 113 5 

One course selected from: ANT 

201 , ECO 201 , 202; SOC 201 ... . 5 
Area IV 30 

CHE 281 5 

PHY 211, 212 or 217, 218 10 

PSY 101 5 

EDN200 5 

One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

DRS228 5 

Area V 6 

PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

CHE 341 , 342, 343, 380, 491 ... 25 
CHE 492, 493 or CHE 481, 

482,483,496 10 

CHE 461 5 

Approved 300-400 level Chem- 
istry elective 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 25 

MAT 206 5 

BIO 101. 102 10 

PHY213or219 5 

One course selected from: AST 
201; GEL 201; MET 201; OCE 
301,430; PHY 412 5 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

EDU 310, 335,447,481,482, 

483 30 

PSY 301 5 

E. Regents' Examination and Exit Examina- 
tions _0 

TOTAL 206 



MINOR CONCENTRATIONS 

The minor in Chemistry requires twenty 
credit hours with grades of "C" or better in 
upper division chemistry courses. 

The minor in Physics requires twenty-three 
credit hours from courses designated as phys- 
ics with a grade of "C" or better in each course. 

The minor in Physical Science requires ten 
credit hours of a laboratory sequence in chem- 
istry, physical science, or physics plus fifteen 



hours chosen from: AST 201 , CHE 301 , GEL 
201, OCE 301, MET 201. A grade of "C" o 
better is required in each course. 

OFFERINGS 

Chemistry Offerings 

CHE 121-122— Introduction to 
Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 1 01 . (Credi 
in these courses may not be applied to a majo 
in chemistry.) 

These courses include a study of the fun 
damental laws and theories of inorganic chem 
istry, a survey of organic chemistry, and ai 
introduction to biochemistry. 

CHE 128-129— General Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: College Algebra or concur 
rently. Offered each quarter. 
These courses are the first two of the sene 

128, 129, 281 required to complete an aca 
demic year of General Chemistry. A study c 
the fundamental principles and laws of chem 
istry with a quantitative approach to the sub 
ject. These courses are designed for thu 
science, pre-medical and engineering studen 
The laboratory work includes an understand 
ing of fundamental techniques. 

CHE 201 —Essentials of General Chemistr 
(5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to inorganic, organic, an 
biochemistry with emphasis on applications i 
human physiology and clinical chemistry. Exper 
imental principles will be illustrated with class 
room demonstrations. 

CHE 202— Physical Principles (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 201. 

This course provides a study of the physic? 
principles of gas behavior, acid-base calcula 
tions, weak acid ionization, buffer solutions, pi 
measurements, blood gas measurements, an 
other subjects of special interest to persons i 
allied health sciences. 

CHE 281— Qualitative Analysis (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 129. Fall and Spring. 
This course is the third of the series 12J 

129, 281 required to complete an academi 
year of General Chemistry. Study of ionic equ 
libria and separation methods. Homogeneou 
solutions involving dissociation, hydrolysis an 
buffer action, and heterogeneous system 
showing the influence of pH and complexatio 
on solubility are illustrated. Various chemic< 
and chromatographic techniques are used a 
a basis for qualitative analysis. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



b7 



CHE 301— The Chemistry of Life (5-0-5) 

r hours of laboratory 
science completed Offered on demand 

An introductory course covering selected 
areas of applied biochemistry This cou 
not recommended for chemistry, biology, or 
premedical students 

CHE 341-342— Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 
Prei Chemistry 129 Fall. Winter 

These courses include the study of aliphat- 
cs. aromatic hydrocarbons and their deriva- 
tives, polyfunctional compounds, and polynu- 
~lear hydrocarbons. Organic reactions are 
emphasized in terms of modern theory. 

CHE 343— Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Spring. 

A continuation of the organic chemistry 
sequence 341, 342 This course completes 
the fundamental study of organic chemistry 
with a consideration of carbohydrates, amino 
acids, and heterocyclics with their related 
:ompounds. 

CHE 350— Chemical Literature (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Offered on de- 
mand 

A study of the use of the chemical library 
iind the important journals, references, and 
nformation sources. 

:HE 380— Quantitative Instrumental 
analysis (2-9-5) 

; Prerequisite: Chemistry 281 . Winter, Summer. 
A study of the principles of gravimetric, 
[olumetric, spectrophotometric, and electro- 
jnetric methods of analysis. The laboratory will 
provide practice in techniques and application 
>f these principles. 

:HE 397— Scientific Glass-Blowing 
D-4-2) 

• Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. 
Offered on demand. 

Properties of glass for scientific apparatus; 
Production of glass working equipment; plan- 
ing of sequential joining operations; demon- 
stration of major techniques for joining and 
' orking glass; supervision of individual stu- 
\ents in preparing testpieces. 

* HE 410— Chemical Safety (3-0-3) 

i" ! Prerequisite: CHE 341 . Offered on demand, 
i) Topic subjects will include standard labora- 
M>ry safety practices, hazardous properties of 
chemicals, safety practices in the storage, 
lllse, and disposal of chemicals, and govern- 
ent regulations. 



CHE 421— Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 
(3-3-4) 

Pr< C HE 380 Offered on demand 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tend- 
ing to increase students' understanding of 
mechanisms of chemical reactions Empha- 
tic periodicity of i 

CHE 431-432— Seminar (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand 
Selected topics for group discussion 

CHE 441— Advanced Organic Chemistry 
(3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Spring 

A further study of important organic reac- 
tions emphasizing theories of reaction mech- 
anism of organic chemistry. 

CHE 448— Organic Qualitative Analysis 
(2-9-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand 
Systematic approach to the identification of 
organic compounds. 

CHE 451— History of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

Spring, odd years. Prerequisites: Junior stand- 
ing and CHE 129. 

The development of science surveyed from 
antiquity tothe present. Emphasis is placed on 
the development of ideas, men who made sig- 
nificant contributions, evolution of chemical 
theories, and the modern social implications of 
science. 

CHE 461— Biochemistry (4-0-4) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand. 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular 
constituents and cellular metabolism. Subject 
topics include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, 
enzymes, vitamins and coenzymes, anaerobic 
carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, 
the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phos- 
phorylation, and photosynthesis. 

CHE 462— Biochemistry (4-0-4) 

Prerequisite: CHE 461 . Offered on demand. 

A study of the metabolism of ammonia and 
nitrogen-containing compounds, the biosyn- 
thesis of nucleic acids and proteins, metabolic 
regulation, and selected topics. 

CHE 463— Clinical Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand. 

A study of the principles of chemistry ap- 
plied in the clinical laboratory. Topic subjects to 
include instrumentation and microtechniques. 

CHE 466— Biochemistry Laboratory 
(0-6-2) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 461 . Offered 
on demand. 



58 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



A study of techniques used in biochemistry 
research. Topic subjects include separation, 
purification and characterization procedures. 

CHE 481— Advanced Instrumental 
Analysis (1-3-2) 

Prerequisite: CHE 380. Offered on demand. 

A study of electrometric methods of analy- 
sis. Topic subjects will include potentiometric, 
coulometric, and polarographic measurements. 

CHE 482— Advanced Instrumental 
Analysis (1-3-2) 

Prerequisite: CHE 380. Offered on demand. 

A study of spectrophotometric and chroma- 
tographic methods of analysis. Topic subjects 
will include visible and ultra-violet spectros- 
copy, gas-liquid chromatography, high per- 
formance liquid chromatography, flame emis- 
sion and atomic absorption spectroscopy. 

CHE 483— Advanced Instrumental 
Analysis (1-3-2) 

Prerequisites: CHE 342 and 380. Offered on 
demand. 

A continuation of the study of spectroscopy. 
Topic subjects will include infrared spectros- 
copy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron- 
spin resonance and mass spectrometry. 

CHE 491-492-493— Physical Chemistry 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 380, PHY 21 3, MAT 206. 
Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Fundamental principles of physical chemis- 
try including the study of solids, liquids, gases, 
thermochemistry, thermodynamics and solu- 
tions. These courses will also cover a study of 
chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, elec- 
trochemistry, colloids, quantum mechanics 
and nuclear chemistry. 

CHE 496— Internship (V-V(1-12)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequi- 
sites: CHE 343, 380, 491 and permission of the 
Department Head. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project 
in industry, government or other institutional 
setting. The project will be determined, super- 
vised, and evaluated by the sponsor of the 
activity and the student's faculty adviser. Appli- 
cation and arrangement must be made through 
the department by mid-quarter preceding the 
quarter of internship. Open to transient stu- 
dents only with permission of the Dean of the 
Faculty at Armstrong and the appropriate offi- 
cial of the school from which the student 
comes. 



CHE 497-498-499— Independent Study 
(V-V-(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Head of th 
Department. Offered each quarter. 

Designed to permit qualified students t 
pursue supervised individual research or stud' 
Emphasis will be placed on the literatur 
search, laboratory experimentation, and prej 
entation of an acceptable written report. Bot 
the credit and proposed work must be approve 
in writing by the faculty member who w 
supervise the work and by the departmei 
head. Open to transient students only with th 
permission of the Dean of the Faculty at Arrr 
strong and of the college from which the sti 
dent comes. 

Physical Science Offerings 

AST 201— Introduction to Astronomy 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laborato 
science completed. Winter. 

A study of the planetary system, stars, stell. 
structure, and cosmology. 

GEL 201— Principles of Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a labor; 
tory science completed. Fall. 

An introduction of physical and historic 
geology. A study of the origin, evolution, ar 
structure of the earth's crust, and geolog 
history. 

MET 201— Principles of Meteorology 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Ten quarter hours of labor 
tory science completed. Spring. 

An introduction to the description of ti 
state of the atmosphere and to the physic 
laws that describe atmospheric phenomena 

OCE 301— Principles of Oceanography 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a labor 
tory science completed. Offered on deman 

A study of the basic principles of oceanc- 
raphy. Topic subjects to include the distrit- 
tion of water over the earth, nature and reliell 
the ocean floors, tides and currents, chemid 
properties of sea water and constituents, al 
applications of oceanographic research. 

PHS 121— Physical Environment (4-2-5) 
Prerequisite: admission requirements, i 

fered each quarter. 
An elementary study of the fundamerl 

laws and concepts of physics and astronor. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



59 



This course is designed for non-science maiors 
interested in a descriptive survey The labora- 
tory study is designed to supplement the study 
of theory 

PHS 122— Phyilcal Environment (4-2-5) 

idmission requirements Ot- 
tered each quarter 

An elementary study ot the fundamental 
laws and theories ot chemistry and geology 
This is a descriptive course which includes the 
classification of elements, basic chemical re- 
actions, and atomic structure designed for the 
non-science maior The laboratory study in- 
cludes experiences which augment class dis- 
cussion 

Physics Offerings 

PHY 201-202— Radiation Physics (3-2-4) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 1 01 . 

These courses deal with the basic concepts 
involved in production, propagation, and detec- 
tion of electromagnetic radiation. Particular 
emphasis will be given to mechanisms de- 
scribing the interaction of X-Rays with matter, 
radiation protection, photographic detection, 
dosimetry, and circuitry 

PHY/BIO 205— Radiation Biology (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 213 or 218 or 202, and 
'two quarter sequence in anatomy and physi- 
ology or general biology. 

Sources, propagation, and interactions of 
'ionizing radiation and its biological effects. 
(Credit may not be applied toward a major in 
biology or in chemistry ) 

PHY 211 -Mechanics (4-2-5) 

I Prerequisite: MAT 103. Fall. 
I The first part of the sequence PHY 211-212- 
1213 in general physics. Basic classical phys- 
ics, including mechanics, sound, and heat. 
Designed for students with aptitude in mathe- 
matics below the level of calculus. Selected 
^experiments to demonstrate applications. 

3 HY 212-Electricity, Magnetism, Basic 
ft-IgM (4-2-5) 

• Prerequisites: MAT 1 03 and PHY 21 1 . Winter. 
3 ' The second part of the sequence PHY 21 1 - 
n?12-213. Basic electricity, magnetism, and 
geometrical optics. 

>HY 213-Light Phenomena, Modern 
j, 'hysics (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 03 and PHY 21 2. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence PHY 211-21 2- 
r ^3. Continues the study of light from the 
* iewpoint of physical optics, and concludes 



with the study of atomic and nuclear physics 
Laboratory work includes two s< • >>er- 

iments of advanced scope 

PHY 217— Mechanics (5-3-6) 

quisitr MAT 206, or concurrently Fail 
The first part of the sequence PHY 21 7-218- 
219 in general physics Basic classical phys- 
ics, including mechanics, sound and heat 
Designed especially for engineering students 
and recommended for science majors Select- 
ed experiments to demonstrate applications 

PHY 218— Electricity, Magnetism, Basic 
Light (5-3-6) 

Prerequisites MAT 206 and PHY 21 7 Winter 
The second part of the sequence PHY 21 7- 

218-219 Basic electricity, magnetism, and 

geometrical optics. 

PHY 219— Light Phenomena, Modern 
Physics (5-3-6) 

Prerequisites: MAT 206 and PHY 21 8 Spring 
The last part of the sequence PHY 21 7-218- 
219. Continues the study of light from the 
viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes 
with the study of atomic and nuclear physics 
Laboratory work includes two selected exper- 
iments of advanced scope. 

PHY 370— Thermodynamics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 211 or 217, CHE 129, 
and MAT 208 Offered on demand 

An intermediate course which includes the 
fundamental principles of classical thermody- 
namics and kinetic theory with application to 
physical systems. 

PHY 380— Introductory Quantum 
Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 213 or PHY 219 and 
MAT 207. Offered on demand. 

An introduction to quantum mechanical prin- 
ciples with applications in atomic and molecu- 
lar structure. 

PHY 412— Electronic Measurements 
for Scientists (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 212 or PHY 218 
Circuit theory and digital/analog electron- 
ics dealing with measurements, control con- 
cepts and instruments that are used by exper- 
imental scientists. 

PHY 417— Mechanics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 or 211 and MAT 
207. PHY 218 or 212 and MAT 341 are 
recommended. Offered on demand. 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of parti- 
cles and of systems of particles are developed 
using Newtonian principles. 



60 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Marine Science Center Offerings 

The following course, offered at the Skida- 
way Island Marine Science Center, is coopera- 
tively sponsored by Armstrong State College. 
Georgia Institute of Technology. Georgia 
Southern College, Savannah State College, 
and the University of Georgia. 

OCE 430— Applied Oceanography (6-4-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 1 28, 1 29; BIO 1 01 . 1 02 
Offered Summer Quarter 

The aspects of physical, chemical, and bio- 
logical sciences which are marine oriented as 
applied to specific problems in the ocean and 
its environs. Collection and interpretation of 
field data stressed, utilizing vessels and equip- 
ment of the Skidaway Institute of Oceanog- 
raphy 



Fine Arts 

Faculty 

Brandon, Stephen, Department Head 

Davenport, Margaret 

Harris, Robert 

Hough, Bonny 

Nadalich, Peggy 

Schmidt, Jonathan 

Wyss, Jane 



The Department of Fine Arts offers the 
Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in art and 
music, the Bachelor of Music Education degree, 
and in cooperation with the Department of 
Secondary Education, the Bachelor of Science 
in Education degree with a major in Art Educa- 
tion. 

Placement Examinations 

Transfer and new students in music must 
take placement examinations in applied music 
and music theory. Acceptance of transfer 
credit towards graduation requirements in 
either area is contingent upon the results of the 
examinations. 

Transfer students in art will be required to 
take a placement examination in art history. 
Additionally, coursework at other institutions in 
studio art may not be counted towards gradua- 
tion until a portfolio of artwork is submitted 
demonstrating competency in those areas in 
which classes have been completed. 

Additional Requirements for Music Majors 

There are a variety of departmental policies 
and regulations which affect music majors. 



Included are requirements for recital atten- 
dance, ensemble participation, piano profi- 
ciency, recital participation, applied music 
levels, and the Rising Junior Applied Music 
Examination. A copy of A Handbook of Policies 
and Regulations for Music Majors will be given 
to each music student. 

Please see the Fees section of this catalog 
for information on applied music fees. 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) have a dis- 
tinctly useful place in the Fine Arts curriculum, 
The intent of the DIS is for an enrichment expe- 
rience that otherwise is unavailable in the 
classroom. Normally, regular curriculum course- 
work should not be completed by individua 
study. 

However, if a regular course is to be taughl 
by individual study, the following criteria musl 
be met before approval may be granted by the 
department head: 1 ) the course must not have 
been offered during the preceding three quar- 
ters nor be scheduled during the succeeding 
three quarters: 2) the student must gain the 
approval of the anticipated instructor; 3) tran- 
sient students must gain the permission of nol 
only the department head, but the dean o\ 
faculty, and of the college from which the stu- 
dent comes: and, 4) the student must demon- 
strate, in writing, that a hardship will exist I 
permission is denied, for the student to take ar 
individual study. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN ART 

Houn 

A. General Requirements 1 01 

Area I 2( 

1. ENG 101. 102.201 M 

2 One course from: ART 200. 271 , 
272. 273; ENG 222; PHI 200. 
201; MUS 200, ART 271-273 
may not be duplicated with 

major field requirements) ! 

Area II 2( 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 222 or 
290 1( 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101- 
1 02; CHE 1 21 -1 22; 1 28-1 29; PHY 
211. 21 2; 21 7-21 8; PHS 
121-122 1( 

Area III 2( 

1. HIS 114. 115;POS113 M 



FINE ARTS 



It 



2 One course from ANT 201. 
ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 

201 5 

Area IV 30 

1 ART 11 1, 112. 201, 202.213 ... 25 

2 MUS200or210 5 

Area V 6 

1 PE 103 or 108. 117 3 

2 Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B Courses in the Major Field 35 

1 ART 301. 313, 330, 340. 370 ... 25 
2. Two from ART 271. 272. 273 
(may not be duplicated with 

Area I requirements) 10 

C Special Course Requirements 20 

1 Foreign language sequence 
through 103 15 

2. PHI 400 5 

D Electives 40 

E Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN MUSIC 

Hours 

A General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2 One course from: ART 200, 271 , 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200.201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101.290 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 121, 
122; PHY 211, 212; PHS 121, 
122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114. 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 
201, PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. MUS 111, 112, 113, 211, 212, 
213 18 

2. MUS 140.240 12 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

. Courses in the Major Field 30 

1. MUS 281, 312, 340, 371, 372, 
373 21 

2. MUS 412, 440 9 



C I 

1 I re< 26 

2 One of the following concentrations 

Completed in toto 

A Keyboard Performance— 
MUS 258, 4. nlus 
music elective 1 ( j 

B Vocal Performance — MUS 

21 7, 218. and 5 hours from 414, 
415,416, 422 9 

C. Theory/Composition- MUS 
361.411. and 480 or 481 9 

D Wind Instrument Perfor- 
mance— MUS 361 and 417 

or 418 plus electives 9 

D Special Course Requirements 25 

1 ART 271, 272, 273 (may not be 

duplicated with Area I 

2. requirement) 10 

Foreign language sequence 
through 103 15 

3. RECITAL PERFORMANCES 
(determined by option) 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,290 10 

2. Laboratory Science Sequence. . 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

2. MUS 111, 112, 113, 140, 236. 
281 20 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 64-65 

1. MUS 211, 212, 213, 237, 238, 
239 15 

2. MUS 240, 340 12 

3. MUS 31 2, 330, 331 , 361 , 41 2 . . . 17 



62 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



4 MUS 371, 372. 373 9 

5. One of the following concentrations 
completed in toto: 
A Choral Emphasis— MUS 217, 

218,353,423,480 12 

B Instrumental Emphasis— MUS 
227, 352, 424, 481 and 417 

or418or419 11 

C Keyboard Emphasis— MUS 
227, 425, 426, and 352 or 

353 and 480 or 481 11 

C. Professional Sequence 30 

1 EDN 310; EDU 335,491,492, 

493 25 

2 PSY301 5 

D Special Course Requirements 

One half of senior recital 

E Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 195-196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF ART EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 1 01 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271 , 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201 ; 

ECO 201, 202; Sec 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. ART 111,112, SO*-, 213 20 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 58-63 

1 . ART 202 5 

2. ART 271, 272, 273" 10-15 

3. ART 313, 330, 340, 350, 351, 

370 30 

4 Two courses from: ART 362, 

363,364 10 

5. ART 400 3 

C. Professional Sequence 35 



1. EDN 310; EDU 335,491,492, 

493 2£ 

2 PSY 30-1 £ 

D. Electives 0-^ 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations J 

TOTAL 19^ 

"May not be duplicated in Area I 



MINOR CONCENTRATIONS 

Minor concentrations in art and in music are 
available through the Department of Fine Arts 
The requirements of each are: 

Hours 

Art 21 

1. ART 111,112 1( 

2 One course selected from: ART 

271,272,273 ! 

3. Two courses selected from: 
ART 114, 201, 202, 211, 213, 
214, 215, 330, 331, 340, 362, 

363,364,370 1( 

Music 2i 

1. MUS 111, 112, 113 c 

2. Applied Music (six hours in one 
area) 6 

3. Music Ensemble 251 or 254 6 

4. Music History and Literature £ 

5. MUS 000 (recital attendance) . . . C 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS WITH 
CONCENTRATIONS 

Hours 

Concentration in Art 2i 

1. ART 111,112 1C 

2. One course selected from: ART 
271,272,273 £ 

3. Two courses selected from: 
ART 114, 201, 202, 211, 213, 
214, 215, 330, 331, 340, 362, 
363,364, 370 1C 

Concentration in Music 2S 

1. MUS111, 112, 113 S 

2. Applied Music (six hours in one 
area) 6 

3. Music Ensemble 251, 254 6 

4. Music History and Literature 6 

5. Piano Proficiency C 

6. MUS 000 (Recital Attendance)... C 

OFFERINGS 

Art Offerings 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are oper 
to non-art majors. 



FINE ARTS 



63 



ART 111— Basic Design I (4-2-5) 

Fall 

An introduction to two-dimensional design 
and graphic communication 

ART 112— Basic Design II (4-2-5) 
Win! 

The fundamentals of three-dimensional de- 
sign introduced through sculptural projects in 
various media 

ART 114— Introduction to Photography 
(4-2-5) 

Offered on demand 

Introduction to black and white photograph- 
ic aesthetics and processes. Including study 
of the mechanical-optical functions of camer- 
as and enlargers as well as printing and pro- 
cessing of film in a controlled environment. 

ART 200— Introduction to the Visual Arts 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of artistic theories, styles, media and 
techniques and their application in master- 
works of art from all ages. Not recommended 
for art majors. 

ART 201 -Painting I (4-2-5) 

Winter Prerequisite: ART 1 1 1 or ART 21 3 or 
permission of the instructor. 

A basic course in acrylic or oil painting from 
observed and secondary sources. 

ART 202-Painting II (4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: ART 201 or permission 
of the instructor. 

A continuation of Painting I with an increas- 
ing emphasis of student selected painting 
problems. 

ART 211— Graphic Design (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: ART 1 1 1 or permission of the 
instructor. 

The fundamentals of visual communication 
including design, layout, typography and repro- 
duction as related to modern advertising tech- 
niques. 

ART 213— Drawing I (4-2-5) 

, Winter. 



j A fundamental course emphasizing repre- 
sentational drawing from still-life, landscape, 
and figural form. 

- ART 214— Intermediate Photography (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: ART 1 1 4 or permission of the 

nstructor. 

a 

A continuation of the study of the aesthetics 
^nd processes in black and white photography. 



ART 215— Color Photography (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand 

te art 1 14 of the 

instructor 

An introduction of the principles, aesthetics, 
and print processes of color photography 

ART 271— History of Arl (5-0-5) 

Fall 

A survey of the visual arts, painting, sculp- 
ture, and architecture, in Western Civilization 
from pre-history to the Late Middle Ages 

ART 272— History of Art II (5-0-5) 

Winter 

Italian Renaissance through Rococo art 

ART 273— History of Art III (5-0-5) 

Spring 

Modern Art, the late eighteenth through the 
twentieth centuries. 

ART 300/500— Art in Concept and Practice 
(3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Art majors only. 

Provides a multi-purpose approach to the 
use of art concepts in teaching creative action 
and aesthetic education. Stress is given to 
improving ability to deal with concepts and 
ideas both visually and verbally, and relating 
goals of art education to the goals of general 
education. 

ART 301— Painting III (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisites: ART 201 and ART 202, or 
permission of the instructor. 

Advanced problems in painting determined 
in consultation with the instructor. 

ART 313— Drawing II (4-2-5) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: ART 1 13 or permission of the 
instructor. 

A continuation of Drawing I with emphasis 
on figuration, composition, and color. 

ART 320— Art for the Elementary Teacher 
(4-2-5) 

Fall. 

A study, with studio experience, of materials 
and methods for teaching art at the elementary 
school level. 

ART 330— Ceramics I (4-2-5) 

Fall. 

Fundamentals of hand-built stoneware pot- 
tery including pinch, coil and slab construction, 
glaze-making, kiln loading and firing. Addi- 
tional experiences may include primitive firing 
or Raku. 



64 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ART 331— Ceramics II (4-2-5) 

Winter. 

Fundamentals of wheel-thrown pottery, plus 
a more intensive exploration of glazing and 
firing including Raku. 

ART 333— Ceramic Sculpture (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 
Prerequisite: ART 330 or ART 331 . 
An exploration of the expressive capabilities 
of clay as a unique sculptural medium. 

ART 340— Printmaking (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: ART 1 1 1 or permission of the 
instructor. 

An introduction to basic printmaking pro- 
cesses including linoleum, woodblock, and 
silkscreen. 

ART 350— Art in the Lower School (4-2-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. Art majors only. 

The analysis and evaluation of techniques 
and materials for teaching art in the elemen- 
tary school. 

ART 351— Art in the Middle and Upper 
School (4-2-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. Art majors only. 

The analysis and evaluation of techniques 
and materials for teaching art in junior and 
senior high school. 

ART 362— Enameling/Jewelry Making 
(4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Introduction of process in the production of 
a variety of enameled art works, and of pro- 
cesses in the making of jewelry, both hand- 
made and cast. 

ART 363— Batik/Textile Design (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Exploration of a variety of processes used in 
applying original designs to fabric. 

ART 364— Fibers Construction (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Development of processes used in on and 
off techniques in weaving and in contempo- 
rary fiber wall hangings. 

ART 370— Sculpture (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 1 1 2. 

The basic sculptural processes employing a 
variety of media. Emphasis on technical and 
formal aspects of three-dimensional expres- 
sion. 



ART 400— Seminar in Art Education (3-0-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. Art majors only. 

A survey of current trends in instructional 
and research techniques. 

ART 490— Directed Individual Study 
(V-V-(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement. 

APPLIED MUSIC OFFERINGS 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are open 
to non-music majors. 

MUS 130— Applied Music (one credit) 

Prerequisite: Sufficient music background, 
determined by audition or MUS 1 1 0. 

One twenty-five minute lesson per week in 
brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice, 
or woodwinds. Applicable to a music degree 
only for a secondary applied credit. May be 
repeated for credit. 

MUS 140— Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to music majors and a 
limited number of non-majors by audition only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ 
percussion, piano, strings, voice or woodwinds. 
May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 240— Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the MUS 14C 
level as determined by jury examination. Music 
majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ 
percussion, piano, strings, voice or woodwinds 
May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 340— Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the 
Rising Junior Applied Music Examination. Music 
majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ 
percussion, piano, strings, voice or woodwinds 
May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 440— Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the MUS 34( 
level as determined by jury examination. Music 
majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ 
percussion, piano, strings, voice or woodwinds 
May be repeated for credit. 

Music Offerings 

MUS 000— Recital Attendance (0-V-0) 

A requirement for music majors and minor: 
which consists of attendance at a designate) 
number of concerts/recitals each quarter. 



FINE ARTS 



65 



MUS 110— Basic Music Theory (3-0-3) 

Spring 

An introduction to music theory tor students 
needing skills for MUS 1 1 1 May not be used 
for credit toward a degree in mus 

MUS 111— Elementary Theory I (3-2-3) 

Fall Prerequisite MUS 1 1 or equivalent by 
examination 

An introduction to the basic theoretical prin- 
ciples of music including sightsinging, ear- 
tramirg and keyboard harmony. 

MUS 112— Elementary Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter 

A continuation of MUS 1 1 1 with emphasis 
on part-writing and diatonic material. 

MUS 113— Elementary Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring. 

A continuation of MUS 1 1 2 introducing sev- 
enth chords and diatonic modulation. 

MUS 114— Jazz Improvisation I (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 1 13 
or permission of instructor. 

Emphasis on basic jazz literature, chord 
symbol, melodic patterns, ear training, melodic 
concepts and analysis of improvised solos. 

MUS 200— Introduction to Music Literature 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A course designed to help the student 
understand music by means of analysis of 
style, forms, and media of musical expression. 

MUS 201— Understanding Jazz (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 

A non-technical survey of jazz performers 
•land styles with emphasis on recorded litera- 
ture. The course will examine elements of jazz 
such as improvisation, instrumentation and 
i', rhythm and trace their development from New 
S.Orleans to contemporary fusion music. 

MUS 202— Survey of Rock Music (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 
; A non-technical survey of rock music and its 
sit styles with emphasis on recorded literature. 

MUS 203— Popular Music in 20th Century 
ir America (3-0-3) 

: - Offered on demand. 

A survey of popular music from ragtime to 
- oresent. Examination of popular music and its 
elationship to American culture. 

V1US 211— Intermediate Theory I (3-2-3) 

,of: | Fall. Prerequisite: MUS 113. 
* l8 | A continuation of MUS 1 1 3 with emphasis 
)n chromatic harmony. 



MUS 212— Intermediate Theory II (3-2-3) 

Wir ' 

A continuation of MUS 21 1 

MUS 213-lntermediate Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring 

A continuation of MUS 212 with emphasis 
on twentieth century techniques 

MUS 214— Jazz Improvisation II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 1 14 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Emphasis on the analysis and performance 
of intermediate jazz literature and composition 
in contemporary styles. 

MUS 217— Diction in Singing I (2-0-2) 

Winter. Prerequisite Music majors only. 

A study of the phonetics and pronunciation 
of the International Phonetic Alphabet, French, 
and German. 

MUS 218— Diction in Singing II (2-0-2) 

Spring. Prerequisite: MUS21 7. Music majors 
only. 

A study of the phonetics and pronunciation 
of Latin, Italian, and English. 

MUS 224— Class Guitar (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Designed for the development of basic skills 
in playing the guitar for accompanying. Fo- 
cuses on chorded styles and their application 
to music such as folk songs and popular 
music. 

MUS 226— Class Piano I, II, III (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 
major status or permission of the instructor. 

A study of keyboard techniques with em- 
phasis on the skills needed to fulfill the piano 
proficiency requirement. 

MUS 227— Class Voice (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 
major status or permission of the instructor. 

A study of voice production techniques with 
practical application to standard song litera- 
ture. Not open to students whose principal 
instrument is voice. 

MUS 229— Class Recorder (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

An introduction to playing the recorder. Ba- 
sics covered include reading music notation, 
fingerings, and tone production. 

MUS 236— Brass Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 
An introduction to the principles of brass 
instrument performance and pedagogy. 



66 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 237— Woodwind Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand Music majors only. 
An introduction to the principles of wood- 
wind instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 238— Percussion Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand Music majors only. 
An introduction to the principles of percus- 
sion instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 239— String Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 
An introduction to the principles of string 
instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 251— Concert Band (0-2-1) 

Open to qualified students 

Repertoire to be selected from the standard 
literature for symphonic band. Public perfor- 
mances are a part of the course requirement. 

MUS 252— Jazz Ensemble (0-2-1) 

Open to qualified students. 

Repertoire to be selected from a variety of 
jazz styles and periods. Public performances 
are a part of the course requirement. 

MUS 253— Armstrong Singers (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all students by audi- 
tion Jazz Choir. Public performances are a 
part of the course requirement. 

MUS 254— Concert Choir (0-3-1) 

Membership open to all students. Ability to 
read music desired but not required. Reper- 
toire to be selected each quarter from the 
standard choral concert literature. There will 
be public performances each quarter. 

MUS 255— Chamber Ensemble (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Open to all qualified students in the perfor- 
mance media of brass, woodwind, string, key- 
board, voice, and percussion instruments. 

MUS 257— Opera Workshop (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Preparation and performance of work or 
excerpts of works from the operatic repertoire. 

MUS 258— Keyboard Accompanying (1-2-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 
A study of the basic principles of accompani- 
ment 

MUS 259— Oratorio Chorus (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all. 

Evening rehearsals. Literature to be selected 
from the larger choral works. Ability to read 
music not required. Public performances are 
part of the course requirement. 



MUS 281— Conducting (3-0-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MUS 113. Music majoi 
only. 

An introduction to the techniques of cor 
ducting and interpretation. 

MUS 312— Form and Analysis (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 21 
Music majors only. 

The study of the principles of form in mus 
and techniques of harmonic analysis. 

MUS 318— Music Fundamentals for the 
Elementary Teacher (2-0-2) 

Offered alternate quarters. 

A course in functional piano, music notatio 
scales, key signatures, and beginning ea 
training and sight singing. Special attention 
given to applying these elements to children 
songs. Not open to music majors. May t 
exempted by examination with credit awarde 

MUS 319— Music Methods for the 
Elementary Teacher (3-0-3) 

Offered alternate quarters. Prerequisite: MU 
318. 

An introduction to music instructional mat< 
rials for the elementary classroom teache 
Not open to music majors. 

MUS 330— Music in the Lower School 
(4-0-4) 

Winter. Music majors only. 

A course for music majors emphasizir 
analysis and evaluation of techniques ar 
materials for teaching music in the lowi 
school. 

MUS 331— Music in the Middle and Uppe 
School (4-0-4) 

Spring. Music majors only. 

A course for music majors emphasizir 
analysis and evaluation of techniques ar 
materialsforteaching music inthe middle ar 
senior high schools. 

MUS 352— Band Methods (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Musi 
majors only. 

A course dealing with the organizatio 
maintenance and development of school instn 
mental ensembles. 

MUS 353— Choral Methods (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 22 
Music majors only. 

A course dealing with the organization ar 
development of school choral organizatior 
problems of choral singing, and fundamente; 
of choral conducting. 



FINE ARTS 



67 



MUS 361— Orchestration and Arranging 
(3-0-3) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite MUS 21 3 
Music majors only 

An introduction to the techniques of arrang- 
ing and scoring for vocal and instrumental 
ensembles 

MUS 371— Mualc History I (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite One year 
of music theory or permission of the instructor 
Music majors only 

The history of music in Western Civilization 
from its origins through the Renaissance 

MUS 372-Music History II (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite: One year 
of music theory or permission of the instructor 
Music majors only 

The history of music in Western Civilization 
in the Baroque and Classic Periods. 

MUS 373— Music History III (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213 
or permission of the instructor. Music majors 
only 

The history of music in Western Civilization 
in the Romantic Period and in the 20th century. 

MUS 411— Composition (V-V-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS 
213. 312 Music majors only. 

MUS 412— Counterpoint (3-0-3) 

J Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 21 3. 
* Music majors only. 

I A study of contrapuntal practices of 18th 
century music. 

I MUS 414— Song Literature I (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 
' majors only. 

A survey of German song literature. 

. MUS 415— Song Literature II (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only. 
A survey of French song literature. 

MUS 416— Song Literature III (2-0-2) 

J Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 



majors only. 

A survey of the song literature of English, 
Italian and Russian music and others. 

MUS 417— Repertoire and Pedagogical 
Techniques of Brass Instruments (2-0-2) 

^ r Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Junior sta- 



tus or permission of the instructor. Music 
majors only. 

A survey of the literature and teaching tech- 
niques of the brass instruments. 



MUS 418— Repertoire and Pedagogical 
Techniques of Woodwind Instruments 
(2-0-2) 

Offered on demanc Junior sta- 

tus or permission of the instructor Music 
majors only 

A survey of the literature and teaching tech- 
niques of the woodwind instruments 

MUS 419— Repertoire and Pedagogical 
Techniques of Percussion Instruments 
(2-0-2) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite Junior sta- 
tus or permission of the instructor Music 
majors only. 

A survey of the literature and teaching tech- 
niques of the percussion instruments 

MUS 422— Opera Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite MUS 200 
or permission of the instructor. 

A study of operatic masterpieces from the 
origins of the form to the present. 

MUS 423— Choral Repertoire (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Junior sta- 
tus or permission of the instructor. Music 
majors only. 

A survey of the literature of choral ensemble. 

MUS 424— Band Repertoire (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Junior sta- 
tus or permission of the instructor. Music 
majors only. 

A survey of the literature of band and wind 
ensemble. 

MUS 425— Piano Pedagogy (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only. 

A study of pedagogical techniques of the 
piano and a survey of literature suited for 
teaching purposes. 

MUS 426— Piano Literature (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only. 

An historical survey of the repertoire for 
piano. 

MUS 480— Advanced Choral Conducting 
(3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS 
281 , 31 2, 361 . Music majors only. 

Advanced techniques for the choral con- 
ductor. 

MUS 481— Advanced Instrumental 
Conducting (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS 
281 , 31 2, 361 . Music majors only. 



68 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Advanced techniques for the instrumental 
conductor 

MUS 490— Directed Individual Study 
(V-V-(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement. 
Music majors only. 

History and Political Science 

Faculty 

Warlick, Roger, Department Head 

Arens, Olavi 

Babits. Lawrence 

Comaskey, Bernard 

Coyle, William 

Duncan. John 

Ealy, Steven 

Gross, Jimmie 

Lanier, Osmos 

McCarthy, John 

Newman, John 

Patterson, Robert 

Pruden, George 

Rhee, Steve 

Robertson, Mary 

Stocker, Erich 

Stone, Janet 



Majors in History 

The major in history may take either of two 
forms: History per se or History with T-4 Certi- 
fication. 

In addition to meeting minimum require- 
ments for either program, students contem- 
plating graduate work in history are strongly 
advised to continue their linguistic study beyond 
the language sequence 1 03 level. The history 
faculty will consider substitutions for the for- 
eign language requirement only when com- 
pelling reasons argue against its fulfillment 
and only when the proposed substitute offers 
an additional research skill or a study in depth 
of a foreign culture In selecting course work, a 
student may emphasize the history of one par- 
ticular area (e.g., European, United States), but 
must complete ten hours of history outside the 
chosen concentration area. 

The History with Certification program, be- 
cause it is more structured than the History per 
se program, requires early contact with the 
department to ensure appropriate academic 
advisement 

Honors in History 

Honors in History will be awarded to those 
History majors with a 3.5 GPA in all History 



courses who submit an acceptable honors 
research paper to the department. The paper 
may, but does not have to be prepared ir 
conjunction with a course that the student has 
taken. The paper should be the student's own 
work, based on research in primary sources 
and be complete with end notes, bibliography 
and other critical apparatus. It should be type- 
written and followTurabian's guide. The papei 
must be submitted during the last quarter the 
student is in attendance before graduation anc 
must be submitted by mid-term of that quarter 
The paper will be judged by a departmenta 
jury of four faculty members who will by c 
majority vote determine if honors should be 
awarded. The awarding of honors will be notec 
on the student's transcript. 

Scholarships in History 

Limited scholarship aid is available annu- 
ally. Interested students are invited to inquire 
in the department office for details. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN HISTORY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements* 96 

Area I 2C 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 « 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 ! 

Area II 2( 

1. MAT 101 and 103, 195, 220 or 
290 1i 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 
102; BIO 121, 122; CHE 121, 
122; PHY 121, 122; PHS 121, 
122 1 

Area III 2 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 1 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO201;SOC201; PSY 101 .... 

Area IV 3 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 

103 1 

2. History 251, 252 1 

3. Related course 

Area V 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 

2. Three activity courses 

B. Courses in the Major Fields ^ 

1. HIS 300 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



69 



2 History courses 300 level or 
above with a! ' hours 
outside the area of concen- 
tration 35 

The concentration areas are 
A US History-HIS 351, 352. 

353. 354, 355. 363, 365. 371. 

374.375,376,377,379,400. 

403,416,417.422.451,470. 

471,485,486,496 
B European History — HIS 333. 

336, 340. 341 , 342. 343, 344, 345 

346, 349. 350. 410, 436, 447, 

483. 484. 495 
C. Russian-Asian-African-Latin 

American History— HIS 310, 

312, 320, 321, 322, 329, 330. 

428, 431, 435, 481, 482 

C Courses in Related Fields 20 

To be chosen from such fields 
as anthropology, economics, 
literature, sociology, statistics. 
See Department for exhaustive 

list 20 

D Electives 35 

E Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
HISTORY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102. 201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101. 220 10 

2 Laboratory science sequence . . 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14. 115; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 

1 03 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201. SOC 201 5 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



B Courses in the Mai 60 

i ms 300 5 

2 US 

a his 3 ' (depei 

B One or two courses from HIS 
351, 352. 354, 355, 363. 365. 
374,375,376,379,400,403 416 
417. 422, 451, 470, 471, 485, 

486,496 5-10 

3. Russian-Asian-African-Latin 
American History 

Two courses from: HIS 310, 
312. 320. 321. 322. 329. 330. 

428.431,435,481,482 10 

4 European History 

Two or three courses from 
HIS 333. 336. 340. 341. 342, 
343, 344, 345, 346. 349, 350, 
410, 436, 447, 483, 484, 

495 10-15 

5. Supporting Work 20 

Ten hours each from two of the fol- 
lowing areas: 

A. Approved 300-400 level POS 
electives 

B. ECO 201 and approved 300+ 
elective 

C. Approved electives in be- 
havioral sciences (SOC, ANT, 
PSY) 

D. GEO 211, 212 and approved 
GEO elective 

C. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDN200;EDU310,335.445,481, 
482,483 35 

2. PSY 301 5 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 

Majors in Political Science 

The major in Political Science may take 
three distinctly differing forms: Political Sci- 
ence, per se, Political Science with Certifica- 
tion, or Public Administration. 

To complete a Political Science major re- 
quires forty quarter hours of upper division 
courses in the field with grades of "C" or better 
in each course. Further, the program must 
include at least one course from each of the 
following: American Political Institutions, Inter- 
national Relations, Political Theory, and Com- 
parative Government. The major allows the 
option of a foreign language (French or Ger- 
man preferred) through the 103 level or a 



70 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



sequence of computer science courses. Stu- 
dents who contemplate graduate work in Polit- 
ical Science are strongly advised to take the 
foreign language option and to continue their 
linguistic study beyond the 103 level 

Programs in Public Administration and Polit- 
ical Science with Certification are more struc- 
tured in order to prepare students adequately 
to meet the demands of their professions and 
appropriate licensing agencies. 

Scholarships in Political Science 

Limited scholarship aid is available annu- 
ally Interested students are invited to inquire 
in the department office for details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,220 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 1 01 , 
102; BIO 121, 122: CHE 121, 122; 
PHY 121, 122; PHS 121, 122 ... 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201 , PSY 1 01 , SOC 201 ... . 5 
Area IV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. One of the sequences: 

A Foreign language 101, 102, 

103 or 
B. CS 110, 225 and 136, 146 

or 231 15 

3. Related courses 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B Courses in the Major Field 40 

At least one course from each 
of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 
POS 300. 304, 306, 307, 317, 
318, 401, 403, 411, 412, 415. 
416.417,418 5-25 

2. International Affairs— POS 320. 
325. 326. 329, 424, 429 5-25 

3. Political Theory— POS 331, 332, 
333 5-15 



4. Comparative Government— POS 
346,348,349,445 5-20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 25 

To be chosen in fields such as 
Computer Science, Economics, 
Geography, Mathematics. See 
Department for exhaustive 
list 25 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
POLITICAL SCIENCE (with teacher 
certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200. 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence . . 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14, 115; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 
or CS 110, 225 and 136 or 146 
or 231 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 60 

At least one course from each 
of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 
POS 300, 304, 306, 307, 317, 
318, 401, 403, 411, 412, 415, 
416,417,418 5-25 

2. International Relations— POS 

320. 325, 326, 329, 424, 429. . 5-25 

3. Political Theory— POS 331-332, 
333 5-15 

4. Comparative Government— POS 
346. 348, 349, 445 5-20 

5. Supporting Work 20 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



71 



Ten hours each from two of the 

following areas: 

A HIS 251 or 252 and approved 

300+ elective 
B ECO 201 and approved 300+ 

elective 
C Approved electives in behavioral 

sciences (ANT. PSY, SOC) 
D GEO 211, 212 and approved 

GEO elective 
C Professional Sequence 40 

1 EDN 200; EDU 310, 335, 445, 
481,482,483 35 

2 PSY 301 5 

D Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE BACHELOR OF 
ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL 
SCIENCE (PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION) 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 1 01 , 
102; BIO 121, 122; CHE 121, 122; 
PHY 121, 122;PHS121, 122 ... 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 10 

2. POS113; ECO 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. CS 110, 225 and 136 or 146 

or 231 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252; ECO 202; 

SOC 201 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1 . One course from each of the 
following: 20 

A. American Political Institu- 
tions— POS 306, 307, 31 7, 
318,411,412,415,416, 

417 5 

B. International Affairs— POS 
320, 325, 326, 329, 424, 

429 5 

C. Political Theory-POS 331, 
332, 333 5 



D Comparative Government — 

POS 34b 19 445 5 

POS 300, POS/PA 304, 401, 

403,418 25 

C Courses in Related Fields 15 

1 CS 306, 331 10 

2 SOC 360 5 

D Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentrations 

The Department of History and Political 
Science offers a small number of select minor 
concentrations. 

The minor concentration in history is both 
simple and practical. It is practical because 
the notation of a history minor on the transcript 
indicates to an employer that the applicant has 
some solid liberal arts background with its 
accompanying insight into the development 
and functioning of modern society and that the 
applicant has made an extra effort to refine 
research and writing skills so essential to deal- 
ing with that society. Whatever the major one 
chooses, a minor in History will strengthen the 
student's academic record. The minor is sim- 
ple because of its requirements. 

Students who hope to work in history-related 
fields upon graduation should consider adding 
a minor in Museum or Preservation Studies. 
Through this program unique opportunities are 
provided for qualified students to gain practi- 
cal experience while making a realistic assess- 
ment of the possibilities offered by their field of 
interest. Cooperative arrangements with His- 
toric Savannah Foundation, Georgia Historical 
Society, Savannah Landmark Project, Oatland 
Island Center, and with a number of museums 
and historical sites, such as Telfair Academy, 
Ft. Pulaski, Juliette Lowe Center, and Ft. King 
George, permit placement of students in posi- 
tions relating to: 

(a) archival and manuscript curation, (b) 
historic site administration and interpretation, 
(c) museum studies, and (d) historic preserva- 
tion. 

The minor in Political Science noted on a 
student's transcript indicates to a potential 
employer that the applicant for a position has 
some solid liberal arts background with its 
accompanying insight into the development 
and functioning of modern society. It also indi- 
cates that the applicant has made extra effort 
to refine the research and writing skills essen- 



72 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



tial in dealing with that society. Whatever the 
major, a Political Science minor will strengthen 
the student's academic record. 

Additional minor concentrations are availa- 
ble in International Studies, Russian Studies, 
and Public Administration. 

The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 

History 20 

1 Twenty hours of 300+ level 
HIS courses with grades of "C" 
or better in each 20 

International Studies 25 

1. POS 329 and 325 or 326 10 

2. One course from: POS 320, 346, 
348, 349 5 

3. Two courses from: POS 429; 
HIS 321. 330, 350, 355, 435, 

436 10 

Museum Studies 25 

1. HIS 300 5 

2. MPS 410. 411, 412 and 402 or 
495 20 

Political Science 20 

Twenty hours of 300+ level 
POS courses with grades of "C" 
or better in each and with at 
least one course from each of 
the four concentration areas 
of POS 20 

Preservation Studies 25 

1. HIS 300 5 

2. MPS 41 2. 420 and 421 or 422 .. 15 

3. MPS 401 or 498 5 

Russian Studies 20 

1. RUS 201 (assumes completion 

of RUS 101-103) 5 

2. POS 349 5 

3. Two courses from: HIS 329, 330, 
435, 428, 431 , 481 ; POS 440 ... 10 

Public Administration 25 

Completion of the following 
with grades of "C" or better in 
each: POS 300; PA 304, 401, 
403,418 25 

OFFERINGS 
Economics Offerings 

ECO 201— Principles of Economics (5-0-5) 

Offered Fall, Winter, and Summer. Prerequi- 
site: At minimum, eligibility to enter MAT 1 01 . 

A survey of macro-economics, including 
basic economic concepts, national income, 
the monetary system, and the international 
income, the monetary system, and the interna- 
tional economy. 



ECO 202— Principles of Economics (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

A survey of micro-economics, including the 
composition and pricing of national output, 
government and the market economy, factor 
pricing and income distribution, and a compar- 
ison of market systems. 

ECO 363— Economic History of the 
United States (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: ECO 
201. 

The growth and development of economic 
institutions in the United States from the colo- 
nial period to the present, with emphasis on the 
period since 1860, and including develop- 
ments in agriculture, industry, labor, transpor- 
tation, and finance. (Identical with HIS 363). 

ECO 445— Comparative Economic 
Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the 
basic tenets of the major economic systems 
developed in the 1 9th and 20th centuries. The 
role of government and politics will be exam- 
ined, along with the contributions to economic 
and political thought of such men as Adam 
Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and 
Milton Freidman. 



Geography Offerings 

GEO 211— Physical Geography 
(5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Course will include such topics as earth-sun 
relationships, cartography weather, climate 
and climate classification, soils, bio-geography, 
vegetation and landforms. Emphasis will be on 
global patterns of distribution. 

GEO 212— Cultural Geography (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

Course will include such topics as the con- 
cept of culture, population, settlement, pat- 
terns, technological origins and diffusions, 
types of economics and the relationship of 
man to his environment. Emphasis will be 
given to the process of cultural change through 
time in place. 

GEO 221— Principles of Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 21 1 plus 10 hours of a lab 
science. 

An introduction of physical and historical 
geology. A study of the origin, evolution, and 
structure of the earth's crust, and geologic 
history. (Identical with GEL 201 .) 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



73 



GEO 222— Principles of Meteorology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite GEO 21 1 plus 1 hours ot a lab 
science 

An introduction to the description of the 
state of the atmosphere and to the physical 
laws that describe atmospheric phenomena 
(Identical with MET 201 ) 

GEO 310— Man and the Environment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite GEO 211 or 212 plus 75 quar- 
ter hours credit in college courses 

Considerations of the interactions between 
humans and the support systems of the earth 
which are essential to their existence. (Identi- 
cal with BIO 310.) 



History Offerings 
Broad Scope 

HIS 114— Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter 

A survey of the main currents of political, 
social, religious, and intellectual activity from 
the time of the ancient Middle-Eastern civiliza- 
tions to 1 71 5. Throughout the course the major 
civilized traditions are considered and com- 
parative methods used to facilitate interpreta- 
tions of them. 

HIS 115— Civilization II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

A survey of the main currents of political, 
social, religious, and intellectual activity from 
1715 to the present. Throughout the course 
the major civilized traditions are considered 
and comparative methods used to facilitate 
interpretations of them. A continuation of HIS 
114. 

HIS 150— A Survey of the History of Health 
Care (4-2-5) 

Selected inquiries into the theories, practi- 
ces, and conditions from which the modern 
health care professions have evolved. Some 
use will be made of local medical archives 
where appropriate. 

HIS 191— Honors Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: B's or better in High 
School History and an SAT verbal score of at 
least 550. 

This course replaces HIS 114 for selected 
students. While the subject matter will be the 
same as for HIS 114, the treatment of it will 
vary greatly. Likewise, instruction will go beyond 
the usual lecture method, allowing students to 
read widely and carry out their own research 
under the direction of the professor. 



HIS 192 — Honors Civilization II (5-0-5) 
Winter Prerequisite his 191 or a grade of 

"A" in HIS 1 14 

This course replaces HIS 1 15 for selected 
students While the subject matter will b< 
same as for HIS 115, 1 tmenl of it will 

vary greatly Likewise, instruction will go beyond 
the usual lecture method, allowing students to 
read widely and carry out their own research 
under the direction of the professor 

HIS 300— Historical Method (3-4-5) 

Summer and Winter Required of all History 
majors and of Museum and Preservation Stud- 
ies minors. 

An introduction to the nature and method of 
historical research, treating problems of inves- 
tigation, organization, and writing through dis- 
cussion and actual research experience in 
local history. 

HIS 301— Auxiliary Sciences of History 
(5-0-5) 

An introduction to the various specialized 
fields of investigation which can be utilized to 
supplement the information gathered from 
published historical sources. These auxiliary 
sciences include studies as: palaeography, 
diplomatic, heraldry, genealogy, iconography, 
demography, chronology and numismatics. 

HIS 395— Internship (V-V-(1-5)) 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 
Prerequisites: 3.0 in all history courses; 20 
hours of upper level history including HIS 300. 

Application and credit arrangements must 
be made through the department in advance, 
normally by mid-quarter preceding the quarter 
of internship. 

The student will pursue an individually de- 
signed course project involving off-campus 
study and research in a government or private 
agency. Projects are normally designed to 
require the full eleven week quarter for com- 
pletion, during which time the student will be 
under the joint supervision of the sponsoring 
agency and his faculty advisor. 

This internship, graded on an S or U basis, 
will be credited among electives, not as a part 
of the minimum 40 hours of traditional work 
required for the major. 

United States History Offerings 

HIS 251— American History to 1865 (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter Prerequisite: Eligibility 
fcrENG 101. 



74 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



A survey of the political, economic, ana 
social history of the United States to end of the 
Civil War. 

HIS 252— American History Since 1865 

(5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility 
forENG 101. 

A survey of the political, economic, and 
social history of the United States from 1 865 to 
the present. 

HIS 351— Popular Culture in the United 
States to 1900(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An examination of the major trends in the 
news media, popular literature, entertainment, 
and recreational activities to 1900. 

HIS 352— Popular Culture in the United 
States Since 1900(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An examination of the major trends in the 
news media, popular literature, entertainment, 
and recreational activities since 1900. 

HIS 354— Studies in American Diplomacy 
to WW I (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

Considers American objectives and policies 
in foreign affairs from colonial time to World 
War I. 

HIS-355— Studies in American Diplomacy 
since WW I (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

Considers American objectives and policies 
in foreign affairs from World War I to the 
present. 

HIS 357— Military History (5-0-5) 

Spring quarter. Prerequisite: Sophomore 
standing. 

A study of the history of warfare and military 
technique in their social, economic, and politi- 
cal contexts, with special emphasis on the 
American military tradition. 

HIS 363— Economic History of the United 
States (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1 983. Prerequisite: ECO 201 . 

The growth and development of economic 
institutions in the United States from the colo- 
nial period to the present, with emphasis on the 
period since 1860, and including develop- 
ments in agriculture, industry, labor, transpor- 
tation, and finance. (Identical with ECO 363.) 

HIS 365— The American Indian (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 
A study of the history and cultures of the 
aborigines of the Americas. 



HIS 371— Colonial and Revolutionary 
America (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World 
and the settlement and growth of the English 
colonies of North American triumph over 
France in the New World, the drastic change in 
British colonial policy and the rise of American 
opposition to it, the achievement of independ- 
ence and the establishment of the United 
States under the Constitution. 

HIS 374— Women in American History 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

Women in American History: An examina- 
tion of the changing political, social, and eco- 
nomic roles of the American woman from 
colonial times to the present. Emphasis will be 
given to the pre-Civil War feminist reform 
movements, woman's broader social and eco- 
nomic role after the war, her awakening aware- 
ness of the need for political power, and the 
mid-20th century revolution. 

HIS 375— Civil War and Reconstruction 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

The causes and significance of the Ameri- 
can Civil War, with minor consideration of the 
military compaign; political, economic and 
social aspects of reconstruction. 

HIS 376— Victorian America (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

Presentation of the major subjects of the late 
19th century, including the emergence of a 
national economy, its theory and policies; par- 
tisan and reform politics; the moral and Consti- 
tutional dimensions of Reconstruction; Ameri- 
can society and social thought; and territorial 
aggrandisement. 

HIS 377— Recent America (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An analysis of the institutions and forces 
which molded American life from the late 1 9th 
century (1 890) through World War II, including 
political, economic, social and intellectual is- 
sues. 

HIS 379— Contemporary America (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An examination of the society of the United 
States since World War II, with special empha- 
sis given to the major social and cultural 
trends. 

HIS 400— Seminar in American History 
(5-0-5) 

Permission of instructor required for admis- 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



75 



sion Offered on demand 

Designed to permit a group of advanced 
students to pursue intensive research on a 
special topic in the field to be defined by the 
instructor 

HIS 403— American Material Culture 
(4-2-5) 

Offered alternate years 

An introduction to the study of the non- 
literary remains of our society, past and pres- 
ent. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceram- 
ics, mortuary art, community and settlement 
patterns, dress, diet, and diseases are among 
the topics that will be discussed. (Identical with 
MPS 403 and ANT 403.) 

HIS 416— United States Constitutional 
History (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of the origins, content, and expan- 
sion of the Constitution of the United States. 
(Identical with POS 41 6.) 

HIS 417— United States Constitutional 
History (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of more recent constitutional devel- 
opment from the Reconstruction era to the 
present day. (Identical with POS 41 7.) 

HIS 422— Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: MPS 
207, or permission of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North 
America since the arrival of European man in 
the New World. Some attention will be paid to 
British and Continental Post Medieval Archae- 
ology as well as to the special areas of Indus- 
trial and Nautical Archaeology. Special stress 
will be given to archaeological method and 
theory both as perspective for the writing of 
history and as a component of Historic Preser- 
vation. (Identical with MPS 422.) 

HIS 451— Reform Movements in American 
History (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 
A study of the reform movements in America 
since the Revolution. 

HIS 470— History of Savannah (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Begins with a history of local Indians, em- 
phasis on the founding of the colony at Savan- 
nah and on the colonial, Revolutionary, ante- 
bellum and Post-Civil War periods. Political, 
economic, social, religious and artistic trends 
are discussed and placed in context of Geor- 
gia and U.S. history. 

The course will involve considerable re- 



search in prim.r ally 

HIS 471— Seminar in Georgia and Local 
History (5-0-5) 

ate years Prerec 
470 or permission of the Instructor 

An exposition of the principles and tech- 
niques of local history followed by an intensive 
investigation of selected aspects of the history 
of Savannah and Georgia using primary sour- 
ces and culminating in a research paper 

HIS 485-486— Independent Study in 
United States History (V-V-(1-5)) 

Available each quarter Prerequisites HIS 
300 and at least 15 additional hours in upper 
division History courses (with a minimum GP A 
of 3.0), an overall GPA of 2.5 (after completion of 
120 hours), and an approved application 
Open to transient students only with the per- 
mission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to 
pursue individual research and reading in the 
chosen field underthe supervision of a member 
of the History faculty. An application must be 
filed with the department, in advance, normally 
by mid-quarter preceding the independent 
study. A full description of the requirements 
and an application may be obtained in the 
departmental office. 

HIS 496— American Historiography (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of the writing of American history 
from colonial times to the present with empha- 
sis on the historical philosophies and interpre- 
tations of the major schools of thought as well 
as individual historians. Recommended espe- 
cially to students contemplating graduate work 
in History. 

European History Offerings 

HIS 333— Modern Germany, 1789-1933 
(5-0-5) 

A study of German from the pluralism of the 
Holy Roman Empire through the German con- 
federation to the unified Reich. Attention will be 
given to the political, social, and cultural devel- 
opments in Austria, Prussia, and the "Third 
Germany." 

HIS 336— Modern East Central Europe 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A survey of the history of the nations between 
Germany and Russia in the 1 9th and 20th cen- 
turies. Topics to be covered include the rise of 
nationalism, the gaining of independence, prob- 



76 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



lems in establishing democracy, experience 
during World War II, and the establishment of 
communist control 

His 340— English History, 1485-1660 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An analysis of political, constitutional, eco- 
nomic, and religious issues under the Tudors 
and early Stuarts, including the English Civil 
War 

HIS 341— English History, 1660-1815 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An investigation of the Restoration monar- 
chies, the constitutional revolution of 1 688, the 
rise of ministerial responsibility in the early 
1 8th century, the American colonial revolt, and 
England's relationshiptothe French Revolution. 

HIS 342— Ancient History (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of the early civilizations of the Middle 
East, the Greek city states, the Roman republic 
and empire, with special emphasis on the 
social, political and cultural contributions of 
these ancient peoples. 

HIS 343— Early Middle Ages, A.D. 333- 
c.1000 (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years 

The history of Europe from the fall of the 
Roman Empire through the Carolingian period 
with special emphasis on the institutional 
developments which led to the emergence of 
stable kingdoms out of the chaos of the barbar- 
ian invasions. 

HIS 344— The High Middle Ages, C.1000 
to c.1300 (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

The history of Europe from c.1 000 to c.1 300 
with emphasis on the struggle between church 
and state, the Crusade movement, and the 
12th century intellectual renaissance, all of 
which profoundly influenced the development 
of the various medieval kingdoms. 

HIS 345— The Late Middle Ages and 
Renaissance (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

The history of Europe from c.1 300 to 1 51 7 
with emphasis on the political, cultural, and 
intellectual developments which transformed 
medieval and Renaissance society. 

HIS 346— Reformation Era (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 
A study of the controversial era emphasizing 
its major issues and movements, and their 



development through the Thirty Years War. 
Political, social, and economic, as well as reli- 
gious facets of the upheaval will be considered. 

HIS 349— Absolutism and the Enlightenment 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

The primary focus of this course is the social 
and intellectual history of western Europe dur- 
ing the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 

HIS 350— Modern Europe (5-0-5) 

Europe since 1815. A study of major politi- 
cal, intellectual and social developments in 
European history since the Congress of Vienna. 

HIS 410— Seminar in European History 
(5-0-5) 

Permission of instructor required for admis- 
sion. Winter, 1982. 

A detailed analysis of a specific problem in 
European history by examination of primary 
materials. 

HIS 436— European Diplomatic History 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 
The history of European diplomatic relations 
during the 1 9th and 20th centuries. 

HIS 447— The French Revolution and 
Napoleon (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

The ideas and events of the Old Regime and 1 
the Enlightenment in France, with emphasis on 
the impact of the French Revolution and the 
career of Napoleon upon the major European 
nations. 

Readings on the French Revolution, with; 
special emphasis on conflicting interpretations, 
or research projects may be assigned. 

HIS 483-484— Independent Study in 
European History (V-V-(1-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 
300 and at least 1 5 additional hours in upper 
division History courses (with a minimum GPA 
of 3.0), an overall GPA of 2.5 (after completion of 
120 hours), and an approved application. 
Open to transient students only with the per- 
mission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to 
pursue individual research and reading in the 
chosen field under the supervision of a member 
of the History faculty. An application must be 
filed with the department, in advance, normally 
by mid-quarter preceding the independent 
study. A full description of the requirements 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



77 



and an application may be obtained in the 
departmental off 

HIS 495— European Historiography (5-0-5) 

Offered altt 

A study of the writers of history ii 
ern cultural tradition, with an emphasis on the 
historical philosophies, interpretations, and 
problems raised by the major modern Euro- 
pean historians Recommended especially to 
students contemplating graduate work in His- 
tory 

Russian, Asian, African and Latin American 
History Offerings 

HIS 310— Latin America (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years 

An introductory course in Latin-American 
history with consideration given to institutions 
of the areas as well as events and personalities. 

HIS 312— History of Africa (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years 

A survey of African civilizations from ancient 
times, with major emphasis on development of 
the continent since 1800 

HIS 320— Traditional China (5-0-5) 

The history of Chinese civilization from 
ancient times to the early nineteenth century, 
with emphasis on its characteristic political, 
social, economic, and cultural developments. 

HIS 321— Modern China (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

The history of China from the nineteenth 
century to the present, with emphasison politi- 
cal, social, economic, and intellectual develop- 
ments. 

HIS 322— History of Japan (5-0-5) 

A survey of the history of Japan from the 
earliest times to the present, with primary 
emphasis on its emergence as a world power 
since the late nineteenth century. 

HIS 329— Medieval Russia (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A survey of the economic, social, and politi- 
cal development of the Russian state from its 
foundation in the 9th century through its modern- 
ization in the 9th century through its moderni- 
zation by Peter the Great in the early 18th 
century. 

HIS 330— Modern Russia (5-0-5) 

Offered every year. 

A survey of Russian history from Peter the 
Great to the present. The major political, cultur- 
al, economic, and social developments of 



Russia if rial and l i ods 

HIS 428— Russia and the West (5-0-5) 

A detailed study of the impact of W< 
influence on the Muscovite slate in the six- 
and seventeenth centuries 

HIS 431— The Russian Revolution (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years Prerequisite 
mission of the instructor 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary 
tradition, the causes for the collapse of Tsar- 
ism, the Bolshevik Revolution, and victory in 
the Russian Civil War 

HIS 435— History of Soviet Foreign Policy 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

This course reviews historically the devel- 
opment of Soviet foreign policy toward West- 
ern European states, notably Germany, and 
also with the non-European world through 
1 91 7-1 940, World War II, and Cold War phases. 
Special attention will be given in this last phase 
to U.S. -Soviet rivalry. Soviet relations with 
other communist states in Eastern Europe, 
China, and the Third World, and to the recent 
moves toward detente. 

HIS 481-482— Independent Study in 
Russian/Asian/African/Latin-American 
History (V-V-(1-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 
300 and at least 15 additional hours in upper 
division History courses (with a minimum GPA 
of 3.0), an overall GPA of 2.5 (after completion 
of 120 hours), and an approved application. 
Open to transient students only with the per- 
mission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to 
pursue individual research and reading in the 
chosen field under the supervision of a member 
of the History faculty. An application must be 
filed with the department, in advance, normally 
by mid-quarter preceding the independent 
study. A full description of the requirements 
and an application may be obtained in the 
departmental office. 

Museum and Preservation Studies Offerings 

MPS 201— Introduction to Museum and 
Preservation Studies (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

MPS 201 is designed to introduce the inter- 
ested student to the wide variety of techniques 



78 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



and approaches used in the museum and 
preservation field. The course will cover cura- 
torship, administration, grantsmanship, exhib- 
its, living history, and archaeology as well as 
presenting information about architecture and 
adaptive reuse of historic structures. The stu- 
dent will also be familiarized with archive stor- 
age and use as well as the curation of some 
materials 

MPS 207— Introduction to Archeology 
(5-0-5) 

The introductory archaeology course con- 
sists of a history of the field, basic techniques, 
theoretical underpinnings, and examples of 
field work from all types of excavation. It cov- 
ers the range from early man to industrial and 
urban archeology in a general fashion. Analy- 
sis is introduced along with survey techniques, 
preservation, reporting and other skills. (Iden- 
tical with ANT 207.) 

MPS 401— Fieldwork in Historical 
Archaeology (0-10-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: MPS 207 or permis- 
sion of instructor or director. 

An introduction to and first application of 
archaeological methods to a specific field proj- 
ect. Excavation techniques, surveying and 
map making, data collecting and recording, 
archaeological photography, the identification 
and analysis of artifacts, and the interpretation 
or archaeological data will be presented in 
field and laboratory work as well as in lectures 
and readings. (Identical with ANT 401 .) (Under 
certain circumstances this course may be 
substituted in the Preservation Studies minor 
for MPS 498). Course may be repeated for 
credit. 

MPS 402— Practicum in Archaeological 
Analysis (2-6-5) 

Fall Prerequisite: permission of instructor or 
director. 

The application of archaeological interpret- 
ative techniques to a specific site or analytical 
problem. Individual research projects in the 
interpretation of archaeological data and the 
conservation of artifactual finds with special 
attention to the care and storage of collec- 
tions, display in the museum setting, and the 
presentation of archaeologically-derived infor- 
mation. (Identical with ANT 402). (Under cer- 
tain circumstances this course may be substi- 
tuted in the Museum Studies minor for MPS 
495). 



MPS 403— American Material Culture 
(4-2-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An introduction to the study of the non- 
literary remains of our society, past and pres- 
ent. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceram- 
ics, mortuary art, community and settlement 
patterns, dress, diet, and disease are among 
the topics that will be discussed. (Identical to 
HIS 403 and ANT 403.) 

MPS 410— Curatorship (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: HIS 
300. 

Deals with the historical background and 
purpose of curatorship, conservation, restora- 
tion technology, research including authenti- 
cation, cataloging and organizing collections. 

MPS 411— Interpretation (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: HIS 
300. 

A study of exhibits, educational programs 
and community outreach, tour planning and 
guiding, publications, electronic media, and 
other interpretation techniques. 

MPS 412— Administration (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: HIS 
300. 

A study of organizational techniques and 
policy, public relations and marketing, mem- 
bership, budgeting, personnel relations, secu- 
rity, insurance and such other topics as are 
pertinent. 

MPS 420— An Introduction to Historic 
Preservation (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: HIS 
300. 

A survey ofthefield including values, princi- 
ples, practices; development of planning and 
organization for preservation: preservation law, 
economics and politics. 

MPS 421— Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of various styles of American archi- 
tecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, Eclec- 
ticism and modern; slides from Historic Ameri- 
can Building Survey; landscape architecture. 
Visiting speakers and field trips will be used. 

MPS 422— Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MPS 207 or permission of the 
instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North 
America since the arrival of European man in 
the New World. Some attention will be paid to 
British and Continental Post Medieval Archae- 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



79 



ology as well as to the special areas of Indus 
trial and Nautical Archaeology Special 
will be given to archaeological method and 
theory both as a perspective fCH the writing of 
history and as a component of Historic Pi 
vation (Identical with HIS 422) 

MPS 495— Internship in Museum Studies 
(V-V-5) 

Prerequisites MPS 41 0,41 1 . and 41 2 with a 
"C" or better in each course. 

The student will pursue an individually de- 
signed course project involving off-campus 
study and research in a government or private 
agency involved in museum work. Projects are 
normally designed to require the full eleven 
week quarter for completion, during which 
time the student will be under the joint supervi- 
sion of the sponsoring agency and his faculty 
sponsor. 

MPS 498— Internship in Preservation 
Studies (V-V-5) 

Prerequisites: MPS 412, 420, 421 with a "C" 
or better in each course. 

The student will pursue an individually de- 
signed course project involving off-campus 
study and research in an appropriate preser- 
vation agency. Projects are normally designed 
to require the full eleven week quarter for 
completion, during which time the student will 
be under the joint supervision of the sponsor- 
ing agency and his faculty sponsor. 

Political Science Offerings 

POS 113— Government of the United 
States (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

A study of the structure, theory, and func- 
tions of the national government in the United 
States and some of the major problems of the 
state and local government. 

POS 213— Parliamentary Procedure (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. 

An introduction into the theory and practice 
of parliamentary procedure in democratic orga- 
nizations. Emphasis will be placed on the rules 
of order as well as on the application in a 
business meeting. 

POS 300— Research Methods (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: POS 113. 

This course deals with the methods and 
techniques of research in the behavioral 
sciences. Emphasis will be placed on learning 
how to evaluate research. (Identical with C.J. 
390). 



POS/PA 304— Politics of Bureaucracy 
(5-0-5) 

red every yeai Prei POS 1 1 3oi 

equivalent 

This is a one-quart- that is primarily 

concerned with organizational theory and bureau- 
cratic behavior, whether public Ol private, but 
with an emphasis on the behavior ol 
bureaucracy of the national government At- 
tention will also be given to political process as 
it unfolds in the administration of laws enacted 
by the Congress. 

POS 306— Local Government (5-0-5) 

Offered every year. Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or 
equivalent. 

A study of the environment, structure, func- 
tion, political processes, and policies of city, 
county and other local governments in the Unit- 
ed States. Special attention will be given tothe 
city governments of Savannah, Ga.; Charles- 
ton, S.C.; and Gainesville, Fla. Large diverse 
cities such as Atlanta, Jacksonville, Tampa, 
and Miami will also be compared in a more 
limited fashion and contrasted with Savannah, 
Charleston, and Gainesville. Policies examined 
will include finance (raising and spending 
money), education, welfare, pollution, trans- 
portation, and law enforcement. 

POS 307— State Government (5-0-5) 

Offered every year. Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or 
equivalent. 

A study of the environment, structure, func- 
tion, political processes, and policies of state 
governments in the United States. Special 
attention will be given to the governments of 
Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina and to 
their role in the federal system. Policies exam- 
ined will include finance (raising and spending 
money), pollution, transportation, and law en- 
forcement. 

POS 317— Constitutional Law I (5-0-5) 

Offered every year. Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or 
equivalent. 

A study of the development of the United 
States government through judicial interpreta- 
tion of the constitution. The case study method 
of analysis is used, but some attention is given 
also to recent behavioral writing on judicial 
decision-making. 

POS 318— Constitutional Law II (5-0-5) 

Offered every year. Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or 
equivalent. 
A continuation of POS 31 7. 



80 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 320— International Relations: The 
Far East (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

Contemporary international politics in the 
Far East are examined in terms of such broad 
historical trends as the decline of imperialism, 
the development of nationalism, and the rise of 
the U.S., USSR., People's Republic of China, 
and Japan as major powers in Asia. 

Some attention will be given to contempo- 
rary key issues such as the Sino-Soviet con- 
flict, the future of Formosa, U.S. -Japan Mutual 
Security Treaty revision, and U.S. -Japan eco- 
nomic interaction. 

POS 325— International Organizations 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

A survey of the development, principles, 
structures and functions of international organi- 
zations, with emphasis upon the role of these 
institutions in the maintenance of peace. 

POS 326— International Law (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to selected public interna- 
tional law topics including: recognition, state 
succession, jurisdiction, extradition, national- 
ity, the law of treaties, the law of diplomacy, 
and the law of war. 

POS 329— International Relations (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission 
of instructor. 

An introduction to the theories, forces, and 
practices dominating contemporary interna- 
tional relations. 

POS 331 -Early Political Thought (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

An historical study of the development of 
ideas relative to the state and government 
from Socrates and Plato to the Seventeenth 
Century. Attention is directed primarily to the 
political thought of a selected group of eminent 
philosophers. 

POS 332— Modern Political Thought (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: POS 331 or permission 
of instructor 

A continuation of POS 331 , from the 1 7th to 
the 20th century. 

POS 333— Contemporary Political 
Ideologies (5-0-5) 

Spring Prerequisite: POS 332 or permission 
of instructor. 
A continuation of POS 332, including a gen- 



eral survey and analysis of the important ideo- 
logical currents of our time with selected 
indepth readings from original sources. 

POS 346— Governments of East Asia (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative examination of the contem- 
porary political institutions, processes, and 
ideas of the People's Republic of China, Japan, 
and Korea. Examines the development of 
these political systems with particular empha- 
sis on historical, social, cultural, and con- 
temporary-issue dimensions. 

POS 348— Governments of Western Europe 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
1 13 or equivalent. 

An analytical and comparative study of the 
major Western European governments, with 
principal emphasis upon the analysis of the 
conditions which led to effective and stable 
parliamentary government and those which 
lead to the inefficiency, instability and break- 
down of such systems. 

POS 349— Government of the Soviet Union 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

The primary purpose of this course is to 
focus on the study of contemporary Soviet 
politics along developmental scheme. Com- 
parison of the pre-modern Tsarist autocratic 
regime and the contemporary Soviet totalitar- 
ian regime will be attempted. Also the course 
will cover such topics as Soviet political cul- 
ture, political socialization process of the mass, 
governmental processes, and the public pol- 
icy making/implementation aspects. 

POS 395— Internship (V-V-(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: Junior (with 3.5 GPA) or Senior 
standing (with a 3.0 GPA minimum). 

The student will pursue an individually de- 
signed course project involving off-campus 
study and research in a government or private 
agency. Projects are normally designed to 
require the full eleven-week quarter for com- 
pletion, during which time the student will be 
under joint supervision by the sponsoring 
agency and his faculty advisor. Application 
and arrangements must be made through the 
department by mid-quarter preceding the 
quarter of the internship. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



81 



POS 400— Senior Seminar (5-0-5) 

Admission will be subject to approval of the 
instructor Ottered on demand Designed to 
permit superior students to pursue research 
and reading in some field of political science 
under the supervision of the staff 

POS/PA 401— Politics of the Budgetary 
Process (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years 

This course examines the procedures, strat- 
egies and rationales involved in making public 
budgets at the local, state, and national levels. 
It is also concerned with critiques of the sev- 
eral types of budgets now in use together with 
an explanation fiscal and monetary policies as 
they affect budgeting. Finally, it is concerned 
with the revenue systems in effect together 
with auditing and other controls exercised in 
the budgeting process. 

POS/PA 403— Public Policy Development 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
304 or permission of the instructor. 

This course is primarily concerned with a 
study of the theoretical aspects of decision- 
making theories (i.e., rational/comprehensive 
model vs. incremental model), political aspects 
of policy-making process, mobilization of polit- 
ical support, and the cost/benefit aspects of 
the public policy-making. 

Some attempt will be made to apply the 
general theory of public policy-making to spe- 
cific settings of welfare policy, urban prob- 
lems, and national defense/foreign policy. 

POS 410— Independent Study in American 
Government (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: A min- 
imum of 1 20 credit hours, including at least 20 
hours in Political Science at the 300-level or 
above. Admission is by approval of a depart- 
mental committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to 
pursue individual research and reading in 
some field of political science under the super- 
vision of a member of the staff. Emphasis will 
be on wide reading, conferences with the 
advisor and written reports and essays. Nor- 
mally open only to students with a B average 
(3.0) in Political Science and at least a 2.5 GPA 
overall. Applications must be filed with the 
Department by mid-quarter preceding the 
quarter independent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 



POS 411— American Presidency (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years 

Offers an in-depth look of the office Of the 

presidency, with the principal emphasis on the 
relations of the executive branch witr 
Congress and the court system Some af 
tion will be given to the evolution of the presi- 
dency to its present dominant position in the 
American political process (Completion of a 
survey course in American History is desirable) 

POS 412— American Political Parties (5-0-5) 

Operation of political parties in the political 
system Relationship between party organiza- 
tion, electoral system, and the recruitment and 
advancement of political leaders 

POS 41 5— American Supreme Court (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An analysis of the structure and functions of 
the Court, including examination of the role of 
the Court as policy maker. 

POS 416— United States Constitutional 
History I (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of the origins, content, and expan- 
sion of the Constitution of United States. (Iden- 
tical with HIS 41 6). 

POS 417— United States Constitutional 
History II (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of more recent constitutional devel- 
opment from the Reconstruction era to the 
present day. (Identical to HIS 41 7). 

POS/PA 418— Administrative Law (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
113. 

This course explores the framework of law 
governing administrative agencies including: 
administrative power and its control by the 
courts, the determination and enforcement of 
administrative programs, discretion of admin- 
istrative officials and their powers of sum- 
mary actions, hearings before administrative 
boards, and the respective spheres of admin- 
istrative and judicial responsibility. 

Some attention will be given to the problem 
of the maintenance of traditional procedural 
safeguards in administrative law and the prob- 
lem of civil rights and relation to administrative 
boards. Leading cases will be examined. 

POS 420— Independent Study in Inter- 
national Relations (V-V-(1-5)) 

Available each quarter. A minimum of 120 
credit hours, including at least 20 hours in 
Political Science at the 300-level or above. 



82 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Admission is by approval of a departmental 
committee 

Designed to permit superior students to 
pursue individual research and reading in 
some field of international relations under the 
supervision of a member of the staff. Emphasis 
will be on wide reading, conferences with the 
advisor and written reports and essays. Nor- 
mally open only to students with a B average 
(3.0) m Political Science and at least a 2.5 GPA 
overall. Applications must be filed with the 
Department by mid-quarter preceding the 
quarter independent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 

POS 424— Seminar on the Sino-Soviet 
Power Rivalries (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

Critical assessment of the early Sino-Soviet 
relations before and after the 1 91 7 Bolshevik 
Revolution, followed by analysis of the roots of 
the Sino-Soviet conflicts in territorial, eco- 
nomic, strategic, political, and ideological per- 
spectives. The implication of this schism forthe 
contemporary global security relations will be 
critically examined. Heavy emphasis on re- 
search and oral presentation by the student. 
Prerequisites: POS 320, 629, 721 or by per- 
mission of the instructor. 

POS 429—American Foreign Policy (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

An analysis of U.S. foreign policy and fac- 
tors, both domestic and foreign, contributing to 
its formulation. 

POS 430— Independent Study in Political 
Theory (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: A min- 
imum of 1 20 credit hours, including at least 20 
hours in Political Science at the 300-level or 
above. Admission is by approval of a depart- 
mental committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to 
pursue individual research and reading in 
some field of political theory under the super- 
vision of a member of the staff. Emphasis will 
be on wide reading, conferences with the 
advisor and written reports and essays. Nor- 
mally open only to students with a B average 
(3.0) in Political Science and at least a 2.5 GPA 
overall. Applications must be filed with the 
Department by mid-quarter preceding the 
quarter independent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 



POS 440— Independent Study in Compara- 
tive Government (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: A min- 
imum of 1 20 credit hours, including at least 20 
hours in Political Science at the 300-level or 
above. Admission is by approval of a depart- 
mental committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to 
pursue individual research and reading in 
some field of comparative government under 
the supervision of a member of the staff. 
Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferen- 
ces with the advisor and written reports and 
essays. Normally open only to students with a 
B average (3.0) in Political Science and at 
least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be 
filed with the Department by mid-quarter pre- 
ceding the quarter independent study is contem- 
plated. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 

POS 445— Comparative Economic Systems 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

The course will constitute a survey of the 
basic tenets of the major economic systems 
developed in the 1 9th and 20th centuries. The 
role of government and politics will be exam- 
ined, along with the contributions to economic 
and political thought of such men as Adam 
Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and 
Milton Freidman. 

Languages, Literatures and 
Dramatic Arts 

Faculty 

Crain, Bradford, Department Head 

Brooks, S. Kent 

Brown, Hugh 

Easterling, William 

Jenkins, Marvin 

Jones, James 

Killorin, Joseph 

Lubs, Margaret, Emerita 

McClanahan, Billie 

Martin, William 

Noble, David 

Nordquist, Richard 

Pendexter, Hugh 

Strozier, Robert 

Suchower, John 

Welsh, John 

White, Charles 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



83 



Entering students should begin the required 
English composition sequence in their initial 
quarter of attendance and must not delay 
beginning this sequence beyond their second 
quarter of attendance Designated composi- 
tion courses may not be dropped without per- 
mission from Dr Cram. Department Head 

Students enrolled in the degree programs 
which require a foreign language must show 
proficiency in the appropriate language at the 
required level by successfully completing stand- 
ardized examinations administered by mem- 
bers of the foreign language faculty. This 
requirement applies to students enrolled at 
Armstrong State College who take their foreign 
language courses on this campus and to stu- 
dents who. while enrolled at Armstrong State 
College, take their foreign language courses 
on another campus Students transferring to 
Armstrong State College, after having com- 
pleted the required foreign language sequence 
at another college, with grades of "C" or 
above, are not required to complete the profi- 
ciency examinations at Armstrong. 

Entering freshmen who wish to exempt the 
foreign language requirement may do so by 
successfully completing the proficiency exam- 
ination through the level required in a specific 
degree program. For further information on the 
exemption process, the student should con- 
tact the Head of the Department of Lan- 
guages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

Students majoring in English or in Drama- 
Speech should satisfy the college core require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Arts degree during 
the freshman and sophomore years. Students 
must earn a grade of "C" or better in each 300 
or 400 level course included in any major or 
minor area 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN ENGLISH 

Hours 

A General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200. 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS200; PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 or 193 and 103 or 

290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence . . 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 



2 One cour led from AN I 

101 

SOC201 5 

Area IV 30 

i I oreign language m . 

through 201 20 

2 Two courses selected from 
ART 200, 271. 272. 273. DRS 
227. 228; MUS 200, PHI 201 ... . 10 

AreaV 6 

1 PE 103 or 100 and 1 1 / 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B Courses in the Major Field 45 

1 ENG 326, 406 10 

2. One course from: ENG 300, 302. 
304,320 10 

3. One course from: ENG 305, 

306, 307 5 

4. One course from: ENG 308. 
309,310 5 

5. ENG 327 or 328 5 

6. One course from: ENG 325. 340, 
342.344, 410,422 5 

7. Two courses in English literature 

or language 10 

C. Related Field Requirements 25 

Courses numbered 300 or above 
in: Art, Drama/Speech, History, 
Journalism, Literature, Linguistics, 
Music, Philosophy 25 

D. Electives 20 

E. Regents' Examination _0 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN ENGLISH (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS 200; PHI 200 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 

or 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence ..10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence 

through 201 20 



84 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



2 DRS228or341 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 
201 ; ECO 201 , 202; SOC 201 ... . 5 
Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. ENG 326, 327 or 328, 344, 

406 20 

2. One course from: ENG 300, 302, 
304, 305, 306, 307, 320 5 

3. One course from: ENG 308, 309, 
310 5 

4. One course from: ENG 325, 41 0, 
422 5 

5 One course from: ENG 327, 328, 
400,401,402, 490, 491 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

1. ENG 332 and DRS/FLM 350 

or 351 10 

2. PHI 400 or approved elective 5 

D. Professional Sequences 45 

1. EDN 200; EDU 310, 335, 422, 
439,481,482,483 40 

2. PSY301 5 

E. Regents' Examination _0 

TOTAL 201 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN DRAMA-SPEECH 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 1 01 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS200;PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence . . 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS113 15 

2 One course selected from: ANT 

201; ECO 201; PSY 101; SOC 

201 5 

Area IV 30 

1 Foreign language sequence 

through 201 20 

2. DRS227, 228 10 

AreaV 6 

1 PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. DRS 341, 342, 345, 346; ENG 
326 25 

2. Two courses from: DRS 450, 
451,452 10 

3. One course from: DRS 340, 347, 
350,351 5 

4. One course from: DRS 400; 

ENG 400, 401,402 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 30 

1. ENG 320, 322, 330, 406 20 

2. One course from: ANT 200, 271, 
272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

3. One course from: LIN 325, 410, 
422, 485 5 

D. Electives 15 

E. Regents' Examination _0 

TOTAL 191 



Minor Concentrations 

The following minor concentrations are 
available from the Department of Languages, 
Literature and Dramatic Arts. For completion 
of each of the minors, the student must earn a 
grade of "C" or better in each course offered 
for the minor. 

The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 
American Civilization 25 

1. AC 382, 490 10 

2. AC/ENG 308, 309, 310 or AC/ 
HIS 351, 352, 377, 403 15 

Drama-Speech 25 

1. DRS 228 5 

2. DRS electives at the 300-400 
level 20 

English 20 

English electives at the 300- 
400 level 20 

Film 20 

1. DRS/FLM 340,351 10 

2. DRS/FLM 350 (repeated) 10 

Foreign Language 25 

25 hours in any one language . . 25 

Journalism 20 

Courses selected from: ENG/ 
JRN 340; DRS/JRN 347, 350; 

JRN 343,364,400 20 

Linguistics 20 

Courses selected from ENG/LIN 
325, 340, 41 0; LIN 400, 485 .... 20 

Philosophy 20 

Philosophy electives at the 300- 
400 level 20 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



85 



OFFERINGS 



American Civilization Offerings 

AC 225— Introduction to American 
Civilization (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand 

Themes and issues of American Civilization 
since colonial times, with emphasis on modern 
setting, using interdisciplinary approaches. 

AC 308— American I: Beginnings through 
1830 (5-0-5) 

Fall Same as ENG 308 

AC 309— American II: Emerson through 
Twain (5-0-5) 

Winter Same as ENG 309 

AC 310— American III: Rise of Naturalism 
to the Present (5-0-5) 

Spring Same as ENG 310 

AC 382— Directed Reading in American 
Culture (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Ten hours 
in approved American Civilization courses. 

A study of both fine and popular arts of the 
United States under the supervision of an 
American Civilization staff member 

AC 403— American Material Culture (4-2-5) 

Offered alternate years. Same as ANT/MPS 
403 

An introduction to the study of the non- 
literary remains of our society, past and pres- 
ent Vernacular and polite architecture, ceram- 
ics, mortuary art, community and settlement 
patterns, dress, diet, and disease are among 
the topics that will be discussed. 

AC 490— Independent Study (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all 
other requirements of the American Civiliza- 
tion minor 

Designed to permit the student to pursue 
individual research in some aspects of Ameri- 
can Civilization under the supervision of an 
American Civilization staff member. 

Drama-Speech Offerings 

Successful completion of ENG 101 is pre- 
requisite to all DRS courses with the exception 
of DRS227. 

DRS 227— Theatre Laboratory (0-3-1) 

Offered every quarter. 

Practical experience in theatre. The student 
will work on the Masquers' production of the 
quarter. Only one hour of credit may be earned 



urn total credit all* . 
in Theatre Laborati >urs 

In th- *o five 

hours credit in DRS 227 by wort 

in sumii • 

DRS 228 — Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5) 

Off* • . quartet 

Practice and theory of oral communication 
Each student makes several major speeches 
The physiology of the speech mechanisms is 
covered, and articulation is studied within the 
framework of the International Phonetic Alpha- 
bet 

DRS/FLM 340— Development of the Cinema 
(5-0-5) 

Winter Same as FLM 340 

A study of the history and development of 
the cinema with special emphasis on the 
American dominance of the medium 

DRS 341— Oral Interpretation (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

A practical course in the oral interpretation 
of poetry and prose. The techniques of literary 
analysis are stressed along with the vocal 
techniques needed to communicate an author's 
mood and meaning. 

DRS 342— Advanced Acting (5-0-5) 

Alternates with DRS 345, Winter. Prerequi- 
sites: ENG 1 01 plus at least two credit hours in 
DRS 227. 

Intensive study of characterization and styles 
of acting from several points: historical, criti- 
cal, practical, theoretical, and experimental. 
Emphasis on development performance skills. 

DRS 345— History of the Theatre (5-0-5) 

Alternate with DRS 342, Winter. 

A survey of theatrical art from its beginning 
to the present day. The course emphasizes the 
development of the physical theatre. 

DRS 346— Play Production (5-0-5) 

Alternating Spring quarters 

A course in the theory and practice of acting 
and directing, with special attention to image- 
making on stage. Individuals under supervi- 
sion prepare and execute the production of 
scenes and short plays. 

DRS/JRN 347— Basic TV Production (2-9-5) 

Alternates with DRS 400, Spring, Fall. 

A course in the theory and practice of televi- 
sion production styles, forms, and concepts, 
with special emphasis on the critical apprecia- 
tion of electronic communication techniques. 

DRS/FLM/JRN 350— Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM 350 and JRN 350. 



86 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Study of film theories or genres with empha- 
sis on critical appreciation of film as an art 
form (Course may be repeated when topic 
changes). 

DRS/FLM 351— Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Summer Same as FLM 351 . 

Studies in the translation of literature to film 
with emphasis on the differences of the media 
in form, content and perception. 

DRS 400— Special Topics (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Alternates with DRS 347, Spring, Fall. Pre- 
requisite: ENG 101. 

The special subject matter in this course will 
be determined and announced by the profes- 
sor at the time when the course is offered. 

DRS 450-451-452— Drama Workshop 
(0-15-5) 

Summer only. 

This course is summer stock theatre for 
credit Students will be directed and instructed 
by a member of the faculty who is a profes- 
sional in the theatre. All aspects of production 
will be studied. 

DRS 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Senior 
status plus ENG 1 01 plus at least one 300 level 
DRS course. Open to transient students only 
with the permission of Dean of Faculty at Arm- 
strong and the college from which the student 
comes. 

English Offerings 

ENG 025— Composition Review (5-0-5) 

Institutional Credit. Offered on demand. 

A course designed to correct deficiencies in 
writing revealed by the Regents Examination. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the English core 
requirements of the student's program or per- 
mission of the Head of the Department of Lan- 
guages, Literature and Dramatic Arts. 

ENG 100— Practical Writing (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

This course is for the student who demon- 
strates competence in constructing senten- 
ces and paragraphs but who needs instruction 
in such skills as the use of more complicated 
sentence patterns, the coordination and sub- 
ordination of ideas in the paragraph, and the 
organization of paragraphs into short essays. 
The student will write in different rhetorical 
modes using various resources, including per- 
sonal experience. The course is recommended 
as an elective for the student whose writing 
skills may have dulled from lack of practice. 
This course may be taken as elective credit 



but may not satisfy the requirements in Area I 
of the Core. 

ENG 101— Composition I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Assignment of this course is based upon the 
results of the Diagnostic Test for placement in 
beginning English courses or upon successful 
completion of English 99, 100, or 110. This 
course is for the student having demonstrable 
ability in reading, writing, and organizing. The 
student will sharpen his skills by writing themes 
of varying length and complexity utilizing tech- 
niques learned from intensive study of essays 
in four rhetorical modes (description, narra- 
tion, exposition, and argumentation). The 
course also aims to increase the student's 
awareness of language itself. Readings in 
addition to the essay may be used. 

ENG 102— Composition II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Satisfac- 
tory completion of ENG 1 01 or ENG 1 91 . 

This course continues to give the student 
guided practice in reading and compositional 
skills. To accomplish that end, the course 
introduces literary forms and language— fiction, 
poetry, drama— using readings in and study of 
those forms to stimulate the writing of interpre- 
tive and critical papers. 

ENG 110— English as a Foreign Language 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

This course is designed to prepare students 
whose native language is other than English to 
do normal college work in composition. Stu- 
dents who pass the course will be eligible for 
ENG 101 or, upon recommendation by the 
instructor, for ENG 1 02. Admission is by place- 
ment test or by permission of the instructor. 
The course may not be used in Area I of the 
Core unless the student meets the proficiency 
level for admission to ENG 102. 

ENG 191— Honors Composition (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Instruction in this course will not follow the 
traditional lecture method only; the student will 
read widely and write critical papers in the 
fashion which the instructor thinks will best dis- 
cipline him for independent study. This course 
replaces ENG 1 01 for students selected by the 
department on the basis of admission test 
scores. 

ENG 192— Honors Composition and Intro- 
duction to Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 191 or a grade of "A" ir 
ENG 101. Winter. 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



8/ 



In this course the student will read more 
extensively than for ENG 102 and will .-. 
research pa| 

ENG 201— Composition III (5-0-5) 

Ottered each quarter Prerequisite ENG 
102 or ENG 192 ENG 201 is prerequisite tor all 
ENG 300-400 courses 

This course completes the Core I composi- 
tion sequence in the development ot reading 
and writing effectiveness Organized around 
literary and extra-literary materials, the course 
facilitates student investigation of enduring 
issues and ideas. Research techniques are 
introduced. Specific topics treated in each 
section of this course will be announced 
quarterly 

ENG 222— Topics in the Humanities (5-0-5) 

Offered Fall and alternate Spring quarters 
Prerequisite: ENG 201. 

A thematic aproach to major works in the 
humanities designed to awaken and heighten 
the student's awareness of traditional and con- 
temporary issues. Topics will be announced. 

Please Note: ENG 201 is prerequisite to all the 
following ENG courses. 

ENG 300— Early English Literature 
Beginnings through 1603 (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 302, Fall. 

ENG 302— 17th Century British Poetry 
and Prose: 1603-1700 (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 300, Fall. 

ENG 304— 18th Century British Poetry 
and Prose (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

ENG 305— 19th Century I: British Romantic 
Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

ENG 306— 19th Century II: British Victorian 
Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 307, Spring. 

ENG 307— 20th Century British Poetry 
and Prose (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 306, Spring. 

ENG 308— American I: Beginnings through 
1830 (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

ENG 309— American II: Emerson through 
Twain (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

ENG 310— American III: Rise of Naturalism 
to the Present (5-0-5) 

Spring. 



ENG 320— British Drama: Beginnings 
through 1750 (5-0-5) 

Alt.- • t NG 322. Wint.-r 

ENG 322— British, American, and 
Continental Drama: Ibsen to the 
Present (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 320. Winter 

ENG/LIN 325— Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 410, Spring 
This is a study of current approaches to 
grammar (including generative transforma- 
tional); phonology, morphology and syntax will 
be studied. 

ENG 326— Introduction to Literary 
Studies (5-0-5) 

Offered Fall and alternate Spring quarters 
The course aims to familiarize the English 
major with the vocabulary and approaches of 
modern literary criticism, to advance abilities 
in the reading and interpretation of literary 
texts, and to promote understanding of the 
tools of literary research and writing. 

ENG 327— World Literature I (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

A study of major works and movements in 
world literature through the Renaissance. 

ENG 328— World Literature II (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

A study of major works and movements in 
modern world literature. 

ENG 329— Ancient Epic (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 330, Spring. 

ENG 330— Ancient Drama (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 329, Spring. 

ENG 331— Children's Literature (5-0-5) 

(Does not apply toward English major). 
Offered on demand. 

A study of significant literature for children: 
traditional, early, and modern; poetry and prose. 

ENG 332— Literature for Adolescents (5-0-5) 

(Does not apply toward the English major 
except for candidates for secondary teacher 
certification). Alternates with ENG 400, Winter. 

A study of significant literature appropriate 
for adolescents. 

ENG/JRN 340— Advanced Composition 
(5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 342. Fall. Prerequisite: 
ENG 201 or consent of instructor. 

The study of expository and argumentative 
techniques. 



88 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ENG 342— Creative Writing (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 340, Fall. Prerequisite: 
ENG 201 or consent of instructor. 

ENG 344— Composition for Pre- 

Professionals (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 422. Winter. 

This course provides students with the oppor- 
tunity to polish and diversify their writing skills. 
It includes the analysis of diverse prose mod- 
els and introduces such topics as the theory 
and practice of technical writing and commun- 
ication skills, topics appropriate for students 
interested in such fields as education, busi- 
ness, science and law. 

ENG 400— Special Topic (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 332, Winter. 
The special subject matter in this course will 
be announced when the course is offered. 

ENG 401— Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 402, Summer. 
The special subject matter in this course will 
be announced when the course is offered. 

ENG 402— Special Author (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 401 , Summer. 
The special subject matter in this course will 
be announced when the course is offered. 

ENG 406— Shakespeare (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

ENG/LIN 410— History of English 
Language (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 325, Spring. 

ENG/LIN 422— Approaches to Language 
(5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 344, Winter. 

A survey of the components or language 
study as well as the various approaches to 
language, meaning, and syntax. Relationships 
between the teacher's language study and 
classroom implementation of various facets of 
it will be explored. 

ENG/LIN 485— Dialects of American 
English (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG/LIN 325 or DRS 228. 

Investigates and describes major American 
dialects in terms of their phonology, morphol- 
ogy, lexicon, and syntax. Both geographic and 
social dialects are covered. 

ENG 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status and ENG 201. 
Open to transient students only with the per- 
mission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. 



ENG 491— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status and ENG 201. 
Open to transient students only with the per- 
mission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. 

Film Offerings 

FLM/DRS 340— Development of the Cinema 
(5-0-5) 

Winter. 

A study of the history and development of 
the cinema with special emphasis on the 
American dominance of the medium. 

FLM/DRS 350— Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as JRN 350 

Study of film theories or genres with empha- 
sis on critical appreciation of film as an art 
form. (Course may be repeated when topic 
changes). 

FLM/DRS 351— Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Summer. 

Studies in the translation of literature to film 
with emphasis on the differences of the media 
in form, content, and perception. 

Foreign Language Offerings 

FRE 101-102-103— Elementary French 
One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Three courses offered each year. 

These courses provide the student with the 
elements of French reading, composition, and 
conversation. A course for beginners. The 
approach is primarily oral, and daily practice 
with tape recordings is required. To receive 
credit for FRE 103, a student must success- 
fully complete the appropriate national stand- 
ardized test. 

FRE 201— Intermediate French (5-0-5) 

" Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Three 
quarters of college French or three years of 
high school French. 

Further reading of text, and oral and com- 
position practice. To receive credit for FRE 
201, a student must pass the appropriate 
national standardized test. 

FRE 300— Special Topics in the French 
Language (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: FRE 201. 

FRE 305— Special Topics in French 
Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: FRE 201 . 

FRE 307— Special Topics in French 
Culture (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite: FRE 201 . 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



89 



FRE 351-352-353— Study Abroad In 
France (V-V-15) 

requisite fre 103. 
These courses are a summer quarter's resi- 
dence and study in France in conjunction with 
the Studies Abroad Program ot the University 
System ot Georgia The program is in Paris tor 
a period ot 8-9 weeks During this time the 
student will receive intensive instruction in 
language and culture and will be expected to 
engage in co-curncular activities sponsored 
by the University of Pans and USG 

FRE 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status and FRE 201. 
Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 

GER 101-102-103— Elementary German 
One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Three courses offered each year. 

Elements of reading and writing; basic vocab- 
ulary; simple conversation; essentials of gram- 
mar To receive credit for GER 1 03, a student 
must pass the appropriate national standard- 
ized test. 

GER 201— Intermediate German (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Three 
quarters of college German or three years of 
high school German. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composi- 
tion practice. To receive credit for GER 201 , a 
student must pass the appropriate national 
standardized test. 

GER 300— Special Topics in the German 
Language (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: GER 201 . 

GER 305— Special Topics in German 
Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: GER 201 . 

GER 307— Special Topics in German 
Culture (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: GER 201 . 

3ER 351-352-353— Study Abroad in 
Germany (V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: GER 103. 

These courses are a summer quarter's resi- 
dence and study in Germany in conjunction 
vith the Studies Abroad Program of the Uni- 
/ersity System of Georgia. The program is at 
he University of Erlangen-Nurnberg for a 
period of 8-9 weeks. During this time the stu- 
ient will receive intensive instruction in lan- 
guage and culture and will participate in Uni- 

ersity sponsored activities. 



GER 490— Independent Study (1-5)0(1-5) 

r ed on demand l 
-.t.itus and GER 201 Open to transient 

dents only with permission of the Dean of 
Faculty at Armstrong and the college from 
which the student comes 



LAT 101-102-103— Elementary Latin 
One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Three courses offered each year 
Essentials of grammar, readings from se- 
lected Latin authors. 

LAT 201— Intermediate Latin (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand 

Further readings in Latin literature with spe- 
cial emphasis on Vergil and Ovid. 

LAT 300— Readings in Latin (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand 

The students may choose readings relevant 
to their areas of interest out of the 2,000 years 
of Latinity from Plautus to the recent encycli- 
cals. 

LAT/CLA 351-352-353— Study Abroad in 
Rome and Athens (V-V-15) 

These courses are a summer quarter's resi- 
dence and study in Rome and Athens in con- 
junction with the Studies Abroad Program of 
the University System of Georgia. They are 
taught in English and require no knowledge of 
Latin or Greek. Through visits to monuments, 
museums, and classical ruins, and on excur- 
sions of Crete, Delphi, Ostia, Tivoli, Tarquinia, 
and Frascati the student experiences at first 
hand the reality of life in the ancient world. 

RUS 101-102-103— Elementary Russian 
One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Three courses offered each year. 

These courses provide the student with the 
elements of Russian reading, composition, 
and conversation. To receive credit for RUS 
103, a student must pass the appropriate 
national standardized test. 

RUS 201— Intermediate Russian (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: RUS 103. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composi- 
tion practice. To receive credit for RUS 201 , a 
student must pass the appropriate national 
standardized tests. 



SPA 101-102-103— Elementary Spanish 
One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Three courses offered each year. 
These courses provide the student with the 
elements of Spanish reading, composition, 



90 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



and conversation. To receive credit for Span- 
ish 103, a student must pass the appropriate 
national standardized test 

SPA 201— Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Three 
quarters of college Spanish or three years of 
high school Spanish. 

Further readings of texts, oral and composi- 
tion practice To receive credit for SPA 201 , a 
student must successfully pass the appro- 
priate national standardized test. 

SPA 300— Special Topics in the Spanish 
Language (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: SPA 201 . 

SPA 305— Special Topics in Spanish 
Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: SPA 201 . 

SPA 307— Special Topics in Spanish 
Culture (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: SPA 201 . 

SPA 351-352-353— Study Abroad in 
Spain (V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: SPA 103. 

These courses are a summer quarter's resi- 
dence and study in Spain in conjunction with 
the Studies Abroad Program of the University 
System of Georgia. The program is in Segovia 
for a period of 8-9 weeks. During this time the 
students will receive intensive instruction in 
language and culture which will be comple- 
mented by a number of excursions. 

SPA 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Senior 
status and SPA 201. Open to transient stu- 
dents only with the permission of the Dean of 
Faculty at Armstrong and the college from 
which the student comes. 

Journalism Offerings 

JRN 227— Journalism Laboratory (0-3-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Practical experience in journalism. Students 
will work under instruction on the college 
newspaper staff. Only one hour's credit may 
be earned per quarter. The maximum total 
credit allowed in Journalism Laboratory is five 
quarter hours. Admission by permission of the 
instructor. 

JRN 340— Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 342. Fall. Prerequisite: 
ENG 201 or consent of instructor Same as 
ENG 340 

The study of expository and report tech- 
niques. 



JRN 343— Journalistic Writing (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ENG 201. 

Investigation of and intensive practice in the 
techniques of modern journalism with empha- 
sis on writing for newspapers and periodicals. 

JRN 347— Basic TV Production (2-9-5) 

Alternates with DRS 400, Spring, Fall. Same 
as DRS 347. 

A course in the theory and practice of televi- 
sion production styles, forms, and concepts, 
with special emphasis on the critical apprecia- 
tion of electronic communication techniques. 

JRN 350— Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM/DRS 350. 

Study of film theories or genres with empha- 
sis on critical appreciation of film as an art 
form. (Course may be repeated when topic 
changes). 

JRN 364— Copy Editing and Layout (2-0-2) 

Fall. Prerequisite: JRN 340 or 343 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

This is an intensive workshop in preparing 
copy for the press. Emphasis is on editing, on 
rewriting, and on makeup of pages. 

JRN 400— Topics in Journalism (3-0-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: JRN 340 or 343 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

This is a seminar on topics of interest and 
utility to journalists in all the media. Individual 
topics will be announced. The course may be 
taken for credit more than once as topics 
change. 



Linguistics Offerings 

LIN 325— Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 410, Spring. Same as 
ENG/LIN325. 

This is a study of current approaches to 
grammar (including generative transforma- 
tional); phonology, morphology, and syntax will 
be studied. 

LIN 340— Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 342, Fall. Prerequisite 
ENG 201 or consent of instructor. Same as 
ENG/JRN340. 

A study of expository and report techniques 

LIN 400— Topics in Linguistics (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: ENG/LIN 325 or 410 or LIN 
485 or permission of the instructor. 

A seminar in subjects of interest in botf 
theoretical and applied linguistics. Topics wil 
be announced, and the course may be taker 
more than once for credit as topics change. I 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



n 



LIN 410— HIttory of the English Language 
(5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 325. Spring Same as 
ENG LIN 410 

LIN 485— Dialects of American English 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite ENG/ LIN 325 or DRS 228 
Investigates and describes major American 
dialects in terms of their phonology, morphol- 
ogy, lexicon, and syntax Both geographic and 
social dialects are covered. 

Philosophy Offerings 

Please Note ENG 101 is prerequisite to all 
following PHI courses 

PHI 200— Nature, Culture and Choice 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

The central notion is that man transforms 
nature into culture by means of symbol sys- 
tems The course asks what needs of human 
nature are served thereby and what ethical 
consequences are involved. It stresses the 
assumptions and methods defining the humani- 
ties and science and, in ethics, focuses on 
professional issues. 

PHI 201 —Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the mean- 
ing and function of philosophy, and the vocab- 
ulary and problems of philosophy. Includes a 
survey of the basic issues and major types of 
philosophy and shows the sources in expe- 
rience, history, and representative thinkers. 

PHI 301— History of Philosophy: Ancient 
and Medieval (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

An historical introduction to philosophy, trac- 
ing the development of European philosophy 
from the early Greeks through the Middle 
Ages, with emphasis on selected works of 
major philosophers. 

PHI 302— History of Modern Philosophy 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

European philosophy from the Renaissance 
through Kant, emphasizing selected works of 
major philosophers. 

PHI 303— 19th and 20th Century 
Philosophy (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of the major philosophers in philo- 
sophical movements of the 19th and 20th 
centuries. 



PHI 400— Special Topics (1-5)0(1-5) 

One 200- 
300 level philosophy coi. 

The specific subj« In this course 

will be determined and announced by the pro- 
fessor at the time when the course is otff ••• 

PHI 490— Independent Study (1-5)0(1-5) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite Senior 
status and one 300-level philosophy course 

The student, with the advise and consent of 
his supervising professor and of the depart- 
ment head, will select the topic for supervised 
independent study and will submit a prospec- 
tus for department approval before the quarter 
in which the course is to be taken Open to 
transient students only with permission of the 
Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 



Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Faculty 

Leska, Charles, Department Head 

Barnard, Jane 

Cyphert, Daniel 

Findeis, John 

Hansen, John 

Harbin, Mickie Sue 

Hudson, Anne 

Kilhefner, Dale 

Munson, Richard 

Norwich, Vickie 

Richters, Stephen 

Shipley, Charles 

Stocker, Erich 

Wynn, William, Emeritus 



The department offers two majors, in com- 
puter science and in the mathematical scien- 
ces, under the Bachelor of Science degree 
program. Under the major in the mathematical 
sciences, students may complete major options 
entitled "Mathematics," "Applied Mathemat- 
ics," "Mathematics Education," and "Comput- 
er Science." The mathematics education op- 
tion is specifically designed to prepare teachers 
of secondary mathematics and is an approved 
program for the Georgia Teacher's Profes- 
sional Four-Year Certificate (T-4). The Depart- 
ment of Mathematics and Computer Science 
also participates in the Dual-Degree Program 
of Armstrong State College and the Georgia 



92 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Institute of Technology, under which students 
may, in five years of study, earn simultane- 
ously the B.S. degree in the mathematical 
sciences (applied mathematics) from Arm- 
strong and the Bachelor's degree in any one of 
a number of fields of engineering from Georgia 
Tech. 

The department also offers minors in comput- 
er science and mathematics. Students in any 
major program of study whatever (either two- 
year or four-year) can augment their major 
with either of these minors. The minor in com- 
puter science requires 25 quarter hours of 
computer science courses. These courses 
must consist of CS 11 or CS 1 46, CS 231 , CS 
306, and 1 quarter hours of additional comput- 
er science courses which meet the following 
conditions: 

a. not to include CS 1 1 0, CS 1 1 5, or CS 1 46, 

b. not to include CS 496, CS 497, or CS 498, 

c. to include at least 5 quarter hours at the 
300-400 level. 

The mathematics minor requires 25 hours of 
mathematics courses. These courses must 
consist of MAT 206, 207, 208, and 10 quarter 
hours selected from MAT 220, CS 260, and 
300-400 level mathematics courses, exclud- 
ing MAT 391 and 393. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS200; PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 
102; CHE 128, 129 (required for 
dual degree students); PHY 
217,218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 10 

2. POS 1 1 3 and one course select- 
ed from: PSY 101 (required for 
math education option); SOC 

201 ; ECO 201 , 202; ANT 201 ... 10 
Area IV 30 

1. MAT 206, 207 10 

2. CS 110 or 146 5 

3. Two of the following: 

MAT 208; CS 240, 260 10 

4. HIS 251 or 252 5 



AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 51-55 

Each student majoring in the 
mathematical sciences must 
select one of the following four 
options and complete its require- 
ments: 
Option One— Mathematics: 

1. MAT 309, 311, 316, 317, 401, 
402, and 4 quarter hours of ap- 
proved electives 30 

2. Approved mathematics and/or 
computer science electives* ... 1 5 

3. One foreign language or com- 
puter science sequence 10 

Option Two— Applied Mathematics: 

1. MAT 309, 316, 341, 342 or 

353 18-19 

2. MAT 220 or CS 240 5 

3. PHY 217, 218, 219; or four of 
the courses: MAT 317, 321, 
322, 346, 353, 401, 406, 

490** 16-19 

4. Approved mathematics and/or 
computer science electives 
(300-400 level) 13-16 

Option Three— Mathematics Education 

1. MAT 220, 311, 316, 336, and 
416 or 470 23 

2. Approved mathematics and/or 
computer science electives 7 

3. PSY 301 5 

4. EDN 200, 31 0, 335, and 441 ... . 20 
Option Four— Computer Science 

1 . CS 260, 301 , 302, 305, 360 25 

2. MAT 309, 341 , 220 or 321 14 

3. Three courses selected from: 
MAT 316, 342, 346, 353, 490**, 
CS 401, 411, 490** 12-15 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

In addition to the above require- 
ments, each student majoring in 
the mathematical sciences must 
complete fifteen quarter hours of 
approved courses in one field of 
study related to his major. Stu- 
dents completing the major re- 
quirements under option three 
must meet this requirement through I 
student teaching (Education 470, 
480, 490). 

D. Electives*** 25-29 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 1 91 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



93 



• It is recommended that 10 of these hours 
be in mathematics 

r Subject to the approval of the department 
head 

•"Students pursuing the mathematics educa- 
tion option, in order that their total program of 
study will conform to system-wide require- 
ments for degree programs leading to T-4 
teacher certification, must select one course 
from each of the following blocks of courses: 

A. ART 200. 271. 272, 273; MUS 200; 

DRS 228; 
B ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272. 273; ENG 222; 
MUS 200; PHI 200.201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 
102; CHE 128. 129 PHY 
217,218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 10 

2. POS 1 1 3 and one of the courses: 
PSY 1 01 ; SOC 201 ; ECO 201 , 202; 
ANT 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. MAT 206, 207 10 

2. CS 146, 231.240 15 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in Major Field 55 

1. MAT 220 or 321 and 260 10 

2. CS 301 , 302, 305, 306, 342 25 

3. Either CS 331, 431, 332 or 401; 
or CS 360, 401 ,402 or 445 15 

4. Five quarter hours of approved 
computer science electives 5 

C. Related Field 15 

D. Electives 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 1 91 



OFFERINGS 
Mathematics Offerings 

MAT 101— College Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring Summi ;uisite 

Each student must have attained at least one 
of the following prior to enrolling (a) a scor- 
at least 420 on the mathematics portion of the 
SAT: or (b) a score of at least 20 on the 
Mathematics Diagnostic Test; or (c) a grade of 
"P" in MAT 099. 

In addition, it is recommended that the stu- 
dent have successfully completed in high 
school two courses of algebra and one course 
of geometry. 

Dates on which the Mathematics Diagnostic 
test is administered are given in the academic 
calendar in the front of this Catalog. Present 
text: Swokowski, Fundamentals of College 
Algebra. 

Real number arithmetic; polynomial and 
rational expressions; linear and quadratic equa- 
tions; functions and graphs; inequalities; abso- 
lute value; sequences and summation nota- 
tion; matrices, determinants, and systems of 
equations; the binomial theorem; techniques 
of counting and elementary probability. (May 
be exempted by examination with academic 
credit awarded). 

MAT 103— Pre- Calculus Mathematics 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 101, or a score of at least 550 on the 
mathematics portion of the SAT, or permission 
of the department head. Present text: Flanders 
and Price, Precalculus Mathematics. 

Functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, 
logarithmic, trignometric, and inverse trigno- 
metric functions; trignometric identities; law of 
sines and cosines; complex numbers, (may be 
exempted by examination with academic credit 
awarded). 

MAT 195— Applied Finite Mathematics 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 1 01 . Present text: 
Barnett, Finite Mathematics for Management, 
Life, and Social Sciences. 

A survey of finite mathematics, including 
mathematics of finance, probability, linear pro- 
gramming, and an introduction to games and 
decisions; applications are stressed throughout. 

MAT 206— Calculus I (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 103, or a score of at least 600 on the 
mathematics portion of the SAT, or permission 



94 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



of the department head. Present text: Edwards 
and Penney, Calculus and Analytical Geometry . 
Functions; the derivative and its applica- 
tions, antidifferentiation; the definite integral. 

MAT 207— Calculus II (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 206 Present text: Edwards and Penney, 
Calculus and Analytic Geometry. 

Techniques and applications of integration; 
conic sections and polar coordinates. 
MAT 208— Calculus of Several Variables I 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 207. 
Present text: Edwards and Penney, Calculus 
and Analytic Geometry. 

Parametric curves and vectors in the plane; 
indeterminate forms, Taylor's formula, and 
improper integrals; infinite series; vectors, 
curves, and surfaces in space; partial differenti- 
ation. 

MAT 220— Elementary Statistics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 101. Present text: Freund, Statistics: A 
First Course. 

Measures of central tendency and disper- 
sion; probability distributions; inferences con- 
cerning means; analysis of variance; correla- 
tion; linear regression. (May be exempted 
by examination with academic credit awarded). 

MAT 260— Discrete Structures (5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: MAT 1 03 and CS 
110 or 146. 

Elementary logic, naive set theory, relations 
and functions, Boolean algebras, ordering re- 
lations, graph theory. 

MAT 290— Topics in Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 101. 

A terminal course of selected topics de- 
signed to portray the history, philosophy, and 
aesthetics of mathematics, and to develop an 
appreciation of the role of mathematics in 
western thought and contemporary culture. 

MAT 309— Calculus of Several Variables II 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 208. Present 
text: Edwards and Penney, Calculus and Ana- 
lytic Geometry. 

Multiple integrals and their applications; 
vector fields; line and surface integrals; Green's 
theorem; the Divergence theorem; Stokes 
theorem; differential equations. 

MAT 311— Abstract Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall (even years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 



260. Present text: Hillman and Alexanderson, 
A First Undergraduate Course in Abstract 
Algebra. 

Elementary properties of integers; groups, 
rings, and fields; mappings, homomorphisms, 
kernals, and quotient structures. 

MAT 316— Linear Algebra I (5-0-5) 

Winter Prerequisite: MAT 208, 260. Present 
texts: Kolman, Elementary Linear Algebra. 

Linear systems and matrices; vector spa- 
ces; linear independence, rank of a matrix; 
linear transformations; determinants; linear prod- 
uct spaces; introduction to eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors. 

MAT 317— Linear Algebra II (3-0-3) 

Spring (odd years). Prerequisite: MAT 316. 

Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonahza- 
tion, real quadratic forms; additional applica- 
tions of linear algebra to other areas of the 
mathematical, physical and social sciences. 

MAT 321-322— Probability and Mathe- 
matical Statistics I, II (5-0-5) 

Fall (even years): 322 (4-0-4)-Winter (odd 
years). Prerequisite: MAT 208. Present text: 
DeGroot, Probability and Statistics. 

Probability spaces; random variables; alge- 
bra of expectation; random sampling; the law 
of large numbers; correlation and regression. 

MAT 336— Modern Geometry (5-0-5) 

Fall (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 
260. Present text: Moise, Elementary Geome- 
try From Advanced Standpoint. 

A survey of topics from Euclidean geometry. 

MAT 341-342— Differential Equations 
I, II (4-0-4) 

341 -Winter; 342-Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 
208. Present text: Boyce and Deprima, Ele- 
mentary Differential Equations and Boundary 
Value Problems. 

Ordinary differential equations; series solu- 
tions; systems of first order differential equa- 
tions; the Laplace transform; introduction to 
Fourier series; partial differential equation; 
Sturm-Liouville theory; applied problems. 

MAT 346— Mathematical Modeling and 
Optimization (4-0-4) 

Fall (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 
260. Present text: Hillier & Lieberman, Intro- 
duction to Operations Research. 

Design, solution, and interpretation of mathe- 
matical models of problems in the social, life, 
and management sciences. Topics chosen 
from linear programming, dynamic program- 
ming, schedulingtheory, Markov chains, game 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



95 



theory, queuing theory, and inventory theory 

MAT 353— Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Summer (even years) Pren MAT 

207 and CS 110 Present text Conte and 
DeBoor. Elementary Numerical Analysis 

Numerical error, polynomial interpolation, 
systems of linear equations, numerical inte- 
gration and numerical solution of differential 
equations, matrix inversion; evaluation of de- 
terminants, calculation of eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors; boundary value problems. 

MAT 360— Mathematical Logic (5-0-5) 

Spring (odd years) Prerequisites: MAT 207. 
260 Present text: Hunter. Metalogic: An Intro- 
duction to the Metatheory of Standard First 
Order Logic 

The elementary statement and predicate 
calculus, formal systems; applications of logic 
in mathematics 

MAT 391 — Mathematics for the Elementary 
School Teacher (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: MAT 101 and Admis- 
sion to Teacher Education. 

A study of the mathematics in the elemen- 
tary curriculum, with emphasis on appropriate 
methods of teaching for understanding through 
active involvement of the learner. Frequent 
use of wide range of concrete manipulatives to 
embody concepts in arithmetic of whole num- 
bers and fractions and in geometry and mea- 
surement. Directed field experience. (Credit 
will not apply toward a degree in the mathemat- 
ical sciences.) 

MAT 393— Teaching of Middle School/ 
General Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Summer (even years). Prerequisite: Ten 
quarter hours of college mathematics num- 
bered 101 or above. Present text: Sobol and 
Maletsky, Teaching Mathematics: A Source- 
book of Aids, Activities, and Strategies. 

Problems of teaching traditional topics, such 
as fractions, decimals, percentage, measure- 
ment (especially in the metric system), and 
informal geometry. Emphasis on incorporating 
drill and practice in necessary skills with fresh 
topics like probability and statistics, and with 
appropriate games and laboratory activities. 
(Credit will not apply toward a degree in the 
mathematical sciences.) 

MAT 400— Putnam Seminar (0-2-1) 

^all. Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

A variety of mathematical problems, consid- 
ered with the aim of developing problem solv- 
ing techniques. 



MAT 401-402— Advanced Calculus I, II 
(4-0-4) 

401 Fall (odd years), 40? Winter (even 

>ent 
text Goldberg, Methods ol Reel An,,,, 

The real number system, sequences, limits 
of functions, the Bolzano-Weierstrass theo- 
rem, compactness, uniform continuity, the 
derivative, the Riemann integral, Euclidean n- 
space; sequences of functions, the Weier- 
strass approximation theorem; series, elemen- 
tary functions 

MAT 406— Functions of a Complex Variable 
(5-0-5) 

Spring (even years). Prerequisites MAT 
208, 260 Present text: Churchill, Complex Var- 
iables with Applications. 

Complex numbers; elementary functions 
and transformations; the Cauchy theory; con- 
formal mapping; Riemann's mapping theorem 

MAT 416— Theory of Numbers (3-0-3) 

Fall (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 
260. Present text: Burton, Elementary Number 
Theory. 

Divisibility and congruence; quadratic reci- 
procity; diophantine equations; number-theo- 
retic functions and their applications; selected 
advanced topics from algebraic and analytic 
number theory. 

MAT 436— Topology (3-0-3) 

Spring (even years). Prerequisite: MAT 401 . 
Present text: Dugundji, Topology. 

Topological spaces and homeomorphisms; 
separability; compactness; connectedness; 
completeness; metrizability; introduction to 
homotopy theory. 

MAT 470— History of Mathematics (3-0-3) 

Fall (even years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 
and six quarter hours of mathematics courses 
with course numbers greater than 309. Pres- 
ent text: Eves, An Introduction to the History of 
Mathematics. 

A survey of the development of mathemat- 
ics from its empirical beginnings to its present 
state. 

MAT 490— Special Topics ((1-5)-0-(1-5)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequi- 
sites: Consent of the instructor and permission 
of the department head. 

Individual readings and research under the 
direction of a member of the mathematics 
faculty. 






96 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MAT 496-497-498— Internship in 
Mathematics ((0-1)-(12-15)-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of the department head. 

Experience, in a variety of mathematical 
applications suited to the educational and pro- 
fessional aspirations of the student, under the 
direction of the faculty and appropriate off- 
campus supervisory personnel. (Open to tran- 
sient students only with permission of the 
Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and that of the 
appropriate official of the college from which 
the student comes). 



Computer Science Offerings 

CS 11 0— Introduction to Computing (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 101. Present text: Bent & Sethares, 
BASIC. 

BASIC programming and program struc- 
ture; elementary logic and Boolean algebra; 
algorithms; flow charts; debugging; computer 
solutions of numeric and non-numeric prob- 
lems, characteristics and applications of com- 
puters in modern society. 

CS 115— Introduction to Information 
Processing (5-0-5) 

Winter. Present text: Shelly and Cashman, 
Introduction to Computers and Data Proces- 
sing. 

This course is designed forthe non-computer 
science major and emphasizes the basic prin- 
ciples f electronic data processing. Attention is 
given to both hardware and software. The 
CPU, storage, I/O operations and devices, 
data and data-recording media, program devel- 
opment, programming techniques and lan- 
guages, and systems concepts are introduced. 
May not be applied as part of a language 
sequence. 

CS 136— RPG Programming (3-4-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: CS 1 1 or 1 46. Pres- 
ent text: Shelly and Cashman, Computer Pro- 
gramming RPG II. 

Introduction to the language and program- 
ming applications for small computer systems 
using RPG. 

CS 146— Fortran Programming (4-3-5) 

Winter, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 
Present text: Merchant, Fortran 77. 

Algorithmic processes of computer problem 
solving; elementary logic and Boolean alge- 
bra; FORTRAN programming language: syn- 
tax, arrays, input/output, subroutines, functions. 



CS 225— Statistical Programming for 
the Social Sciences (3-4-5) 

Winter (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 220 
and CS 1 1 or 1 46. Present text: Klecka, Nie, 
Hull, SPSS Primer. 

Uses of computers in statistical analysis, 
including the study of statistical methods, the 
programming of statistical analyses, and data 
analysis using packaged systems. 

CS 231— Programming Principles with 
COBOL (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
CS 110 or 146. Present text: Abel, COBOL 
Programming a Structured Approach. 

The COBOL programming language: basic 
syntax, input/output, debugging, table-han- 
dling, sorting, searching, sequential file manipu- 
lation, structured programming for COBOL; 
JCL for COBOL programs. 

CS 240— Programming Principles with 
PASCAL (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Summer. Prerequisites: MAT 
103 and CS 110 or 146. Present text: Zaks, 
Introduction to PASCAL Including UCSD PAS- 
CAL. 

Structured programming; the PASCAL pro- 
gramming language: basic syntax, input/out- 
put, debugging, functions and procedures, 
data types. 

CS 260— Discrete Structures (5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: MAT 1 03 and CS 
110 or 146. 

Elementary logic, naive set theory, relations 
and functions, Boolean algebras, ordering rela- 
tions, graph theory. 

CS 301— Computer Organization and 
Programming (4-3-5) 

Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: CS 
231 or CS 240. Present text: Kuo, Assembler 
Language for FORTRAN, COBOL, and PL/1 
Programmers. 

Introduction to systems programming via in- 
depth coverage of assembler programming; 
operating systems; addressing techniques; 
internal storage structure; machine-level repre- 
sentation of instructions and data; subrou- 
tines; I/O; linkers and loaders; macro-facilities; 
mass data storage facilities. 

CS 302— Data Structures (4-3-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: CS 240, 260, 301 . 
Present text: Tanenbaum & Augenstein, Data 
Structures using PASCAL. 

Internal representation of arrays, queues, 
trees, stacks, graphs, and lists; concepts related 
to the interaction between data structures and 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



97 



storage structures tor the generating, develop 
tng. and processing of data 

CS 305— Computer Systems (5-0-5) 

Fall. Spring Prerequisite CS 301 Present 
text Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Org 
zation 

Hardware and software components of dig- 
ital computing systems, with emphasis on sys- 
tem software and details of hardware organi- 
zation Topics include system structure, data 
representation, processors, control, storage, 
input output interrupts and microprogramming 

CS 306— Data and Programming Manage- 
ment (3-4-5) 

Fall, Spring Prerequisite: CS 231 Present 
text Brown, System 370 Job Control Language. 

Indexed sequential, direct, relative files; pro- 
grams involving file manipulations in COBOL; 
utility programs; partitioned data sets; proce- 
dure libraries; JCL required for the aforemen- 
tioned topics. 

CS 331— Systems Analysis and Design 
(3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: CS 306. Present text: 
Weinberg, Structured Analysis. 

Principles and methodology of structured 
systems analysis and design, including per- 
sonnel and machine requirements, system 
specifications, analysis and design tools and 
techniques, system life cycle management. A 
. student project which implements these tech- 
niques will be required. 

CS 334— Introduction to Software 
Engineering (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: CS 302 and CS 306. 
Present text: Gillett and Pollack, An Introduc- 

■ tion to Engineered Software. 

Principles and techniques of designing and 

' developing engineered software, including pro- 
gram structures, design specifications re- 
source limitations, reliability, correctness, de- 
bugging, testing, modular program construc- 
tion and user interfaces. A student project 
which implements these techniques will be 
required. 

CS 342— Comparative Languages (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: CS 240, 260 (CS 301 
is recommended). Present text: Organick, For- 
sythe, and Plummer, Programming Language 
Structures. 

i Comparative study of programming lan- 
guages including facilities for recursion, pro- 

i cedures, storage allocation techniques, string 

c orocessing, and passing of parameters. 

i 



CS 353 — Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Sun ,ites MAT 

207 and CS 110 or 146 P 
and DeBoor. Elementary N . 

Nun or, polynomial interpolation, 

systems of linear equations, numerical 
gration and numerical solution of differential 
equations, matrix inversion, evaluation of deter- 
minants; calculation of eigenvalues and eigen- 
vectors, boundary value problems 

CS 360— Computer Logic Design (5-0-5) 

Winter (odd years) and Spring (even years) 
Prerequisites: CS 260 and 305. Present text 
Mano, Computer Logic Design. 

Theory and design of digital logic systems at 
the gate level. A variety of techniques for the 
reduction of digital circuits will be studied. 

CS 401— Systems Programming I (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: CS 302. 305. Present text: 
Shaw. The Logical Design of Operating Sys- 
tems. 

Software requirements for support of com- 
puter systems, especially in a multiprogrammed 
environment; addressing techniques; file sys- 
tem organization and management; I/O; con- 
trol systems; spooling; interrupts; reentrant 
code; user services; executive systems. 

CS 402— Systems Programming II (3-4-5) 

Winter (even years). Prerequisite: CS 401. 
Present text: Shaw, The Logical Design of 
Operating Systems. 

Design and analysis of operating systems; 
memory management; name management; 
file systems; segmentation; paging; protection; 
resource allocation. 

CS 411— Data Communications (5-0-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: CS 305. Present text: 
Tanenbaum, Computer Networks: Toward Dis- 
tributed Processing Systems. 

Communications media; codes; data trans- 
mission; multiplexing; protocols; layered net- 
works. 

CS 431— Control and Organization of 
Information (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: CS 260, 306 (CS 302 is 
recommended). Present text: Bradley. File and 
Data Base Techniques. 

Information analysis and logical design of 
information systems and data bases; consid- 
eration of hardware, access methods, man- 
agement and control functions, communicat- 
ing with the data base, and integrated systems. 



98 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CS 445— Theory of Programming 
Languages (4-3-5) 

Spring (odd years). Prerequisites: CS 302, 
342. Present text: Aho and Ullman, Principles 
of Compiler Design. 

Study of programming language translation 
and basic compiler implementation techniques. 
Formal grammars and languages; specifica- 
tion of syntax and semantics; lexical analysis; 
parsing; semantic processing. 

CS 490— Special Topics in Computer 
Science ((0-5)-(0-15)-(1-5)) 

Summer. Prerequisites: Consent of the in- 
structor and permission of the department 
head. 

Selected topics in some area of current 
interest in computer science; possible areas 
include system simulation, graphics, and 
microcomputers. 

CS 496-497-498— Internship in Computer 
Science ((0-1)-(12-15)-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of the department head. 

Experience, in a variety of computing envi- 
ronments suited to the educational and profes- 
sional aspirations of the student, under the 
direction of a member of the faculty and 
appropriate off-campus supervisory personnel. 



Psychology 



Faculty 

To Be Appointed, Department Head 

Douglass, Keith 

Lane, Joseph 

Martin, Grace 

Palefsky, Elliot 

Patchak, Jane Anne 

Worthington, C. Stewart 



Students are adivsed to complete as many 
of the general degree requirements as possi- 
ble before entering their junior year. Psychol- 
ogy majors should take PSY 1 01 and 220 before 
the end of their sophomore years. Suggested 
course distributions and annual schedules are 
available in the department office. All students 
are urged to seek advisement with regard to 
degree requirements and scheduling. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course selected from: PHI 
201,202 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 195 or 290 10 

2. One of the sequences: CHE 121, 
122,orPHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115, POS 113 15 

2. ECO 201 orSOC201 5 

Area IV '. . . . 30 

1. BIO 101, 102, MAT 220 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. PSY 101, ANT 201 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Degree Requirements 65 

1. PSY 220, 307, 308, 309, 312, 
410,411,412 40 

2. Two of the following: PSY 303, 
305,311 10 

3. Foreign language or computer 
science sequence 15 

C. Elective Courses 1 0-25 

1. An appropriate minor or select- 
ed upper division courses .. . 10-25 

D. Unspecified 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191-206 

Minor Concentrations 

The Department of Psychology offers minors 
in the following four areas: 

A. Psychology— which requires 20 credit 
hours of upper division work with grades of "C" 
or better. 

B. Mental Health— which requires PSY 201 
202,315,405,406. 

C. Organizational Psychology— which re- 
quires five of the following: PSY 202, 31 5, 320 
321,322,406. 

D. Anthropology— which requires 20 hoursi 
of upper division anthropology credits with 
grades of "C" or better. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



OFFERINGS 
Anthropology Offerings 

ANT 201— Humankind & Culture (5-0-5) 

Each quarter 

The nature, causes and prospects of being 
human A study of the biocultural nature of 
humans and the development of societies 
from the prehterate beginnings through the 
rise of complex organization. 

ANT 202— Human Evolution (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand 

Survey of physical anthropology, including 
the fossil record, living primates, the evolution 
of pre-humans and humans, their ecology and 
cultures. 

ANT/MPS 207— Introduction to 
Archeology (5-0-5) 

The introductory archaeology course con- 
sists of a history of the field, basic techniques, 
theoretical underpinnings, and examples of 
field work from all types of excavation. It cov- 
ers the range from early man to industrial and 
urban archeology in a general fashion. Analy- 
sis is introduced along with survey techniques, 
preservation, reporting and other skills. (Iden- 
tical with MPS 207.) 

ANT 305— Americans Called Indians (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ANT 201 . 

An investigation of the aboriginal cultures of 
North America from the Arctic to the Rio 
Grande. Study will include origins, distribution, 
ecology and interrelationships, past through 
present. 

ANT 310— Anthropology of Sex and 
Gender (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ANT 201 . 

An examination of the cultural determinants 
of sex roles in selected world societies, past 
and present. The foci will be three anthropolog- 
ical analyses: economics and status; art and 
ritual: the structure of women's worlds. 

ANT 400— Sorcery, Demons and 
Gods (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Anthropological analysis of religion as a 
universal category of culture. The supernatur- 
al will be considered: Mother goddesses 
myth, sorcery, shamanism, sacrifice and to- 
temism. Belief systems in their sociocultural 
contexts will be emphasized. 



ANT/MPS 401 — Fleldwork In Historical 
Archaeology (0-10-5) 

Sun MPS 207 or pel 

sion of instructor or director 

An introduction to and first application of 
archaeological methods to a specific field pro- 
ject Excavation techniques, surveying and 
map making, data collecting and recording, 
archaeological photography, the identification 
and analysis of artifacts, and the interpretation 
or archaeological data will be presented in 
field and laboratory work as well as in lectures 
and readings. (Identical with MPS 401 ) (Under 
certain circumstances this course may be 
substituted in the Preservation Studies minor 
for MPS 498). Course may be repeated for 
credit. 

ANT/MPS 402— Practicum in 
Archaeological Analysis (2-6-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or 
director. 

The application of archaeological interpret- 
ative techniques to a specific site or analytical 
problem. Individual research projects in the 
interpretation of archaeological data and the 
conservation of artifactual finds with special 
attention to the care and storage of collec- 
tions, display in the museum setting, and the 
presentation of archaeologically-denved infor- 
mation. (Identical with MPS 402.) 

ANT/MPS 403— American Material Culture 
(4-2-5) 

An introduction to the study of the non- 
literary remains of our society, past and pres- 
ent. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceram- 
ics, mortuary art, community and settlement 
patterns, diet, dress and disease are among 
the topics that will be discussed. 



Psychology Offerings 

PSY 101— General Psychology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, 
and methods of the science of behavior. Dis- 
cussion and demonstrations assist in survey- 
ing all the areas of psychology. Psychology 
101 is prerequisite to all other courses in the 
department. 

PSY 110— Introduction to Clinical 
Psychology (5-0-5) 

A survey of behavioral problems, treatment 
modes, and theories. 



100 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PSY 201— Survey of Clinical Methods 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A survey of personality theories and the 
behavior changing techniques arising from 
them. The emphasis will be on learning theory 
and environmental influences. 

PSY 202— Psychological Testing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

Objective measurement and accurate re- 
cording of findings will be emphasized. The 
use of interview data, case studies, as well as 
written tests, will be introduced. 

PSY 203-4— Independent Practicum 
(V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: 25 hours of psychology. 

Students may be given academic credit for 
supervised community work which meets ap- 
propriate performance criteria. Students will 
need prior departmental faculty approval of 
the work setting, goals, and supervision. A 
faculty advisor will be assigned to support and 
evaluate the student's work. 

PSY 220— Introduction to Psychological 
Research (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An introduction to scientific methodology 
and its application to behavior analysis. Var- 
ious techniques of data collection and the sta- 
tistical analysis of such data are emphasized. 

PSY 301— Educational Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 1 01 . Offered each quarter. 

The application of behavioral science tothe 
problem of learning in the classroom. Primarily 
for teacher preparation. 

PSY 303— Social Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

The study of the behavior of others as 
determinants of the behavior of the individual. 
The cultural milieu and group pressures will be 
examined in terms of their effect on behavior. 

PSY 305— Developmental Psychology 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the origin and development of 
psychological processes. The effects of matu- 
rational, learning, and social variables on hu- 
man behavior are examined. 

PSY 307— Perception (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 220. 

An experimental-theoretical approach to 
the nature of perception. Special attention is 
given to the psychological method. 



PSY 308— Learning and Motivation (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101,220. 

An examination of the methodology and 
theory associated with the various forms of 
learning and their motivational concomitants. 

PSY 309— Physiological Psychology (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, BIO 101-102. 

Introduction to the biological bases of be- 
havior. The structure and function of the ner- 
vous system are studied and related to the 
behavior of humans and other organisms. 

PSY 311— Theories of Personality (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of selected personality theories with 
emphasis on normal behavior. Attention will be 
given to both experimental and clinical data. 
The determinants of personality structure and 
the development of personality will be exam- 
ined from divergent points of view. 

PSY 312— Measurement (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 220. 

An examination of the theory of measure- 
ment. Reliability and validity techniques are 
discussed, using current psychological tests 
as examples. 

PSY 315— Psychology of Conflict and 
Stress (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

Concerned with the problems of stress, 
alcohol and drug problems, life planning, retire- 
ment, illness and death, and conflict resolution. 

PSY 319— Animal Behavior (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the adaptations and behaviors 
with which living organisms cope effectively 
with their environment. The laboratory will pro- 
vide an introduction to animal care, training, 
and experimentation. 

PSY 320— Organizational Psychology 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

Applications of psychology to organizational 
management including systems analysis, labor 
relations, decision making, personnel selec- 
tion and development and organizational com- 
munication. 

PSY 321— Psychology of Work Behavior 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 320. 

A psychological analysis of incentive sys- 
tems, work environments, training strategies, 
program development and evaluation. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



101 



PSY 322— Psychology of Organizational 
Development (5-0-5) 
;ite PSY 320 

Psychological principles applied to Intel 
personal and intergroup relations, organiza- 
tional leadership, management of organiza- 
tional change relating to the social environment 
and communication systems. 

PSY 405— Behavior Disorders (5-0-5) 
requisite PSY 101 

A study of the scientific and cultural bases of 
various conceptions of undesirable behavior. 
Application of principles derived from basic 
research will be emphasized. 

PSY 406— Behavior Modification (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite PSY 101 

A study of proven methods of generating 
behavioral change, their empirical foundations, 
and their applications in clinical, educational 
and social settings. 

PSY 410— History and Systems of 
Psychology (5-0-5) 

Open only to psychology majors or by invita- 
tion of the professor. 

A study of the basic ideas in psychology 

from early animism to modern behavioristics. 

Special attention is given to the philosophical 

basis at various times in the history of psychcl- 

' ogy. 

PSY 411— Senior Seminar (5-0-5) 

Open only to senior psychology majors or by 
invitation of the professor. 

A reading and discussion group which will 
concentrate on selected contemporary issues 
in psychology. Specific content will vary from 
I year to year. 

PSY 412— Senior Project (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Senior status. 

Each student will work with a faculty member 

qualified in the student's area of interest. Work 

is to begin in the first quarter of the senior year 

(register for the quarter of expected comple- 

i.tion). The student will produce a scholarly 

f paper which must be acceptable to the depart- 

. mental faculty. 



School of Education 

Nash, Charles, Dean 



s Goals and Objectives 

The School of Education considers its major 
-unction to be the preparation of competent 



teachers who are committed to excellence in 
education Its programs are designed to meet 
the i i and future education pro- 

onals by ; m with special . 

Skills, knowledge 01 theory ar : IS Of 

teaching, practical laboratory ,es, 

and the opportunity to i ..ays 

of meeting the needs of every sto 

The School also endeavors to maintain the 
highest standards of professional excellence 
among its faculty by encouraging and provid- 
ing opportunities for enrichment such as par- 
ticipation in educational seminars, conferen- 
ces, workshops, and post graduate study 
Organization and Degrees 

The School of Education consists of three 
departments: Elementary Education, Physical 
Education and Athletics, Secondary and Spe- 
cial Education. The School of Education was 
created by the Board of Regents in 1 979, and 
offers a variety of programs, including all of the 
majors and degrees in teacher education for- 
merly offered by Savannah State College and 
Armstrong State College. 

Armstrong State College is authorized by 
the Board of Regents of the University System 
to offer the following baccalaureate degree 
programs in teacher education: 

Bachelor of Arts (with teacher certification) 
with majors in: 

English 

History 

Political Science 

Bachelor of Music Education 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors 

in: 

Early Elementary Education 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

Middle School Education 

Speech Correction 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors 
in Secondary Education in the teaching fields of: 

Art Education 

Biology Education 

Business Education (Bookkeeping and 
Business Management) 

Business Education (Comprehensive) 

Business Education (Data Processing and 
Accounting) 

Chemistry Education 

English Education 

General Science Education 

Industrial Arts Education 

Mathematics Education 

Music Education 

Physics Education 



102 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Social Science Education (Broad Fields- 
History) 

Social Science Education (Broad Fields- 
Political Science) 

Social Science Education (History) 

Social Science Education (Political Sci- 
ence) 

Trade and Industrial Education 

Bachelor of Science (with teacher certifica- 
tion) with majors in: 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Mathematical Sciences 

Program of Study (with MS-4 teacher certifica- 
tion) in 

Library Media 

Additional degree programs, those at the 
masters level, are delineated in the graduate 
section of this catalog. 

All Teacher Education programs are ap- 
proved by the Georgia State Department of 
Education. Upon verification by the College 
that a student has successfully completed an 
approved program, the student applies to the 
State Department of Education for the appro- 
priate teaching certificate. 

Armstrong State College has programs which 
are accredited by the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Cooperative Programs 

Savannah State College cooperates with 
Armstrong State College in offering majors in: 
(1) Industrial Arts Education, (2) Trade and 
Industrial Education, and (3) Business Educa- 
tion. Coursework in the major field of study for 
each of these programs is offered by Savan- 
nah State. Students interested in these pro- 
grams should contact the head of the Depart- 
ment of Secondary Education at Armstrong 
State College. 

General Requirements: Teacher Education 
Programs 

These requirements apply to all students in 
Teacher Education programs at Armstrong 
State College. 

Academic Advisement 

A student who desires to become an elemen- 
tary or secondary school teacher should apply 
during the first quarter of residence to the 
School of Education for academic advise- 
ment. The student should follow without devia- 
tion the approved program. Upon admission to 
Teacher Education, students will be assigned 
advisors as follows: 



1. Early Elementary and Middle School edu- 
cation majors are assigned an advisor in 
the Department of Early Education who will 
assist the student in planning the total pro- 
gram of studies. 

2. Students pursuing secondary or all level 
programs will be assigned an advisor in the 
Department of Secondary Education. Each 
student must have a secondary teaching 
program approved in advance. Special forms 
for this purpose are to be filed with the 
advisor and a copy given to the student. 

Admission to Teacher Education 

A student pursuing a program leading toward 
certification must apply for admission to the 
Teacher Education program. This application 
will normally be filed during the second quarter 
of the sophomore year or, for transfer students, 
in the first quarter of the junior year. Applica- 
tion forms may be secured from the office of 
the Dean of the School of Education. The fol- 
lowing criteria are used in admitting applicants 
to teacher education: 

1 . Completion of at least 60 quarter hours of 
college credit with a minimum 2.500 (un- 
rounded) GPA. 

2. Completion of EDN 200 and ENG 101,1 02, 
and 201 , or their equivalents, with a "C" or 
better in each course. 

3. Competence in oral and written expression. 

4. Indication of desirable attitude, character, 
and teaching potential. 

5. Statement of good health signed by a 
licensed physician. 

6. Satisfactory completion of the Regents Exam- 
ination. Students already holding a bacca- 
laureate degree from an accredited institu- 
tion are exempted from the Regents Exami- 
nation. However, applicants seeking certifi- 
cation must satisfy requirements of the 
area in which they will be certified. 

7. Submission of four letters of recommenda- 
tion; letters may be secured from the col- 
leges or universities in whichthe applicants 
were previously enrolled. 

8. Submission of an up-to-date copy of the 
Program of Study planning sheet. 

A student who does not meet requirements 
may seek to be admitted on the basis of at 
least 75 quarter hours of credit specifically 
included in the student's program-of-study 
and with a GPA of at least 2.75 on that work. 

Recommendation for Certificate 

To be recommended for a teaching certifi- 
cate, a student must complete the degree 
requirements for an approved teacher certifi- 



EDUCATION 



103 



cation program of Armstrong State College 
and must complete at Armstrong State Col- 
lege a majority of the courses in the following 
areas the professional sequence, the teach- 
ing field, and the related field 

Liability Insurance Requirement 

All students who participate in courses for 
which field experiences (i.e., laboratory, prac- 
ticum) are required must provide evidence of 
liability insurance (i.e., SGAE membership) or 
must sign a waiver of insurance coverage. 
Students should consult advisors regarding 
this requirement 

September Practicum 

The purpose of the September Practicum is 
to provide an opportunity for future teachers 
(1 ) to learn what teachers do at the beginning 
of a new school term, (2) to participate in expe- 
riences that will assist the prospective teacher 
with future decisions concerning teaching as a 
career, and (3) to become acquainted with the 
organization and curriculum of a particular 
school. 

The September Practicum occurs during 
the first two weeks of the public school term 
(usually in late August and early September) 
and should be scheduled during the student's 
junior or senior year. No credit is given for the 
September Practicum. but it is a requirement in 
all of the teaching fields in the Armstrong State 
College Teacher Education Program. 

Application for' the September Practicum 
should be made during the first week of the 
Spring Quarter for a September Practicum in 
the forthcoming September. The student 
should contact the Director of Professional 
Laboratory Experiences. 

Student Teaching 

Student teaching, the culminating activity of 
the professional sequence, is provided in 
selected off-campus school centers. The full 
quarter of student teaching is arranged coop- 
eratively by the college, the participating 
schools, and supervising teachers. Completed 
applications for admission to student teaching 
must be submitted to the Director of Profes- 
sional Laboratory Experiences during the first 
week of the quarter preceding student teach- 
ing While student teaching, the student is 
required to adhere to established policies and 
procedures of the cooperating school system 
in addition to those policies and procedures 
established by the college and the School of 
Education. 

A student is admitted to student teaching at 



the time assignment is made While student 
•rences and other personal circumstances 
are considered, the School of Education 
serves the right to exercise its discretion in 
placement The student will receive a letter of 
assignment Orientation to student teaching 
will be held during the first several days of the 
quarter in which student teaching is sched- 
uled. The following requirements must be 
met before a student can enroll in student 
teaching: 
1 Be admitted to the Teacher Education 

Program 
2. Have at least senior status. 

3 Completion of all teaching field courses 

4 Have a 2.500 average on all courses at- 
tempted, and "C" or better in all courses 
acceptable toward the teaching field, pro- 
fessional sequence, concentration, and re- 
lated electives. 

5. Have satisfactorily completed the Media 
Competency Examination, September Prac- 
ticum, and the Regents Examination. 

6. Be recommended by two members of the 
appropriate departmental faculty, one of 
whom must be the student's advisor, and 
two faculty members outside the School of 
Education. 

7. Be approved by their respective depart- 
ments and the Dean of the School of 
Education. 

A student will not be permitted to take addi- 
tional courses during student teaching. Stu- 
dent teachers are not permitted to teach in a 
school in which their children are enrolled. 

NTE Requirement 

All undergraduate students completing teach- 
er education programs are required to take the 
Test of Professional Knowledge of the Core 
Battery of the National Teacher Examinations 
Program. Students must submit the score to 
the School of Education beforethe college can 
verify that an approved program has been 
completed additional information about this 
test can be secured from the departmental 
offices. 

Program Completion 

A student must complete the college's ap- 
proved program for certification within the four 
years following admission to the Teacher 
Education program. In the event that the stu- 
dent does not complete the program in four 
years, the individual must meet the require- 
ments of the program in effect at that time. 



104 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Elementary Education 

Faculty 

Ward, Paul, Department Head 
Agyekum, Stephen 
Battiste, Bettye Ann 
Blalock, Virginia 
Cochran, John 
Lawson, Cornelia 
Stephens, Jacquelyn 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN EARLY ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101. 102, 201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 

220 or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN200, 202 10 

2. DRS228, PSY 101 10 

3. HIS 251 or 252 and GEO 211 
or212 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B Specialized Courses 48 

1. ART 320; MAT 391; MUS 318, 
319 15 

2. PE320 3 

3. EDN 324, 336, 342, 422, 424, 
434 30 

C Professional Sequence 35 

1 EDU 310, EDN 304,436, 
471,472,473 30 

2 PSY 301 5 

D. Electives 12-15 

E Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191-194 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course from. ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1 . MAT 1 01 and 1 03 or 1 95 or 220 

or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. GEO 211 or 212 and HIS 251 

or 252 10 

2. DRS 228, PSY 1 01 , EDN 200 .. . 15 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108; 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Concentration I Courses 20 

Language arts, mathematics, 
science, or social sciences .... 20 

C. Concentration II Courses 20 

Health and physical education, 
language arts, mathematics, 
music, science, social 
sciences, or art 20 

D. Specialized Courses 30 

1 . EDN 336, 342, 422, 428, 434 ... 25 

2. MAT 391 5 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDN 304, 310, 438,471,472, 

473 30 

2. PSY 301 5 

F. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191-196 

OFFERINGS 

SPECIAL NOTES: 

1 . Liability insurance or waiver is required for 
all courses with field experiences. Please 
consult course outline or professor regard- 
ing this requirement. 

2. Most of thefollowingEDN courses are pro- 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



105 



vided primarily — but not exclusive!, 
the Department of Elementary Education 
Generally. EDN and graduate level EEE 
courses are taught through the Department 
of Elementary Education EDU. EXC. LM. 
and LS courses are taught through the 
Department of Secondary Education 

EDN Offerings 

EDN 200— Orientation to Teaching (5-0-5) 

The study of the status of education and of 
teaching as a profession The student 
engages in directed self-study and plans for 
the achievement of his professional goals. 

EDN 202— Health and the Young Child 
(5-0-5) 

Study of factors impacting upon physical 
and social emotional health of young children, 
including food and nutrition, safety, disease, 
trauma. 

EDN 235— Music and Art 
Experiences in (ECE) (5-0-5) 

The fundamentals of music and art. The stu- 
dents will design materials and demonstrate 
strategies for guiding children's music and art 
experiences. 

EDN 302— Child Growth and Development 
in the Middle School Years (4-8) (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion Program. 

The study of the social, emotional, and 
developmental characteristics of the child and 
how these factors affect his/her performance 
during the middle school years. 

EDN 304— Human Growth and Learning 
(3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

Focus on total growth and development of 
individuals with emphasis upon interrelation- 
ships of the development process and 
teaching-learning. Laboratory Component in- 
cludes use of campus, school and community 
resources for observing-participating, testing 
and synthesizing course theory. 

EDN 307— Growth and Development of the 
Young Child (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

The study of inter-relatedness of the aspects 
of growth and development; physical-motor, 
social-emotional, and intellectual cognitive for 
the young child. A unification of theory and 
research utilizing directed observations and a 



study ol 

with young i hildren will be inclu li 

EDN 308-The Child and His Family (5-0-5) 
Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

The study of children including the parent- 
child, parent-teac I ps and cultu- 
al factors which affect children and their fami- 
lies. Techniques for development of parent 
involvement in the total developmental proc- 
ess. 

EDN 310— Practicum in Nursery- 
Kindergarten Education (2-8-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Provides opportunities for directed expe- 
rience with children under six. Students attend 
seminars and work in selected preschool 
programs. 

EDN 324— Literature for Children (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

A study of children's books and selections 
from books. Designed to assist future teachers 
in the selection of the best that has been writ- 
ten inthe realm of children's literature for each 
period of the child's life. 

EDN 336— Elementary School Language 
Arts (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Designed to offer the student the opportu- 
nity to explore methods, content, and materials 
used in teaching the skills of communicative 
arts to children. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 341— The Reading Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequsite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Designed to extend understandings about 
reading as a developmental, functional, and 
recreational process. Emphasis on experimen- 
tal approaches, trends, issues, media and 
research. 

EDN 342— Elementary School Social 
Studies (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Focus upon fundamental social studies 
skills and processes needed by children. 
Directed field experiences. 

EDN 343— Mathematics for Teachers 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 



106 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Recent trends in mathematics. Emphasis on 
strategies and media used to teach mathemat- 
ics in early elementary and middle schools. 

EDN 418— Literature for the Middle School 
Learner (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion 

Provides opportunity for prospective and in- 
service teachers to explore multimedia offer- 
ings of literary value and of significance to age 
level of learners found in the middle school. 
Relates literature to all areas of the middle 
school curriculum. 

EDN 422— The Teaching of Reading (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Study of the developmental reading pro- 
gram Emphasis will be placed on reading 
skills, approaches, techniques, materials and 
evaluation for classroom use. 

EDN 424— Practicum in Individual Reading 
Instruction (2-8-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 422 and Admission to 
Teacher Education. 

Designed to provide prospective teachers 
with directed practice in the teaching of read- 
ing. Special emphasis will be placed upon 
diagnosis and teaching of needed reading 
skills. Students will be required to tutor at least 
one remedial reader. 

EDN 428— Reading in the Middle School 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Primary focus upon reading as a tool for 
extending learning in the content areas of the 
middle school. 

EDN 430— Diagnosing and Prescribing 
for Learning Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 422 or 428. 

Diagnostic and prescriptive process princi- 
ples underlying assessment and correction of 
learning problems. Designedto helptheclass- 
room teacher (1 ) determine performance lev- 
els and needs of pupils and (2) provide effec- 
tive learning assistance. 

EDN 432— Methods and Materials for 
Teaching the Preschool Child (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission toTeacher Educa- 
tion and EDN 304. 

Examination of curricular needs, teaching 
resources, teaching strategies and the range 
of interpersonal relationships involved in 
teaching young children. 



EDN 434— Methods and Curriculum of 
Elementary Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Interpretation of science for elementary 
school teaching: exploration of processes for 
translating meaning into classroom practice. 
Emphasis upon inquiry, the discovery process 
and other science teaching strategies. 

EDN 436— Curriculum and Teaching 
(K-4) (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Winter (or as needed). Prerequisite: Admis- 
sion to Teacher Education. 

The study of existing administrative organi- 
zations and instructional programs, evaluation 
procedures, and experiences in curriculum 
design at the primary level. The study and 
development of teaching methods, materials, 
and equipment. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 438— Curriculum and Teaching (4-8) 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

The study of existing administrative organi- 
zations and instructional programs, evaluation 
procedures, and experiences in curriculum 
design at the middle school level. The study 
and development of teaching strategies, mate- 
rials, and equipment. Directed field experi- 
ences. 

EDN 460— Multi-Cultural Education (5-0-5) 

Designed to study the educational implica- 
tions of cultural diversity. Examination of the 
school programs designed to meet the needs 
and interests of children from different ethnic 
backgrounds. 

EDN471— Elementary Education- 
Knowledge of Content (O-V-5) 

EDN 472— Elementary Education— Instruc- 
tional Methods and Materials (O-V-5) 

EDN 473— Elementary Education— Pro- 
fessional/Interpersonal Skills (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: See "General Requirements: 
Teacher Education Programs." 

Students are placed in selected schools for 
one quarter as full-time student staff members. 
No additional credit hours may be earned 
while student teaching. Classroom experien- 
ces and other staff responsibilities are jointly 
supervised by the college staff, supervising 
teachers, and principals in the selected 
schools. Open to transient students only with 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



107 



permission of the Dean of Education at Arm 
strong and of the college from which the 
dent comes 

EDN 490— Early Childhood Synthesis 
(1-4-3) 

Prerequisite Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion 

Problem centered activities designed to 
assist the early elementary education major in 
the synthesis of curriculum experiences. 

EDN 491 — Middle School Synthesis (1-4-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion 

Problem centered activities designed to 
assist the middle school education major in 
the synthesis of curriculum experiences. 



Physical Education 

Faculty 

Sims. Roy, Department Head 

Aenchbacher, Edward 

Bryner, Renald 

Ford, Betty 

Gill, Gloria 

Knorr, Virginia 

Lanscy, Michael 

Roberts, Joseph 

Tapp. Lawrence 



During the freshman year, all students 
should take PE 1 1 7 (Basic Health) and 1 03 or 
108 (Swimming). During the sophomore year, 
students may elect any three Physical Educa- 
tion activity courses with the last two numbers 
being between 01 and 09. Students unable to 
participate in the regular program should plan 
an alternate program with the Head of the 
Department of Physical Education. 

Students enrolled in a health program may 
i substitute the PE 21 1 (First Aid) for the PE 1 1 7 
• (Basic Health) upon approval by the appro- 
priate health program department head. 

Physical Education majors are urged to 
complete their core curriculum requirements 
before entering their junior years. 

\ PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 

" BACHELOR OFSCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

WITH A MAJOR IN HEALTH, PHYSICAL 
] EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

; Hours 

\\ A. General Requirements 1 03 



Area I 20 

1 LNG 101, 102. 201 

2 ( m ART 200, . 
272. 273, ENG 222, MUS . 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1 MA r 1 01 and 220 or 290 10 

2 Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1 HIS 114, 115, POS 113 15 

2. One course from ANT 201, 

ECO 201, 202, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, DRS228. PSY 101 ... 15 

2. PE 117, 211, 216. 217, 219, 
228,229 15 

AreaV 8 

Eight hours of activity courses ... 8 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 53-54 

1. PE 103 or 108; 106 2 

2. PE 205; 207 or 316; 210; 230 ...8-9 

3. PE212 or213or214 or 215 2 

4. PE 310, 312, 315. 317, 318, 
321,330 26 

5. PE413, 420, 421 15 

C. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC310; EDU 335. 491,492, 

493 25 

2. PE443, PSY 301 10 

D. Electives 2-3 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 194 

OFFERINGS 

Physical Education Offerings 

SPECIAL NOTE: 

Either PE 103 or PE 108 is required for all 
students. Students may register for the course 
for which they feel qualified without taking a 
swimming test. The instructor of that course 
will administer the swimming test, and any stu- 
dent enrolled in the improper course will be 
required to change to the proper course. Any 
student who holds a valid senior life-saving 
certificate and/or a valid water safety instruc- 
tor's certificate and/or passes the Armstrong 
swimming test may be exempted from the 
required swimming courses. 

PE 100— Beginning Weight Training (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Emphasis on developing physical fitness 
through a variety of fundamental weight train- 



108 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ing exercises Introduction of mechanical 
principles and techniques necessary for the 
understanding of weight training programs. 
Only one of PE 1 00 or PE 204 may count as an 
activity course toward the six hours of required 
physical education. 

PE 101— Conditioning (0-2-1) 

Fall, Spring. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts, tumbling 
lifts and carries, road work, dual combatives 
and games. 

PE 102— Team Sports (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Consists of two of the following sports: bas- 
ketball, volleyball and softball. 

PE 103— Elementary Swimming (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. (PE 202 or the 
American Red Cross WSI course may be sub- 
stituted for PE 103 or 108). 

Beginning swimming strokes, skills, and 
knowledge pertaining to safety in, on, or about 
water. This course or its equivalent required of 
all students. 

PE 104— Bowling (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in bowling. Minimum of two 
games required per class period at student's 
expense. Must provide own transportation. 

PE 105— Badminton (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
Basic skills in badminton. Student must pro- 
vide own racquet. 

PE 106— Beginning Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Fall, Spring. 

Fundamentals and practice in beginning 
tumbling and gymnastic apparatus. Required 
of Physical Education majors. 

PE 107— Trampoline (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

The teaching of the proper care and use of 
the trampoline. Under strict supervision, the 
student learns to perform the following skills: 
seat drop, knee drop, front drop, pull over, cra- 
dle, turntable, swivel hips, and spotting. 

PE 108— Intermediate Swimming (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer (PE 202 or the 
American Red Cross WSI course may be sub- 
stituted for PE 103 or 108). 

Four basic strokes, skills endurance and 
knowledge pertaining to safety in, on, or about 
water. Required, if advised by Physical Educa- 
tion Department. 



PE 109— Intermediate Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 1 06 or permission of 
instructor. 

Continuation of PE 1 06 with additional prac- 
tice of tumbling and gymnastic apparatus. 

PE 115— Officiating of Football (2-2-2) 

Fall. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpreta- 
tion, and actual experience in officiating in 
class games, intramural games, approved 
community recreation games, and public 
school games. Elective credit. Students must 
have permission of the department head or 
course instructor to enroll. 

Students must provide own whistles, hats 
and transportation to any off campus assign- 
ment. 

PE 116— Officiating of Basketball (2-2-2) 

Winter. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpreta- 
tion, and actual experience in officiating in 
class games, intramural games, approved 
community recreation games, and public 
school games. Elective credit. Students must 
have permission of the department head or 
course instructor to enroll. 

Student must provide own whistle and 
transportation to any off-campus assignment. 

PE 117— Basic Health (2-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

A basic course in health education with 
emphasis on personal health. Required of 
majors. 

PE 200— Handball and Paddleball (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

Basic instruction in handball and paddleball 
activities. Required practice games and 
equipment at student's expense. 

PE 201— Elementary Tennis (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
Basic skills in tennis. Student must provide 
own racquet and one can of new tennis balls 

PE 204— Advanced Weight Training (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: PE 100 oi 
permission of instructor. 

Emphasis on continued development o 
physical fitness through a variety of advancec 
weight training exercises. Improvement o 
maximal muscular strength and endurance ir 
the main muscle groups of the body through 
progressive resistance exercises. Only one o 
PE 100 or PE 204 may count as an activity 
course toward the six hours of required physi- 
cal education. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



109 



PE 205— Folk, Square, Social Dancing 
(0-2-1) 

Fall. Winter. Spring 

Instruction and practice in all forms of folk, 
square, and social dancing Required of Phys- 
ical Education majors 

PE 206— Beginning Modern Dance (0-2-1) 

Fall 

Basic interpretative dancing 

PE 207— Swimming Methods and Tech- 
niques (0-2-1) 

Winter Prerequisite PE 108 or equivalent 
Methods and techniques of teaching begin- 
ning swimming skills Required of majors not 
completing the Water Safety Instructor's 
Course (offered by the American Red Cross). 

PE 208-Golf (0-2-1) 

Fall. Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic techniques and instruction for the 
beginning golfer. Minimum of 36 holes of golf 
must be played outside of class at student's 
expense. Must provide six shag balls for class 
and transportation. 

PE 209— Intermediate Modern Dance 
(0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 206 or permission of 
the instructor. 

A continuation of PE 206 with emphasis on 
dynamics, composition, and choreography. 

PE 210— Prevention and Treatment of 
Athletic INjuries (2-1-2) 

Spring. 

Theory and practice of caring for and pre- 
venting injuries relating to a variety of sports. 
Students required to assist in laboratory expe- 
riences with treating and preventive training 
through the athletic, intramural or physical 
education programs. Required of majors. Stu- 
dent must provide own athletic tape. 

PE 211— Safety and First Aid (3-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

The American Red Cross Standard and 
Advanced course in First Aid. 

Required of majors. Contents of personal 
first aid kit must be provided by the student. 

PE 212— Coaching Football (3-0-2) 

Fall. 

Instruction and practice infundamental skills 
and team play, coaching courses is required of 
majors. Minimum of two games must be scout- 
ed at student's expense. 

PE 213— Coaching Basketball (3-0-2) 

Winter. 

Instruction and practice infundamental skills 



and team play • ods and 

drills us- , One o' 

coaching coi. Min- 

imum ol two games be scouted at stud* 

PE 214— Coaching Baseball and Track 
(3-0-2) 

Spring 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills 
and team play emphasizing methods and drills 
used by leading coaches. One of the coaching 
courses is required of majors Minimum of two 
games must be scouted at student s expense 

PE 215— Coaching Volleyball and Soccer 
(3-0-2) 

Spring. 

Introduced to the rules and fundamentals 
skills of volleyball and soccer. Individual devel- 
opment and application of successful coach- 
ing methods. Coaching methods will include 
acquisition of sound organizational practices 
and understanding of various coaching types. 
Required of majors. 

PE 216— Basic Games (2-0-1) 

Spring. 

Designed to acquaint student with the var- 
ious categories of games, the appropriateness 
of each type of various age levels, proper pro- 
gressions, and the best ways to use games to 
teach physical skills, emotional and social 
skills, and actual sports skills. Required of 
majors. 

PE 217— Techniques of Dance (2-0-1) 

Winter. 

Overview of the art of dance and its various 
categories. Stresses similarities and differen- 
ces in form, technique and history of the ballet, 
modern dance, jazz dance, ballroom dance, 
square dance, aerobic dance and folk dance, 
with emphasis on teaching and techniques. 

PE 219— Techniques of Safety in 
Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 106. 

Course designed to give majors thorough 
understanding of the basic principles of spot- 
ting in gymnastics to assure maximum safety 
for learners as well as proper teaching pro- 
gressions and lead-up skills necessary at 
each level of learning. Required of majors. 

PE 228— Structure and Function of the 
Human Body I (3-4-5) 

Fall. 

A study of the skeletal and muscle systems 
of the human body. Credit may not be applied 



110 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



toward the core natural science requirement. 
Required of majors 

PE 229— Structure and Function of the 
Human Body II (2-2-3) 

Winter Prerequisite PE 228. 

A continuation of PE 228 with emphasis on 
certain human organ systems including the 
circulatory, respiratory, and digestive. Credit 
may not be applied toward the core natural 
science requirement. Required of majors. 

PE 230— Physiology of Exercise (3-2-4) 

Spring. Prerequisites: PE 228, 229. 

Comprehensive introduction to the neuro- 
muscular basis of exercise. Lecture and 
laboratory course directed toward understand- 
ing of the physiological basis of human physi- 
cal performance capabilities and the investi- 
gation of certain physiological responses to 
exercise. Study will include the ability to pre- 
scribe the appropriate amount and type of 
exercise for development of various compo- 
nents of physical fitness and for weight control. 
Required of majors. 

PE 310— Techniques of Sports Skills (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: PE 443 and student 
must have successfully completed an activity 
course in three of the following or have per- 
mission of the instructor: golf, tennis, badmin- 
ton, bowling, and team sports. Admission to 
Teacher Education. 

Analysis and practice in teaching sport 
skills, such as: golf, tennis, bowling, badmin- 
ton, basketball, volleyball, soccer and softball. 
Required of majors. 

PE 311— Advanced Life Saving Course in 
Swimming (1-2-2) 

Fall. Prerequisite: 500 yard continuous swim 
using four basic strokes. 

The American Red Cross Advanced Life 
Saving Course. (May be substituted for PE 1 03 
or 108). 

PE 312— Measurement and Evaluation in 
Health, Physical and Recreation Education 
(5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Lectures, laboratory and field experience in 
the development, evaluation and application 
of tests in health and physical education. 
Required of majors. 

PE 315— Skill Techniques (0-2-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: PE 310. 
Admission to Teacher Education. 

Laboratory experiences in assisting and 
teaching activity courses in the physical edu- 
cation program. Students will assist college 



faculty in planning, instructing, and evaluation 
procedures in a college physical education 
activity class. Majors only. Required of majors. 

PE 316— Water Safety Instructor (0-3-2) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Current Advanced 
Lifesaving certificate. 

Course designed to teach proper methods, 
learning sequences, and skills for the purpose 
of certifying students as American Red Cross 
Water Safety Instructors qualified to teach 
Beginning, Advanced Beginning. Intermediate 
Swimming and Advanced Lifesaving courses. 
Includes review of lifesaving skills and prac- 
tice teaching. Required of majors: PE 207 or 
316. 

PE 317— Methods and Curriculum of Health 
Education in the Elementary and Secondary 
Schools (3-0-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher 
Education. 

Selection of health content in school curric- 
ulum, preparation and presentation of health 
topics. Teaching method is emphasized and 
student participation is stressed. Required of 
majors. 

PE 318— Intramural and Recreational 
Activities (3-0-3) 

Fall. 

Organization and administration of intramu- 
ral and recreational sports activities with 
emphasis on school and community pro- 
grams. Students required to participate in field 
experiences and observations. Must supply 
their own transportation. Required of majors. 

PE 320— Health and Physical Education for 
the Elementary School Teacher (3-0-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher 
Education. 

Theory and current practice in the teaching 
of health and physical education at the ele- 
mentary school level. Designed to meet the 
requirement for elementary certification. 

PE 321— Movement Education (3-0-3) 

Spring. 

Designed to equip the student to teach ele- 
mentary physical education via the use of 
"movement education," i.e., the guided dis- 
covery method of teaching the concepts of 
Space Awareness, Body Awareness, Quality 
of Body Movement and Relationships. Required 
of majors. 

PE 330— Kinesiology (2-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: PE 228. 
Mechanical analysis and the functions of 
the body in muscular work. Movements in 



SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



111 



athletics and daily living are considered 
Required of majors 

PE 413— Special Topics in Physical 
Education (5-0-5) 

Fall Prerequisite: PE 312. 

Research methods in health and physical 
education Allows students an opportunity for 
in-depth pursuit into areas of their interests. 
Open to majors only. Required of majors. 

PE 420— Foundations of Physical Education 
(3-0-3) 

Winter 

Historical and scientific background of the 
practices in physical education. Required of 
majors 

PE 421— Organization and Administration 
of Physical Education and Athletics (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 443 and Admission 
to Teacher Education. 

Practice and policies in establishing, admin- 
istering, and evaluating physical education 
and athletic programs. Such experiences as 
curriculum planning and selection, care and 
maintenance of equipment are included in this 
course. Open to majors only. Required of 
majors. 

PE 443— Methods and Curriculum in Health, 
Physical and Recreation Education (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher 
Education. 

The study of secondary school Health, 
Physical and Recreation Education curricu- 
lum with emphasis upon materials and 
methods of teaching Health, Physical and 
Recreation Education. Directed observations. 
Open only to and required of Physical Educa- 
tion majors. 



Secondary Education 

Faculty 

Stokes, William, Department Head 

Ball, A. Patricia 

Burgess, Clifford 

Gadsden, Ida, Emerita 

Galloway, Herbert 

Newberry, Lloyd 

Robinson, Aurelia 

Sartor, Herman, Emeritus 

Stevens, Linda 

Thomas, Claudia 

White, Susan 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF ART EDUCATION 

Hours 

A General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1 ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2 One course from ART 200. 271. 
272, 273; ENG 222, MUS 200. 
PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. ART 111, 112, 201,213 20 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 58-63 

1. ART 202 5 

2. ART 271, 272, 273** 10-15 

3. ART 313, 330, 340, 350, 351, 
370 30 

4. Two courses from: ART 362, 
363, 364 10 

5. ART 400 3 

C. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310,335,491,492, 

493 25 

2. PSY 301 5 

D. Electives 0-5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 194 
**May not be duplicated in Area I 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF BIOLOGY 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 1 01 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201 5 



112 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area II 20 

1 MAT 101 and 103 or 206 or 

220 10 

2. BIO 101, 102 10 

Area III 20 

1 HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2 One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1 EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

2. CHE 1 28, BOT 203, ZOO 204 . . 15 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B Teaching Concentration 45 

1 BIO 370, 480 and BOT 410 or 
ZOO410 15 

2 BOT or ZOO courses numbered 
300+ 10 

3. CHE 129,341,342,343 20 

C. Courses Related to Concentration. . . 15 

Three of the following: AST 201, 
GEL 201, MET 201, and OCE 
301 or 430 15 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310,335,447,481,482, 

483 30 

2. PSY 301 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF BUSINESS EDU- 
CATION (BOOKKEEPING AND BUSI- 
NESS MANAGEMENT) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 1 01 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 
271,272,273; ENG 222, MUS 

200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 195 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1 HIS 114, 115, POS 113 15 

2 ECO 201 or 202 5 



Area IV 30 

1. ACC 21 1,212; MAT 220 15 

2. EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

3. One course from: ART 200, 
271,272,273; DRS 228; MUS 

200 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Secretarial Skills Courses 27 

OAD 202, 203, 300, 301, 312, 
313,425 27 

C. Business Administration Courses ... 30 

BAD 225, 317, 320, 340, 

360, 465 30 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310,335,481,482, 

483 25 

2. BE 350, PSY 301 10 

E. Electives 3 

F. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 
Special Note: ACC (Accounting), OAD 
(Office Administration), BAD (Business Admin- 
istration), and BE (Business Education) 
courses taught at SSC only. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF BUSINESS 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102.201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 195 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. ECO 201 or 202 5 

Area IV 30 

1. ACC 21 1,212; MAT 220 15 

2. EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 



SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 113 



2 Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B Secretarial Skills Courses 27 

OAD202, 203. 300. 301, 312, 

313.42b 27 

C Business Administration Courses ... 30 
BAD 225. 317. 320. 340. 360. 

465 30 

D Professional Sequence 35 

1 EDU 310,335.481,482. 

483 25 

2. BE 350. PSY301 10 

E Electives 3 

F. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 
Special Note: ACC (Accounting), OAD (Office 
Administration), BAD (Business Administra- 
tion), and BE (Business Education) courses 
taught at SSC only. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF BUSINESS EDU- 
CATION (BUSINESS DATA PROCESSING 
AND ACCOUNTING) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272. 273: ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 195 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14. 115; POS 113 15 

2. ECO 201 or 202 5 

Area IV 30 

1. ACC 21 1,212; MAT 220 15 

2. EDN200; PSY 101 10 

3. One course from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2 Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Business Data Processing and 

Accounting courses 33 

1 . BAD 201 ; OAD 202, 300 13 

2. ACC 440; CS 1 1 0, 231 .306 .... 20 



C Business Administration Courses ... 30 

14, 340. 360. 407, 

465 30 

D Professional Sequence 35 

1 EDU 31 EDU 481 

483 25 

2 BE 350. PSY 301 10 

E Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 199 
Special Note ACC (Accounting), OAD (Office 
Administration), BAD (Business Administra- 
tion), and BE (Business Education) courses 
taught at SSC only. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF CHEMISTRY 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101. 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272,273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. CHE 128, 129 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14. 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

2. BIO 101, 102; CHE 281 15 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 35 

1 . CHE 341 , 342, 343. 350, 380 ... 22 

2. CHE 491, 497 8 

3. CHE 451 or 461 or 480 5 

C. Courses Related to Concentration. . . 25 

1. PHS 211, 212, 213 or 217, 
218,219 15 

2. BOT203, MAT 206 10 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310, 335,447, 481,482, 

483 30 

2. PSY 301 5 



114 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



E Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF ENGLISH 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 

290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14. 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. DRS228, EDN200, PSY 101 ... 15 

2. Foreign language sequence 
through 103 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 50 

1 . ENG 326, 332, 344, 406 20 

2. ENG 327 or 328 5 

3. One course from: ENG 300, 302, 
304,305,306,307,320 5 

4. One course from: ENG 308, 
309,310 5 

5. One course from: ENG 325, 
410,422 5 

6. One course from: ENG 327 or 
328, 400, 401, 402, 490 or 491 
(Neither ENG 327 nor 328 may 
be duplicated to satisfy B-2 
above, although both may be 
taken) 5 

C Courses Related to Concentration. . . 10 

1. PHI 400 or approved elective 5 

2 DRS350or351 5 

D. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDU310, 335; EDN 422 15 

2. EDU 439, 481,482,483 20 

3. PSY 301 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF GENERAL SCIENCE 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 1 01 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101,102,201 15 

2. One course from: ANT 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200 ... . 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 .'.'.' 10 

2. BIO 101, 102 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. CHE 128, 129; PHY 21 1 15 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 50 

1. BOT203, PHY 21 2, CHE 341 ... 15 

2. PHY 231 or CHE 281 or 342 5 

3. OCE301 or 430 5 

4. AST 301, GEL 301, MET 301 ... 15 

5. Approved 200+ BIO, BOT, ZOO 
electives 10 

C. Courses Related to Concentration. . . 10 

MAT 206, 220 10 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310,335; PSY 301 15 

2. EDU 447, 481 , 482, 483 20 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 10 



SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



115 



2. CHE 128. 129 or PHY 211. 

212 10 

Area III 20 

1 HIS 114. 115; POS 113 15 

2 ECO 201 or 202 

Area IV 30 

1 DRS 228, EDN 200, PSY 1 01 ... 15 

2 IAE 201. 202, 203 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108. 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 45 

1 IAE 301, 302, 303.312, 401 .... 25 

2. METc212,213 10 

3. ETc 101. 102 10 

C Professional Sequence 40 

1 EDU 310,335 10 

2. PSY 301 ; EDU 481 , 482 483 ... . 20 

3. IAE 411. 412 10 

D. Approved Electives 10 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 
Special Note: IAE (Industrial Arts Education), 
METc (Mechanical Engineering Technology), 
and ETc (Engineering Technology) courses 
taught at SSC only. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF MATHEMATICS 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272. 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114. 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201. 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. MAT 206, 207, 208 15 

3. One course selected from: ART 
200. 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; 
MUS 200 5 

AreaV 6 



i PI 103 01 108 11/ 3 

2 Three activity COUT861 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B Teaching Cor n 40 

1 CS 110 5 

2 MAT 220, 260. 31 1,336 ... 

3 Two courses from MAT 316. 
416,470 6-7 

4 Two courses from. MAT 341, 
346,353 4-5 

5. Approved MAT/CS elective 4-6 

C. Professional Sequence 35 

1 EDU 310. 335. 441 15 

2 PSY 301 , EDU 481 , 482, 483 ... 20 
3. PSY 301 5 

D. Electives 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201 ,202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. MUS 111, 112, 113, 140, 236, 
281 20 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

DRS 228 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 64-65 

1. MUS 211. 212, 213, 237, 238. 
239 15 

2. MUS 240, 340 12 

3. MUS 31 2, 330, 331 11 

4. MUS 361, 371, 372, 373, 412 ... 15 



116 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



5. One of the following 

emphases: 11-12 

a. Choral-MUS217,218,353,423, 
480 12 

b. Instrumental— 

1 MUS 227, 352, 424, 481.... 9 
2. MUS417 or 418 or419 2 

c. Keyboard— MUS 227, 352 or 

353,425,426 8 

MUS 480 or 481 3 

C Professional Sequence 30 

1.1. EDU 310,335,491,492, 

493 25 

2 PSY301 5 

D Recital Requirement (one-half of a 

senior recital) _0 

Total 195-196 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF PHYSICS 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101,102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200 ... . 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. PHY211-212or217-218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN200; PSY 101 10 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

3. PHY213or219; BIO 101, 102.. 15 
AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 30 

1. AST 201 5 

2. PHY 380, 412, 417 15 

3. Two courses from: GEL 201, 
MET 201 ;OCE 301, 430 10 

C Courses Related to Concentration. . . 30 

1. CHE 128, 129,281 15 

2. MAT 206, 207 10 

3 Approved 300+ CHE elective 5 



D. Protessional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310, 335; PSY 301 15 

2. EDU 447, 481 , 482, 483 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF SOCIAL STUDIES 
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN BROAD 
FIELDS (HISTORY) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN200 5 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201, GEO 201, SOC 201 ... 5 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

4. Approved language sequence 
through 103 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252; HIS 371 or 

377 10 

2. HIS 300 5 

3. Approved Non-Western HIS 
course(s) 5-10 

4. Approved 300+ US HIS course .. 5 

5. Approved European HIS 
course(s) 5-10 

C. Courses Related to Concentration. . . 30 

1. ECO 201, 202, 363 10-15 

2. GEO 21 1.212, elective 10-15 

3. POS 306 or 307 5 

4. POS 317, 318, 416 or 417.... 5-10 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310,335,445 15 

2. PSY 301 ; EDU 481 , 482, 483 ... 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 



SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 117 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF SOCIAL STUDIES 
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN BROAD 
FIELDS (POLITICAL SCIENCE) 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1 ENG 101. 102.201 15 

2 One course from: ART 200. 271, 
272. 273; ENG 222. MUS 200; 
PHI 200.201 5 

Area II 20 

1 MAT 101.220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 

sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1 HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1 EDN200 5 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; any GEO course; 
SOC201 5 

4. Approved language sequence 
through 103 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B Teaching Concentration 30 

1 . POS 306 or 307; 346 or 349 ... . 10 

2 POS 329, 333 10 

3. One course from: POS 317, 318, 
416,417 5 

4. Approved 300+ POS course 5 

C Courses Related to Concentration. . . 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Courses from three of the 
following: 

a. GEO 21 1,21 2, elective... 10-15 

b. ECO 201. 202, 363 10-15 

c. 300+ HIS electives 10-15 

d. ANT, PSY. SOC 

electives 10-15 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310, 335,445 15 

2. PSY 301 ; EDU 481 , 482, 483 .. . 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN HISTORY 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1 ENG 101. 102.201 15 

2. One course from ART 200, 271. 
272. 273. ENG 222. MUS 200. 

PHI 200.201 5 

Area II 20 

1 MAT 101.220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 

sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN200, PSY 101 10 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

3. Approved language sequence 
through 103 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 40 

1. HIS 251, 252, 300 15 

2. Approved Non-Western HIS 
courses 10 

3. Approved 300+ US HIS 
course(s) 5-10 

4. Approved 300+ European HIS 
course(s) 5-10 

C. Courses Related to Concentration. . . 20 

1. ECO 201, GEO 211 10 

2. One course from: ANT 201; POS 
306,307.317 5 

3. Approved social science 
elective 5 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 31 0,335, 445 15 

2. PSY 301 ; EDU 481 , 482, 483 .. . 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 



118 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101,220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS113 15 

2. SOC201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN200, PSY 101 10 

2. One course from; ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

3. Approved electives 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 40 

1. POS 306, 307, 329 15 

2. POS 316 or 318; 346 or 349; 

331 or 332 15 

3. Approved 300+ POS 

electives 10 

C. Courses Related to Concentration. . . 20 

1. HIS 251, 252 10 

2. ECO 201, GEO 211 10 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EDU 310,335,445 15 

2. PSY 301 ; EDU 481 , 482, 483 ... 20 

E. Electives 5 

F. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
WITH A MAJOR IN SPEECH CORRECTION 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1 ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 

272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 



Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14, 115; POS113 15 

2. ANT 201 or ECO 201 or SOC 
201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101,202 15 

2. EXC220; HIS 251 or 252 10 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 ... . 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 50 

1. EXC225, 230, 315, 335 20 

2. EXC 410, 411, 412, 413, 415, 
420 30 

C. Courses Related to Concentration. . . 10 

PSY 305, 405 10 

D. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDN 304; PSY 301 10 

2. EDU 310,335,422,491, 
492,493 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF TRADE AND 
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200,201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 10 

2. CHE 128, 129 or PHY 211, 

212 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. ECO 201 or 202 5 

Area IV 30 

1. DRS 228, EDN 200, PSY 101 ... 15 

2. TIE 100,200,210 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



119 



B Teaching Concentration 45 

1 TIE 300, 301.303. 323 or 410 . . 20 

2 TIE 311.313. 401. 402. 403 or 
technical electives 25 

C Professional Sequence 40 

1 EDU310. 335. PSY301 15 

2. TIE 41 1 . 421 10 

3 EDU 481. 482. 483 or TIE 
431,432.433 15 

D Approved Electives 10 

E Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 
Special Note: TIE (Trade and Industrial Educa- 
tion) courses taught at SSC only. 

Library Science/Media 

The Library Science/ Media program has 
three emphases: (1) basic library skills 
courses and specialized skill courses de- 
signed to help students in specific subject 
areas develop research skills; (2) career 
courses for prospective media specialists and 
persons interested in public and special librar- 
ies, and (3) basic courses which may be 
elected by majors in other areas. 

Certification Program 

Certification in Library Media may be 
obtained by completing 40 quarter hours in 
media and related courses with grades of "C" 
or better. This program must be incorporated 
into an existing teaching major. The following 
courses are required for certification as a 
media specialist: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320, 410, 420, 

425 25 

B. EDU 340,451 10 

C. One course from: EDN 324, 41 8, 
423; ENG 331, 332 5 

Non-Certification Program 

A student may choose any field of concen- 
tration which allows a double major. The major 
in Library Media is comprised of the following: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320, 410, 420, 

425 25 

EDU 340, 451 10 

B. One course selected from: EDN 

C. 324, 418, 422, 423; EDU 423; 
ENG 331, 332; CS 110; DRS 

347 _5 

TOTAL 40 



Library Media Minor 

udent choosing to minor in Library 
Media is required to com; 'allowing 

courses with grades of C or better in each 

Hours 

A LM 300,310. 320 

B LM 410, 420, 425 1_3 

TOTAL 25 

OFFERINGS 

SPECIAL NOTES: 

1 . Liability insurance or waiver is required for 
all courses with field experiences. Please 
consult course outline or professor regard- 
ing this requirement. 

2 Most of the following EDU offerings are 
provided primarily— but not expressly- 
through the Department of Secondary 
Education. Generally, EDN and graduate 
level EEE courses are taught through the 
Department of Elementary Education and 
EDU, EXC, LM, and LS courses are taught 
through the Department of Secondary 
Education. 

EDU Offerings 

EDU 310— Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200 and PSY 301 . 

An orientation to exceptional children with 
emphasis on educational implications and 
rehabilitation requirements. Includes class- 
room discussion of and visitations to facilities 
for training. 

EDU 320— Tests and Measurements 
(5-0-5) 

A beginning course in measurement which 
covers statistical methods, research designs 
and research problems . Students are pro- 
vided experiences in the administration and 
evaluation of psychological tests. 

EDU 335— Secondary School Curriculum 
and Methods, General (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion, PSY 301. 

The study of secondary school curriculum 
and methods. Detailed study is given to tech- 
niques of systematic observation, preparation 
of behavioral objectives, analysis of critical 
incidents, production of media materials, prac- 
tices of classroom control, and examination of 
instruction models. Directed practicum. 



120 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EDU 340— Education Media (3-4-5) 

Workshop experience in the selection, utili- 
zation, evaluation, and preparation of various 
kinds of media. Emphasis is placed on utiliza- 
tion of media in teaching Includesalsoan intro- 
duction to computer applications in the 
classroom. 

EDU 350— Improving Speech (5-0-5) 

A survey of human speech development, 
deviation, underlying causes, and resultant 
handicaps. Studying standards for efficiency 
in oral communication with opportunities for 
self-help in upgrading personal performances. 
Open to all students. Especially for teaching 
majors 

EDU 410— Adolescent Psychology 
(5-0-5) 

Focus on the phenomenon of modern ado- 
lescence. Emphasis upon the intellectual, cul- 
tural and personal transitions of the adoles- 
cent period. 

EDU 423— Adolescent Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Admis- 
sion to Teacher Education/ 

EDU 439— Secondary School Curric- 
ulum and Methods, English (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: PSY 301 
and admission to Teacher Education. 

The study of secondary school English cur- 
riculum with emphasis upon materials and 
methods of teaching English. Directed observa- 
tion. 

EDU 441— Secondary School Curric- 
ulum and Methods, Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MAT 260. 

The study of secondary school mathemat- 
ics curriculum with emphasis upon materials 
and methods of teaching mathematics. 
Directed observations. 

EDU 445— Secondary School Curric- 
ulum and Methods, Social Science 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, PSY 301. 

The study of secondary school social 
science curriculum with emphasis upon mate- 
rials and methods of teaching social science. 
Directed observations. 

EDU 447— Secondary School Curric- 
ulum and Methods, Science (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Admis- 
sion to Teacher Education, PSY 301 and EDU 
335. 



The study of secondary school science cur- 
riculum with emphasis upon materials and 
methods of teaching science. Directed ob- 
servations. 

EDU 451— Teaching Media (2-6-5) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite: EDU 340 
or permission of instructor. 

Laboratory course in designing and produc- 
ing instructional media: transparencies, slides, 
tapes and other media for teaching. 

EDU 481— Secondary Education-Knowl- 
edge of Content (O-V-5) 

EDU 482— Secondary Education-Instruc- 
tional Methods and Materials (O-V-5) 

EDU 483— Secondary Education-Pro- 
fessional Interpersonal Skills (O-V-5) 

Prerequisites: See General Requirements: 
Teacher Education Program." 

Students are placed in selected schools for 
one quarter as full-time student staff members. 
No additional credit hours may be earned 
while student teaching. Classroom experien- 
ces and other staff responsibilities are jointly 
supervised by the college staff, supervising 
teachers, and principals in the selected 
schools. Open to transient students only with 
permission of the Dean of the School of Educa- 
tion at Armstrong and of the college from 
which the student comes. 

EDU 491— K-12-Knowledge of Content 
(O-V-5) 

EDU 492— K-12-lnstructional Methods 
and Materials (O-V-5) 

EDU 493— K-12-Professional Inter 
personal Skills (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: See "General Requirements: 
Teacher Education Programs." 

Students are placed in selected schools for 
one quarter as full-time student staff members. 
No additional credit hours may be earned 
while student teaching. Classroom experien- 
ces and other staff responsibilities are jointly 
supervised by the college staff, supervising 
teachers, and principals in the selected 
schools. Open to transient students only with 
permission of the Dean of theSchool of Educa- 
tion at Armstrong and of the college from 
which the student comes. 

Exceptional Children Offerings 

EXC 220— Introduction to Communica- 
tive Disorders (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the types, etiologies, and 



SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



121 



remediation sources and techniques ol var- 
ious communicative dysfunctions in children 
and adults in the areas of language, articula- 
tion, voice, and stuttering Emphasis is Of 
recognition and awareness of these disorders, 
appropriate classroom strategies, and In 
ment referral 

EXC 225 — Phonetics for Speech 
Correctionists (3-4-5) 

Deals with the use of the International Pho- 
netic Alphabet (IPA) in speech correction. IPA 
transcription of normal and defective articula- 
tion and the important characteristics of 
regional dialects are stressed 

EXC 230— Anatomy and Physiology of 
the Speech and Hearing Mechanism 
(4-2-5) 

Anatomy and physiology of the head, neck, 
and thorax from a speech and hearing stand- 
point Special emphasis is placed on func- 
tional considerations of the respiratory sys- 
tem, larynx, oral and nasal structures, and ear. 

EXC 315— Normal Speech and Lan- 
guage Development (4-2-5) 

The study of normal language development 

with emphasis on oral language. This course 

traces developmental scales of speech and 

: language growth across various age levels 

, and includes the relationship between speech 

;and language. Observations. 

EXC 335— Speech Science (4-2-5) 

Speech communication from a psychophys- 
standpomt. Study focuses on acoustics, 
physics of speech, transmission media, and 
physical analysis of speech. 

EXC 410 — Introduction to Audiology 
(3-4-5) 

An introduction to the methods of hearing 
assessment through pure tone and speech 
audiometry, with a focus on rehabilitation of 
the hearing impaired. Supervised clinical 
practice. 

EXC 411— Stuttering (4-2-5) 

: Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

• An introduction to the problem of stuttering, 
. ts possible causes and the management train- 
i» ng of cases. Supervised clinical practicum. 

:XC 412— Language Disorders 
' 4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

• An introduction to language disorders of 
children and adults. Etiologies, evaluation 

: -rocedures. and therapeutic approaches are 
tudied. Major emphasis will be given to 



delayed language sed 

al practicum 

EXC 413 — Organically Based 

Communication Problems (4-2-5) 
Prer- ssion of Instr 

Thecour s a study of the C(r 

nication problems related to disorders of voice. 
• palate, and cerebral palsy Supervised 

clinical practicum 

EXC 415— Articulation Disorders 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisite EXC 225 

A study of the etiology, rationale, evaluation, 
and methods of therapy for disorders of articu- 
lation The course includes the development 
of a therapeutic program, lesson plans, and 
supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 420— Public School 
Program Administration (2-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 
Administration and implementation of public 
school speech therapy programs including 
identification, case load selection, scheduling, 
inservice. and relationship of speech therapy 
to the total school program. Supervised clini- 
cal practicum. 

EXC 422— Manual Language for 
the Deaf (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of the practices, procedures and 
methods in teaching manual language to the 
deaf, with a review of the historical philoso- 
phies and current trends and literature. At the 
conclusion of the course the student will have 
a working ability to communicate with a man- 
ual deaf individual as well as the ability to 
teach deaf children the process of manual 
language. 

Library Media/Science Offerings 

LM 300— Introduction to Media 
Profession (2-0-2) 

An introductory course in which students 
examine the role, functions and services of 
different types of libraries and information cen- 
ters. Emphasizes the role and responsibilities 
of librarians/media specialists. Includes also 
the social role of libraries and library networks. 
The student is given an opportunity to be 
involved in public, school, and special libraries 
during field experience. 

LM 310— Reference Sources (5-0-5) 

Study of basic reference sources, including 
searching strategies. The course has two 
phases: (1) study and evaluation of major 



122 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



types of references and information sources; 
(2) study of specific sources of information in 
elementary and secondary schools as well as 
specific sources for a subject field. 

LM 320— Cataloging and 
Classification (5-0-5) 

Introduction to the basic principles of cata- 
loging and classification of multimedia mate- 
rials combined with practical experience. 
Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress 
Classification; Sears and Library of Congress 
Subject headings; purchasing of printed library 
cards, and their adaptation and arrangement 
in the card catalog. Problems peculiar to the 
media specialist are considered. Practical 
experience is also offered. 

LM 410— Media Selection (3-0-3) 

Alternates with LM 420, Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Selection of various types of media, based 
on fundamental principles and objectives. The 
course has three phases: (1 ) selection criteria, 
source list and their use in media selection, 
publishing, and order process; (2) selection 
and evaluation of media for children consider- 
ing curncular considerations and understand- 
ing of the media specialist's responsibilities 
toward guidance in media; and (3) selection 
and evaluation of media for young adults con- 
sidering curncular correlations and enrich- 
ment; recreational and developmental needs; 
young adult services and programs. Includes 
field experiences. 

LM 420— Administration of In- 
formation Centers (5-0-5) 

Alternates with LM 41 0, Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Prerequisites: LM 300, 310, 320, 410. 

Study of organization and administration of 
all types of information centers including 
administering the budget, purchase of mate- 
rials, personnel, circulation, equipment, rou- 
tines and schedules, maintenance of the col- 
lection, preventive maintenance and minor 
repairs of equipment, and relations with admin- 
istration and users will be considered. Stu- 
dents will examine the role of the media spe- 
cialist in the curriculum process and media 
center instruction and orientation. School 
library media philosophies and educational 
objectives will also be examined. Concurrent 
enrollment in Media Internship is recom- 
mended. 

LM 425— Media Internship (0-12-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: LM 300, 
31 0, 320, 41 0. with a grade of "C" or higher and 
concurrent enrollment in LM 420. 



Supervised experience in library media cen- 
ter, or other appropriate setting. Students must 
complete 1 20 clock hours of work. Offered on 
a pass/fail basis. Application for the Internship 
must be made at least one quarter in advance. 
Prerequisites: LM 300, 310, 320, 410, with a 
grade of "C" or higher and concurrent enroll- 
ment in LM 420. 



LS 110— Introduction to Library 
Research and Materials (1-0-1) 

An orientation to the Lane Library, library 
terminology, general research methods, and 
major library aids, such as the card catalog, 
classification and subject heading guides, 
general periodical and newspaper indexes, 
encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, hand- 
books and yearbooks. This is a survey course 
to acquaint the student with a library's poten- 
tial to answer his information needs as a stu- 
dent, civilian researcher, or business person. 

LS 111— Special Periodicals 
and Bibliographies (1-0-1) 

A self-instructional survey of special period- 
ical and book indexes as well as atlases, 
gazettes, biographical tools, reviews and criti- 
cisms, and national, state, local and selected 
international and foreign documents, guides 
and tools. 

LS 311— Principles of Library 
Research and Materials (1-0-1) 

A study of general research methodology 
and tools. The methodology aspect will focus 
on two main areas of concern: (1) the 
question-transfer and negotiation process, 
and (2) the ability to recognize ready refer- 
ence, bibliographic and evaluative refer- 
ence/research questions. The study of tools 
will focus on the recognition and application ol 
the proper sources for solution. A research 
project approved by the professor is requirec 
as partial requirement for completion oi 
course. 

LS 312— Information Resources 
in the Humanities (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced ref- 
erence materials and search techniques in the 
humanities. 

LS 313— Information Resources 
in the Social Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced ref- 
erence materials and search techniques in the 
social sciences. 



SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



123 



LS 314— Information Resources 
In the Sciences (1-0-1) 

study of basic and advanced ref- 
erence materials and search techniques in the 
sciences 

SSC Business Education Offerings 

ial Note The following courses are require- 
ments of varied Bachelor of Science in Educa- 
tion degree programs offered cooperatively with 
Savannah State College. The courses are 
listed in alphabetical order by course descrip- 
tion prefix The prefix codes are spelled out in 
the degree programs themselves. 

ACC 211-212— Principles of 
Accounting I and II (5-0-5) 

Fall. Winter. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or 
better in Math 101 and 220. 

An introduction to the fundamental princi- 
ples and procedures of accounting. Detailed 
study of the technique and formation of bal- 
ance sheets, income statements, ledger 
accounts, and journals. 

BAD 225— Business Communica- 
tions (3-4-5) 

Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: ENG 1 01 . 

The application of basic principles of Eng- 
lish grammar, basic report writing, and 
research techniques to presentations and writ- 
ten communications as demanded in busi- 
ness. The role of written communications in 
relation to new media enters into the consider- 
ation given to communication theory. 

BAD 314— Legal Environment of 
Business (5-0-5) 

A study of the legal environment of business 
through a review of the nature, sources, pur- 
poses, and functions of law and the interrela- 
tionship between our legal system and the 
I social, political, and economic policies of the 
J", United States as they affect business. 

BAD 340— Principles of Marketing 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 . 
The distribution of goods and services from 
f producer to consumers; market methods 
, employed in assembling, transporting, stor- 
age, sales, and risk taking; analysis of the 
commodity, brands, sales methods and man- 
agement; advertising plans and media. 

, BAD 341— Marketing-Management (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BAD 340-360. 

Management of marketing organizations, 

with emphasis on planning, organizing and 



controlling the marketing organizations, il 
nal and external communications, marketing 
management deci8ion nuking 

BAD 360— Business Organization 
and Management (5-0-5) 

Fall 

A comprehensive study of principles of bus- 
iness organization and management Empha- 
sis is placed upon reports by students in which 
they collect data and make analyses neces- 
sary for organizing a business of their own 
choosing 

BAD 407— Business Finance 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 331 

Principles, problems, and practices asso- 
ciated with the financial management of busi- 
ness institutions; nature and types of equity 
financing; major types of short-term and long- 
term debt; capitalization; financial statements, 
working capital requirements, reorganization; 
bankruptcy; methods of inter-corporate financing 

BAD 465— Business Policy (5-0-5) 

The integration of knowledge of the various 
fields of business, with emphasis on decision 
making. Case study approach. 

ECO 200— Introduction to Eco- 
nomic Principles (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A one quarter introduction to economic 
methods and problems concentrated on the 
development to the intellectual attitudes con- 
sidered vital to the individual in his roles as a 
responsible and thinking citizen. The course is 
not open to business students, nor may it be 
taken for credit by anyone who has ever 
earned credit in any previous economics prin- 
ciples course. 

ECO 231— Business and Eco- 
nomic Statistics I (5-0-5) 

Introduces students to the methods of 
scientific inquiry and statistical application. 
The essentials of vocabulary, concepts, and 
techniques, methods of collecting, analyzing, 
and treating data; measures of central ten- 
dency, correlation and deviation, graphic 
representation, sampling validity and reliabil- 
ity; time series analysis. 

IAE 201— Wood Processing I (3-7-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ENT 102. 

Care of tools and machinery, basic hand 
and machine operations, materials selection 
and finishing. 



124 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



IAE 202— Wood Processing II (3-7-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: IAE 201 . 

A study of the construction of more 
advanced projects by the use of power tools 
and machines, and woodfinishing. 

IAE 203— Industrial Arts Design (3-7-5) 

Spring. 

Opportunities are provided for the develop- 
ment of design sensitivity and an appreciation 
for the aesthetic quality of products Consider- 
ation is given also to the analytical and 
problem-solving procedures of the industrial 
designers. 

IAE 301— Architectural Drafting (3-7-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ENT 102. 
A study of house planning and the making of 
architectural working drawings. 

IAE 302— Power Mechanics (3-7-5) 

Winter. 

A study of the theory, operation and servic- 
ing of small gas, outboard, and automotive 
engines. Theoretical consideration is given to 
turbines, jet engines, turbo-jets, and rockets. 

IAE 303— Graphic Art Technology (3-7-5) 

Instruction in the printing processes and 
areas related to the process. Experiences will 
include graphic design, composition, photog- 
raphy, offset printing and the screen process. 

IAE 312— General Electricity (3-7-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MAT 108. 

The nature, forms and sources of electricity, 
conductors, insulators, electrical measure- 
ments, low voltage and residential wiring, elec- 
trical heating and lighting. 

IAE 401 —Industrial Arts Electronics (3-7-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: IAE 312. 

Electro-magnetism, relays, transformers, 
diodes, power supplies, test equipment, small 
project construction and troubleshooting. 

IAE 411— Curriculum Building and 
Shop Organization (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, PSY301. 

A study of the techniques of curriculum 
development: shop organization and manage- 
ment. 

IAE 421— Methods of Teaching Industrial 
Arts (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, PSY 301 . 

Lesson plan making, shop demonstrations, 
use of a variety of instructional media, measur- 
ing achievement, and the various methods of 
teaching industrial arts. 



MET 212— Metal Fabrication (3-7-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ENT 102. 

A study of various metal forming, joining and 
casting techniques using a variety of metals 
and processes. Study includes the care, set- 
up and operating principles of equipment. 

MET 223— Metal Machining Processes 
(3-7-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: IAE 212. 

A study of lathes, milling machines, shapers, 
drill presses, grinders, saws, and other 
machine tools. 

OAD 202-203— Intermediate and Advanced 
Typewriting (3-0-3) 

Skill development in typewriting. Business 
letter writing, forms development, intensive 
tabulation, and formal reports. Minimum pass- 
ing speeds: 40 words per minute for 202 and 
50 words per minute for 203. 

OAD 300— Office Machines (1-6-5) 

Acquaintanceship, proficiency, and expert 
levels of development on five basic classes of 
machines: adding and calculating, copy prepa- 
ration; duplication; keypunching; and transcrib- 
ing. 

OAD 301— Administrative Office Practice 
(1-2-3) 

Prerequisites: Shorthand and typing— one 
year of each. 

A course dealing with office practice, 
subject-matter, and procedures commonly 
used in business offices; laboratory in steno- 
graphic methods and office machines. 

OAD 311-312— Elementary and Inter- 
mediate Shorthand (1-4-3) 

Fall, Winter. 

Beginning a fundamental background in 
reading and writing shorthand notes. Minimum 
standard for passing at the end of each 
course, 40 and 60 words per minute, respec- 
tively, for three minutes with 95 percent 
accuracy. 

OAD 313— Advanced Shorthand (1-4-3) 

Spring. 

Continuation of 312 with added emphasis 
on dictation and transcription of simple letters 
and documents. Minimum standard for pass- 
ing at the end of the course, 80 words per 
minute with 95 percent accuracy. 

OAD 411— Dictation and Transcription 
(1-4-3) 

Development of speed and accuracy in 
transcribing shorthand notes. Gregg tests and 



HUMAN SERVICES 



125 



standards used Minimum passing standard 
for passing at the end of the course 1 00 words 
for three minutes with 95 percent accuracy 

OAD 425— Office Management (5-0-5) 

The theory and application of management 
principles of planning, organizing, controlling 
and actuating— to administrative office manage- 
ment 



TIE 100-200-210-300— Cooperative 
Industrial Work Experience (0-0-5) 

All quarters. 

Student works in industry under the supervi- 
sion of a college coordinator to gain practical 
work experience in the occupational area he 
plans to teach. If the student has prior accep- 
table work experience in his occupational 
area, credit will be granted in these courses 
proportionately. 

TIE 301— History of Vocational Education 
(5-0-5) 

A study of the development of vocational- 
industrial education in the United States, with 
emphasis on personalities and technical 
; developments that influenced its growth. 

TIE 303— Shop Management (5-0-5) 

A study of the sources of materials, means 
of purchasing, methods of inventorying; sys- 
tems of arranging, installing, maintaining, stor- 
; mg and issuing shop tools and equipment. 

TIE 311-313-401-402-403— Competency 
In Occupation (0-0-5) 

Graduates of vocational-technical schools 
land others with occupational competency in 
an appropriate trade and industrial teaching 
[field may receive credit by successfully pass- 
ling occupational competency examinations or 
[other evidences of competency. 

TIE 323— Occupational Analysis (5-0-5) 

A study of the techniques of defining, identi- 
fying, classifying, organizing and expressing 
[essential teachable elements of occupations 
[for instructional purposes. 

TIE 410— Instructional Aids (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to motivate and 

Iteach trade and industrial education teachers 

■in design, construct, and use all types of 

'[(instructional aids which will facilitate teaching 

and learning in vocational education. 

TIE 411— Industrial Education Curriculum 
(5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, PSY 301 . 
A study of course making and curriculum 



dev< with emphasis on organizing 

als for vocational-industrial 
. ation progran 

TIE 421— Methods of Teaching Industrial 
Subjects (5-0-5) 

Win!' :uisites Admission to Teacher 

Education, PSY 301 

The techniques of making lesson plans, giv- 
ing shop lectures and demonstrations, writing 
instruction sheets, using a variety of instruc- 
tional media, and measuring student achieve- 
ment in trade and industrial education 

TIE 431-432-433— Teaching Internship in 
Trade and Industrial Education (O-V-5) 

All quarters. 

A cooperative undertaking between the col- 
lege and public school system to provide col- 
lege supervision for employed permit trade 
and industrial education teachers. This expe- 
rience is for one academic term and may be 
taken in lieu of EDN 480, 481 , 482. Prerequi- 
sites: EDN 335, TIE 41 1 , 421 ; vocational teach- 
ing permit; full-time employment as a trade 
and industrial education teacher; and approval 
of teacher's employer. 



SCHOOL OF 
HUMAN SERVICES 



Repella, James, Dean 



Goals and Objectives 

The faculty of the School of Human Services 
believes that the development of the student 
as an individual is a primary objective of a 
college education. The central role and func- 
tion of the School of Human Services is to 
provide an appropriate academic, intellectual, 
and professional milieu to develop the skills 
required for a high level of professional com- 
petence. This includes the development of 
intellectual and physical competencies; per- 
sonal values and beliefs; leadership abilities; a 
sense of integrity, self-worth, and self- 
reliance; and a sense of responsibility toward 
the community and society. To achieve these 
objectives, the goals of the School are: 
To prepare graduates who possess, at the 
appropriate level, the competencies re- 
quired in their professional endeavors, 
and whose practice is compatible with the 



126 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ethics of democratic humanistic philos- 
ophy; 

To prepare an educational environment 
which will motivate the student to develop 
a life-long commitment to learning and 
service; stimulate creativity, flexibility, and 
independence of thought and judgement 
within acceptable professional and hu- 
manistic constraints; and foster apprecia- 
tion tor scholarship and critical reasoning; 

To develop the leadership abilities of stu- 
dents so they may function effectively as 
leaders both in their professions and in 
their communities; 

To anticipate and to identify problems and 
needs and to encourage change and 
open-mindedness in finding solutions 
through appropriate research; 

To develop the School as a planning and 
resource center for professional growth 
and community service; 

To complement other Schools of the Col- 
lege by providing programs of a uniquely 
professional character which enhance 
the educational opportunities of Arm- 
strong State College. 



Organization and Degrees 

The School of Human Services includes the 
Departments of Associate Degree Nursing, 
Baccalaureate Degree Nursing, Criminal Jus- 
tice, Dental Hygiene, Respiratory Therapy, 
and the degree programs in Health Science, 
Medical Record Technology, Radiologic Tech- 
nologies, and Social Work. 

The following degree programs are offered 
within the School: 
Associate in Science in 
Criminal Justice (Corrections or Law 

Enforcement Concentrations) 
Dental Hygiene 

Health Information Management 
Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies 
Respiratory Therapy 
Bachelor of Health Science 
Bachelor of Science in 
Criminal Justice 
Dental Hygiene Education 
Medical Technology 
Nursing 
Bachelor of Social Work 
Additional degree programs, those at the 
masters level, are delineated in the graduate 
section of this catalog. 



Associate Degree Nursing 

Faculty 

Welch, Claudia, Department Head 

Belin, Nancy 

Bell, Dorothy 

Dutko, Kathleen 

Hepner, Freddie 

Miller, Mary 

Pruden, Ethel 

Timberlake, Sara 

Williamson, Jane 



The Associate in Science degree program in 
Nursing provides the student with the oppor- 
tunity to obtain a general education and to 
study nursing at the college level. The program 
is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing 
and is fully accredited by the National League 
for Nursing (NLN). Graduates are eligible to 
make application to take the National Council of 
State Boards of Nursing Licensure Examina- 
tion (NCLEX-RN) for licensure to practice as 
Registered Nurses. Student nurses participate 
in nursing clinical experiences at local hospi- 
tals and other community agencies and are 
responsible for providing their own transporta- 
tion. 

Progression Requirements 

For progression through the Associate 
Degree Nursing Program, the following must 
be maintained: 

1. Natural science courses (CHE 201; ZOO 
208,209; BIO 210) 

a. A grade of D or above is required for 
CHE 201 and BIO 21 0. Only one D will 
be allowed. 

b. A grade of C or above is required for 
ZOO 208 and 209. 

c. A student may repeat only one of these 
courses. 

d. Students who must repeat more than 
one science course because of grades 
of "F" will be dismissed from the pro- 
gram with no option for readmission. 

2. Nursing courses 

a. A "C" or better in each nursing course 
that is a prerequisite for the subsequent 
nursing course. 

b. A student may repeat a given nursing 
course only one time. 

c. A student may repeat only one nursing 
course. 



ASSOCIATE NURSING 



127 



d Students who must repeat any one nurs- 
ing course more than one time will be 
dismissed from the program with no 
option for readmission 
e Students who must repeat more than 
one nursing course will be dismissed 
from the program with no option for 
readmission 
3. Grade Point Average 

The maintenance of a 2 GPA is desira- 
ble throughout the nursing program. Stu- 
dents who fall below 2 are subject to the 
academic status classification delineated in 
the Academic Regulations section of this 
catalog Students placed on academic 
warning who do not raise their GP As to the 
stipulated GPA the subsequent quarter will 
be suspended from the program until such 
time the GPA meets requirements. Courses 
used to raise the GPA must have Depart- 
ment Head and Admissions Committee 
approval. 

Insurance 

To meet contractual obligations with the 
cooperating clinical agencies, the Department 
requires students to submit a completed 
health history form and evidence of nursing 
liability and hospitalization insurance prior to 
participation in clinical practicums. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

Area I 10 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

Area II 20 

1. BIO210,CHE201 10 

2. ZOO 208, 209 10 

Area III 15 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2 POS 113 5 

3. PSY 101 5 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 117 and one activity course or 

three activity courses 3 

Elective 5 

' B. Courses in the Major Field 51 

1. NUR 100,101, 102, 103, 1 04 . . . 23 

2. NUR 201, 202, 206 28 

C. Regents' and National Standardized 

Nursing Examinations _0 

TOTAL 104 



OFFERINGS 

NUR 100 and 100-L— Fundamentals of 
Nursing (2-6-5) 

Fall Prerequisite Admission to the nursing 
program Eligibility 11 01 and MAT 101 

Pre- or corequisite NUR 104 and ZOO 208 
May be exempted by examination with credit 
awarded Students must first be admitted to 
program to sit for exemption test 

This course is designed to provide the stu- 
dent with learning opportunities for the under- 
standing of basic needs of man Emphasis is 
placed on understanding of self and the 
patient. Assessment of needs, implementation 
of fundamental skills, and evaluation of action 
are inherent throughout the course 

NUR 101 and 101-L— Fundamentals of 
Nursing (2-6-5) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: NSG 100. 
NSG 1 04, ZOO 208. Pre- or corequisite: CHE 
201 or ZOO 209 May be exempted by exami- 
nation with credit awarded. Students must first 
be admitted to program to sit for exemption 
test. 

A continuation of NSG 100. Needs of 
patients resulting from common stressors are 
emphasized. Skills of technical and interper- 
sonal intervention are applied to assist the 
patient to increase his adaptive potential. 

NUR 102— Maternal-Infant Health (2-6-5) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: NSG 100, 
NSG 104, ZOO 208. Pre- or corequisite: NSG 
101, CHE 201 or ZOO 209. 

This course uses an individualized approach 
to assist the student to utilize the nursing pro- 
cess in helping the expectant family to main- 
tain or improve their adaptation to the stress of 
a new member. Laboratory experiences are 
designed to give the student opportunity to 
develop and practice nursing skills related to 
maternal and infant health. 

NUR 103— Psychiatric-Mental Health 
Nursing (2-6-5) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: NSG 104, 
NSG 100, ZOO 208. Pre- or corequisite: PSY 
101, CHE 201, or ZOO 209. 

This course focuses on the development of 
self-awareness and on the therapeutic use of 
self in assisting man to maintain or regain men- 
tal health. The patient with problems of adapta- 
tion is considered not only as an individual but 
also as a member of a family within a 
community. 



128 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



NUR 104— Introduction to Nursing (3-0-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Permission of the Depart- 
ment. Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101. 
Pre- or corequisite: NSG 1 00. May be exemp- 
ted by examination with credit awarded. Stu- 
dents must first be admitted to program to sit 
for exemption test. 

This course introduces the student to nurs- 
ing as a profession, including history, legal 
aspects, professional organizations and cur- 
rent trends in education and practice. The 
course also includes foundational concepts 
concerning man and health within the stress- 
adaptation continuum. An integral part of the 
course is the student's development of an 
approach to learning in a guided independent 
manner. 

NUR 201 and 201-L— Nursing of Adults 
and Children I (4-8-8) 

Prerequisites: NSG 1 00, 1 01 , 1 02, 1 03, 1 04 
and ZOO 208, 209 and CHE 201 . 

NSG 201 builds upon the concepts of inter- 
action, oxygenation, inflammation and immu- 
nity and perception and coordination. Back- 
ground knowledge relating to these concepts 
is utilized and incorporated in the nursing care 
of the ill adult and child. Learning experiences 
are directed toward the care of patients with 
uncomplicated, commonly occurring stres- 
sors which exemplify these concepts. The 
learner uses the nursing process in providing 
nursing care to ill patients. 

NUR 202 and 202-L— Nursing of Adults 
and Children II (4-8-8) 

Winter. Prerequisite: NSG 201. Pre- or co- 
requisite: BIO 210. 

NUR 202 is the second of three quarters 
study of the ill adult and child. The concepts of 
cell growth and metabolism are added to the 
foundation built in NSG 201 as the student 
implements the nursing process in the care of 
patients undergoing stress in increasingly 
complex situations. 

NUR 206 and 206-L— Advanced Nursing 
(4-16-12) 

Spring. Prerequisite: NSG 202. 

NUR 206 is the third of three quarters' study 
of the physically ill patient. Emphasis is placed 
on utilization of the nursing process for adults 
and children having a multiplicity of needs. 
Five identified concepts— Leadership, Oxygen- 
ation, Perception and Coordination, Metabo- 
lism and Fluids and Electrolytes provide the 
basis for study of the critical care aspects of 
nursing. Under supervision, the student devel- 
ops beginning skill in the direction and man- 



agement of patient care. Assigned and self- 
directed learning experiences assist the 
student in making the transition from the role of 
student and that of practitioner. 



Baccalaureate Degree 
Nursing 

Faculty 

Buck, Marilyn, Department Head 

Keller, Carola 

Levett, Nettie 

Massey, Carole 

Schmitz, Catherine 

Silcox, Elaine 



Progression Requirements 

For the generic Bachelor of Science 
Program: 

1. A "C" or better must be earned in each 
science course. 

2. A student must attain a "C" or better in all 
science courses prior to matriculation into 
junior level clinical nursing courses. 

3. A "C" or better must be earned in each 
nursing course. No more than one nursing 
course may be repeated and a "C" or better 
must be earned at that time to remain in the 
program. 

4. A nursing course in which the student 
makes a "D" or "F" must be repeated at its 
next offering. The course may be taken 
concurrently with a non-sequential course. 

5. An overall grade-point average (GPA) of 
2.0 is required to remain in the nursing 
program. 

A student must matriculate each quarter, 
excluding Summer Quarter, to remain in the 
program. If, because of illness or other exten- 
uating circumstances, the student needs to 
be away from school for a quarter, the student 
must seek formal approval from the Depart- 
ment Head for such an absence. If such 
approval is not sought and granted, the stu- 
dent will be dropped from active status and 
must reapply for admission to the Nursing 
Major before continuing in the program. 

Transfer Courses 

The Department Head's approval is required 
if credit for courses taken at another institution 
is to be accepted for the Nursing degree. The 
taking of courses at another institution concur- 
rently with the taking of courses at Armstrong 
must be approved by the Vice President of the 



BACCALAUREATE NURSING 



129 



College if credit for the courses taken at 
another institution is to be accepted for the 
Nursing degree. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1 ENG 101. 102.201 15 

2 One course selected from: ART 
200. 271. 272. 273. MUS 200. 
PHI 200, 201; ENG 222 5 

Area II 20 

1 CHE 121. 122' 10 

2. MAT 101 and MAT 103 or 195 or 220 
220 or 290 10 

Area III 25 

1 HIS 114, 115 10 

2. POS 1 1 3 and HIS 251 or 252 . . . 10 

3 PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 210; BSN 230; SOC 201, 

ZOO 208, 209, 215 30 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 or 211 and 103 or 108 ... 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B Courses in the Major Field 84 

1. BSN 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 
336, 337, 338, 431, 432, 433, 
434, 435 84 

C. Courses in Allied Fields 11 

1. LS311 1 

2 Electives 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 196 
'Students who have already completed CHE 
201 with a "C" or better may challenge CHE 
121 and take CHE 122 or complete an ap- 
proved lab science sequence of Core Area II. 
Students who have already completed an 
approved Area II lab science sequence may 
take CHE 201. 

Curriculum Design 

— Freshman Year- 
Fall 

ENG 101 5 

CHE 121 5 

J MAT 101 5 

IPE117 or 211 _2 

17 

Winter 

' ENG 102 5 

' i i'CHE122 5 

L 



HIS 1 14 

PI 103 or 108 J_ 

16 

Spring 

PSY 101 5 

HIS 115 5 

ZOO 208 5 

PE J 

16 
—Sophomore Year- 
Fall 

ENG 201 5 

ZOO 209 5 

MAT Area II elective 5 

PE _± 

16 

Winter 

BIO 210 5 

Area I elective 5 

SOC 201 5 

PE _[ 

16 

Spring 

POS 113 5 

BSN 230 5 

ZOO 215 5 

LS311 _[ 

16 
Summer 
HIS 251 or 252 _5 

5 
—Junior Year- 
Fall 

BSN 331 5 

BSN 332 6 

BSN 333 _6 

17 

Winter 

BSN 334 6 

BSN 335 6 

BSN 336 _3 

15 

Spring 

BSN 337 6 

BSN 338 6 

Elective _5 

17 
—Senior Year- 
Fall 

BSN 431 10 

BSN 432 _5 

15 



130 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Winter 

BSN433 10 

Elective _5 

15 

Spring 

BSN434 12 

BSN435 _3 

15 



OFFERINGS 

BSN 230— Human Growth and Social 
Environment (5-0-5) 

On demand. Prerequisites: SOC 201 and 
PSY 101 or permission of the Department of 
Baccalaureate Nursing. 

This course is designed to examine the 
reciprocal relationships among man's physi- 
cal, psychological, emotional and social 
development. Emphasis is placed on facilitat- 
ing man's adaptation to internal and external 
stress throughout the life cycle. 

BSN 331— A Conceptual Framework for 
Professional Nursing (5-0-5) 

On demand. Prerequisites: All Freshman 
and Sophomore Pre-Nursing courses listed in 
the BSN Curriculum Design and admission to 
the Nursing Major. 

This course is designed for beginning stu- 
dents of professional nursing. The conceptual 
framework of the baccalaureate curriculum is 
examined. Major emphasis is placed on an 
introduction to the concepts of Nursing, Man 
and Health. 

BSN 332— Health Maintenance of the Well 
Individual (4-6-6) 

Fall. Prerequisites: All Freshman and Sopho- 
more Pre-Nursing courses listed in the BSN 
Curriculum Design and admission to the Nurs- 
ing Major. Pre- or corequisite: BSN 331 . 

An introduction to beginning skill in health 
assessment of the well individual. Emphasis is 
on maintenance of health and assessment of 
human needs to enhance positive adaptation. 
Guided independent learning activities to 
promote psychosocial and psychomotor skills 
are integrated throughout the course content. 
The student is required to incorporate inter- 
personal skills in the assumption of the profes- 
sional nursing role. Students begin to relate 
research findings to patient care. Learning 
experiences are provided in a variety of 
settings. 



BSN 333— Health Promotion Within the 
Expanding Family (4-6-6) 

Fall. Prerequisites: All Freshman and Sopho- 
more Pre-Nursing courses listed in the BSN 
Curriculum Design and admission to the Nurs- 
ing Major. Pre- or corequisite: BSN 332. 

This course focuses on health promotion 
and wellness within the expanding family. 
Using the developmental approach, the family 
is studied during the expectant phase, birth 
and continued growth of the family system. 
The nursing process, which incorporates 
human needs theory, is utilized to promote 
man's positive adaptation to health. Clinical 
learning experiences are provided in a variety 
of settings. 

BSN 334— Health Promotion and Restora- 
tion of Adult I (4-6-6) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BSN 331, 332 and 
333. 

This course is designed to examine the 
adult patient within a family who is experienc- 
ing simple alterations in oxygenation, fluids 
and electrolytes, perception and coordination, 
and metabolism. The nursing process is uti- 
lized as a frameworkto assess disturbances in 
human need attainment and to determine 
appropriate interventions for promoting posi- 
tive adaptation of the adult patient. Criteria for 
evaluating achievement of nursing goals is 
examined as students begin to document 
adaptive and maladaptive responses to nurs- 
ing interventions. Clinical learning experien- 
ces are provided in secondary health care 
settings. 

BSN 335— Promotion of Psycho-Social 
Adaptation (4-6-6) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BSN 331, 332 and 
333. 

This course is designed to assist students to 
promote and maintain positive adaptive 
behavior through the use of therapeutic inter- 
personal relationship. The dynamics of adap- 
tation of individuals, families and groups are 
examined. Emphasis is placed on the use of 
the nursing process to assess psycho-social 
needs, to plan, implement and evaluate nurs- 
ing care. Clinical experiences are provided in 
a variety of community settings. 

BSN 336— Leadership in Nursing Care 
Management (3-0-3) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BSN 331, 332 and 
333. 
This course introduces management and 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



131 



leadership principles and applies them to nurs- 
ing The focus of this course is on the leader- 
ship role of the professional nurse in the man- 
agement of health care. 

BSN 337— Health Promotion and Restora- 
tion of the Adult II (4-6-6) 

Spring Prerequisites BSN 334. 335 and 
336 

This course is designed to examine the 
adult patient within the family who is expe- 
riencing complex alterations in oxygenation, 
fluid and electrolytes, perception and coordi- 
nation, and metabolism The nursing process 
is utilized as a framework to identify and man- 
age complex health problems of adult patients 
Evaluation criteria are identified and utilized in 
complex situations as the student documents 
adaptive and maladaptive responses to nurs- 
ing interventions. Clinical learning experien- 
ces are provided in Secondary and Tertiary 
health care settings. 

BSN 338— Health Restoration Within the 
Expanding Family (4-6-6) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BSN 334, 335 and 
336. Pre- or corequisite: BSN 337. 

This course focuses on the adaptation of 
children and mothers in the expanding family 
to selected physiological and psychological 
stressors unique to children and child-bearing 
women. The student will continue to utilize 
theories of growth and development while 
assisting the child and family in the restoration 
of wellness. The nursing process is utilized to 
identify needs and to determine nursing goals 
to promote positive adaptation in the child and 
his family, and in the high risk mother. Clinical 
learning experiences are provided in a variety 
of settings. 

BSN 431— Health Promotion and Main- 
tenance of the Family (5-15-10) 

Fall. Prerequisites: All Junior level courses. 

This course is designed to examine the fam- 
ily as a basic unit of society. The interrelation- 
ship between the health status of the family 
and the health status of its individual members 
is explored. Emphasis is placed on use of the 
nursing process in the promotion and mainte- 
nance of family health. 

BSN 432— Nursing Research (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: All Junior level courses. 

The purpose of this course is to expand the 
student's knowledge of the scientific methods 
of inquiry. Emphasis is placed on exploring the 
research process and how it relates to nursing 
theory and practice. 



BSN 433— Health Promotion and Main- 
tenance In the Community (5-15-10) 

Winter Prerequisites BSN 431 and 432 
This course is a continuation and expansion 
of the concepts and principles introduced in 
Health Promotion and Maintenance of the 
Family The course is designed to analyz* 
community as system and as client Emphasis 
is placed on applying the nursing process to 
the community Research, epidemiology and 
screening are tools presented for community 
assessment. Adaptation, interpersonal rela- 
tionships, and human needs are incorporated 
into the nursing process to promote positive 
health within the community. 

BSN 434— Professional Nursing Practicum 
(4-24-12) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BSN 431, 432 and 
433. 

This course provides the opportunity for 
students to synthesize knowledge from the lib- 
eral arts, sciences and nursing as a basis for 
professional nursing practice. Students prac- 
tice the leadership role of the professional 
nurse in assessing, planning, implementing 
and evaluating nursing care of patients in a 
variety of clinical settings. Nursing roles in 
research and teaching are implemented as a 
part of professional nursing practice. 

BSN 435— Senior Seminar (3-0-3) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BSN 431, 432 and 
433. 

This course allows the student to evaluate 
the forces and factors which influence 
changes in professional nursing practice. Cur- 
rent professional issues and trends and the 
transition from student to graduate profes- 
sional nurse are included. 



Criminal Justice 

Faculty 

Megathlin, William, Department Head 
Magnus, Robert 
Menzel, George 
Murphy, Dennis 



Armstrong State College provides profes- 
sional education to prepare students for 
careers in many areas in the administration of 
criminal justice. A strong liberal arts emphasis 
has been developed within the criminal justice 
program, enabling the student to prepare for 



132 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



new and demanding requirements in his pro- 
fession. Specific courses in criminal justice 
are open to all students as electives. Students 
who plan to follow careers in the behavioral 
sciences, law, journalism, or education may 
find courses in the criminal justice area both 
interesting and useful. Non-majors should 
consult with their faculty advisors before elect- 
ing these courses. 

Two programs of study are available to the 
student who wishes to study in the criminal 
justice area— a two year program leading to 
the degree of Associate in Science in Criminal 
Justice with a concentration in corrections or 
in law enforcement and a four year program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Criminal Justice. Both of these programs have 
been accredited by the Academy of Criminal 
Justice Sciences. Each student should work 
closely with the assigned departmental advi- 
sor in planning a program for either of the two 
degrees. 

Objectives 

As part of the total academic community, 
the Department of Criminal Justice shares the 
general philosophy and objectives which 
appear elsewhere in this catalog. In addition, 
some specific teaching, research, service and 
faculty development objectives impact upon 
the provision of effective professionals for the 
criminal justice system. 

Teaching: The primary function of this 
department is to impart relevant knowledge for 
the student's consideration and understand- 
ing. In addition, the faculty must assist the 
student in the utilization of resources to 
acquire and apply knowledge beyond the con- 
fines of a particular course. The objectives of 
our teaching are: to prepare students for 
further education and for careers in the crimi- 
nal justice system, and to maximize the poten- 
tial of students to be positive influences in 
criminal justice and society. 

Research: Although a relatively minor 
importance at an institution such as Arm- 
strong, research has the potential to make a 
significant impact on improvement of local 
agencies in the criminal justice system. Our 
objective is to foster faculty and student 
research which may add to the field of knowl- 
edge and which may assist criminal justice 
agencies in their efforts to become more 
effective. 

Service: For a professional, career-oriented 
program such as ours, contacts with the 
community and the many criminal justice 
agencies are essential. The objectives of 



these contacts are: to improve the teaching 
component of the program, to foster coordina- 
tion and cooperation among the agencies and 
with the public; and to foster improvements in 
the criminal justice system. 

Faculty development: To the extent that our 
faculty is competent, other objectives and 
goals are possible. Our objective in faculty 
development is to seek and utilize all possible 
opportunities to develop each faculty member 
to the fullest extent of his/her capabilities. An 
effective department is a direct outgrowth of 
effective faculty members. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN 
LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 
200; PHI 200,201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science 

sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252; POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101;SOC201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

B. Areas of Concentration 40 

CS 100, 103, 210, 301, 370 and 
two CJ electives 

C. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN 
CORRECTIONS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 
200; PHI 200,201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science 

sequence 10 

5. HIS 252 or 253, POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101.SOC201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

B. Area of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 102, 103. 210, 270, 301 
and two CJ electives 

C. Regents' Examination _C 

TOTAL 93 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



133 



At least 45 hours of each of these two pro- 
grams must be completed at Armstrong 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 

Students who intend to major in Criminal 
Justice should complete Criminal Justice 1 00 
before the end of the freshman year and 
should complete all general education require- 
ments as soon as possible. 

Hours 

A General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1 ENG 101, 102.201 15 

2. ART 200. 271. 272. 273; MUS 

200; PHI 201; ENG 222 5 

Area II 20 

1 MAT 101. 103, 195, 220, or 

290 10 

2. Laboratory science 

sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115; POS 113 15 

2. SOC 20.1; PSY 101; ECO 201 

or ANT 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CJ 100, 103, 310, 270 20 

2. Two courses selected from: 
ANT 201, ECO 201, 202, DRS 
228, SOC201, PSY 101 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

Required Additional Courses 5 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Area of Concentration 30 

1. CJ 301, 303, 305, 370, 390, 

490 30 

C. Electives from Related Areas 60 

1. Sixty hours chosen from a list of 
selected electives. No more than fif- 
teen hours may be taken from any 
one department except Criminal Jus- 
tice. Six of these courses should be 
300-400 level courses 60 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 



I Minor Concentrations 

The department offers a minor in Criminal 

C Justice, requiring 25 hours with grades of "C" 

Dr better in each course. The minor includes: 

3J 1 00, CJ 21 or CJ 301 , CJ 270, CJ 303, CJ 

■305. 

I 



OFFERINGS 

CJ 100— Introduction to Criminal 
Justice (5-0-5) 

Offered each qu;r 

This survey course examines the emer- 
gence of formal institutions established within 
the American experience to deal with criminal 
behavior. The philosophical and cultural ori- 
gins of the criminal justice system and cuf 
trends in criminal justice are emphasized 

CJ 102— Introduction to Corrections (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

This course provides an overview of the 
American correctional system. 

CJ 103— Developing Interpersonal 
Communications Skills (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

The emphasis of this course will be placed 
upon the development of interpersonal com- 
munication skills, i.e., skills that can be effec- 
tively utilized on the job to improve interaction 
among employees and between employees 
and the public. 

CJ 203— Criminal Law (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

History and development of criminal law 
with definitions and general penalties. Special 
emphasis will be placed upon the Criminal 
Code of Georgia. 

CJ 204— Criminal Investigation (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Introduction to investigative methodology. 
Special techniques employed in criminal 
investigation, such as crime scene searches, 
the use of informants, and the techniques of 
surveillance will be emphasized as well as the 
presentation of police cases in court. 

CJ 210— Criminology (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

The nature and extent of crime in the United 
States; assessment and evaluation of various 
factors and influences that lead to criminal 
behavior; various measures proposed for the 
control of criminal behavior. 

CJ 250— Directed Readings in Criminal 
Justice (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A course designed to permit each student to 
pursue an approved topic through independ- 
ent study and research under the guidance 
and direction of the instructor. 

CJ 270— Judicial Process (5-0-5) 

Fall and Spring. 

Courts as political subsystems in compara- 



134 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



tive perspective. Judicial decision-making and 
the development of public policy through the 
judicial process 

CJ 301— Juvenile Delinquency (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of 
instructor. 

A survey of theories of juvenile delinquency, 
the sociological, biological, and psychological 
factors involved in juvenile delinquency and 
the modern trends in prevention and treatment. 

CJ 302— Criminalistics (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: A natural 
science laboratory sequence or consent of 
instructor. 

An introduction to the problems and tech- 
niques of scientific criminal investigation. 
Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the 
student with the role of science and technol- 
ogy in modern law enforcement. 

CJ 303— Penology (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: CJ 1 00, 1 02 or consent 
of instructor. 

This course deals with the analysis and eval- 
uation of both historical and contemporary 
correctional systems. This course will also 
deal with the development, organization, oper- 
ation and results of the different systems of 
corrections found in America. 

CJ 304— Probation and Parole (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 303 or 
consent of instructor. 

This course will deal with the development, 
organization, operation and results of systems 
of probation and parole as substitutes for 
incarceration. 

CJ 305— Law Enforcement Systems (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of 
instructor. 

An introduction to the philosophical, cultural 
and historical background of the police idea. 
The course is conceptually oriented and will 
deal with concepts such as the role of the 
police in contemporary society, the quasi- 
military organization of the police, and com- 
munity relations. 

CJ 307— Community Based Treatment 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 303 or 
consent of instructor. 

This course will investigate the different 
community based treatment programs. An 
emphasis will be placed on investigating the 
function of halfway houses and the use of 
volunteers in corrections. 



CJ 370— Criminal Procedure (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: CJ 270 or consent ol 
instructor. 

A survey of the distinctive features of, anc 
the basis for, American Criminal Law but 
tressed by an analysis of leading court deci 
sions relative to procedural rights emanatinc 
from the Bill of Rights. 

CJ 380— Law of Evidence (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 270 oi 
consent of instructor. 

An intensive analysis of the rules of evi- 
dence in criminal cases. Particular subjects 
will include burden of proof, hearsay evidence 
and the principles of exclusion and selection 

CJ 390— Research Methods in Criminal 
Justice (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: ENG 111 and 112, C. 
210 or 301, CJ 303 and 305. 

This course deals with the methods anc 
techniques of research in the behaviora 
sciences. Emphasis will be placed on learninc 
how to evaluate research. 

CJ 401— Criminal Justice Planning (5-0-5] 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 390 o 
consent of instructor. 

Origins and evolution of modern day plan 
ning. Planning as a process of criminal justice 
decision-making. 

CJ 402— Civil Liberties (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 270 o 
POS 31 7, or consent of instructor. 

Problems will be drawn from the substantive 
and procedural aspects of constitutional lav 
and explored in the context of the current fric 
tion between the values of order and individua 
liberty. 

CJ 406— Law and Society (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 270 o 
the consent of instructor. 

The study of the theory and philosophy c 
law and the relationship between law ant 
society. Current controversies such as civ 
disobedience and law and personal moralit 
will receive special attention. 

CJ 408— Human Relations (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Conser 
of instructor. 

This course will deal in the area of huma 
relations as a means of controlling and chang 
ing people. Emphasis will be placed on effec 
tive listening and effective communication. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 



135 



CJ 409— Health Problems in the 
Correctional Environment (5-0-5) 

This course will examine the impact of 
environmental aspects of prisons and jails on 
the physical and mental health of inmates The 
interactive problems of organizing for and 
delivery of Health Services and Health Educa- 
tion in the social milieu of corrections will be 
explored 

CJ 440— Seminar in Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite Open to 
seniors only or by consent of the instructor 

An intensive study of selected topics rela- 
tive to the concept of criminal justice Subject 
matter will vary annually. 

CJ 450— Field Experience I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to 
junior and senior criminal justice majors only 
and by invitation of the instructor 

The purpose of this course is to broaden the 
educational experience of students through 
appropriate observation and work assign- 
ments with criminal justice agencies. The 
course will be organized around specific prob- 
lem orientations with operational research 
connotations. Students will be expected to 
spend a minimum of five hours per week in the 
participating agency. Open to transient stu- 
dents only with permission of the Dean of 
Human Services at Armstrong State College 
and of the college from which the student 
comes 

CJ 451— Field Experience II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to 
junior and senior criminal justice majors only 
and by invitation of the instructor. 

This is a sequential course to CJ 450 which 
will permit the student to further broaden his 
perspectives. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the Dean of Human Servi- 
ces at Armstrong State College and of the 
college from which the student comes. 

CJ 452-453-454— Internship (V-V-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open 
only to upper level criminal justice majors. 

This course is designed to provide the stu- 
dent with an opportunity to apply academic 
training in the practical criminal justice setting. 
Settings will include law enforcement agen- 
cies (local, state or federal), community treat- 
ment facilities, and the courts. This course will 
be jointly supervised by college staff and law 
enforcement, correctional and court officials. 
Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Human Services of Arm- 



strong State College and of the college from 
which the student comes 

CJ 490 — Directed Research In Criminal 
Justice (5-0-5) 

od each quarter Prerequisite CJ 390 
A course designed to provide qualified stu- 
dents the opportunity to perform suitable and 
meaningful research into some area of crimi- 
nal justice under the direction of the instructor 
Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the Dean of Human Services at Arm- 
strong State College and of the college from 
which the student comes. 



Dental Hygiene 

Faculty 

Simon, Emma, Department Head 

Adams, Theresa 

Bavlnka, Patricia 

Fleming, Caroline 

Giorgio, Patricia 

Russell, Carol 

Tanenbaum, Barbara 



The student must complete a curriculum of 
58 quarter hours in academic courses and 56 
quarter hours in professional dental hygiene 
courses for the two-year program leading to 
the Associate in Science Degree in Dental 
Hygiene. Dental hygienists provide dental 
health services in private dental offices, civil 
service positions, industry, and in various public 
health fields. They practice under the supervi- 
sion of a dentist and must pass a state board 
examination for licensure. The curriculum is 
fully approved by the Commission on Accredi- 
tation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary Educa- 
tional Programs of The American Dental 
Association. 

A passing grade in all related natural 
science courses is a prerequisite to the 200 
level Dental Hygiene courses; therefore, CHE 
201 , ZOO 208-209, and BIO 21 must be satis- 
factorily completed before the student will be 
admitted into second-year status in the Dental 
Hygiene Program. 

The student must earn a "C" or better in 
each Dental Hygiene course before register- 
ing for subsequent dental hygiene courses; 
therefore, a grade of "C" or better in the pre- 
vious course(s) is a prerequisite for each den- 
tal hygiene course for which the student regis- 
ters after the first quarter of the first year. An 



136 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



overall GPA of 2.0 is required for graduation 
from the program. 

The Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene 
Education program is comprised of prepara- 
tory courses that will enable the student to be 
employed in areas such as dental hygiene and 
dental assisting instruction, dental health edu- 
cation in public school systems, and public 
health. The student will work directly with the 
dental hygiene faculty and participate in the 
student teaching practicums in various asso- 
ciate degree classes, clinics, laboratories, and 
extra-mural clinics. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN DENTAL 
HYGIENE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 38 

Area I ,15 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

2. DRS228 5 

Area III . 20 

1. PSY 101 5 

2. SOC201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. POS 113 5 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 117 or 211 2 

2. One activity course 1 

B. Courses in the Major Field 56 

1. DH111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 118, 
120, 124, 211, 212, 213, 214, 
215, 216, 217, 219, 220, 221, 
223,224,227 56 

C. Courses in Related Fields 20 

1. BIO 210 5 

2. CHE 201 5 

3. ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 114 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 71 

Area I 25 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2 DRS 228 and PHI 200 or 201 ... 10 

Area II 10 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

Area III 30 

1. PSY 101 5 

2. SOC201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 and 114, 115 ... 15 



4. POS113 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 211 ... 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 76 

1. DH111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 118, 
120, 124, 211, 212, 213, 214, 
215, 216, 217, 219, 220, 221, 
223,224,227 55 

2. DH 401, 402, 403, 404 20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 55 

1. BIO 101, 102,210 15 

2. CHE 122,201 10 

3. PSY 301, 305 10 

4. EDN200, 335 10 

5. ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 202 

OFFERINGS 

DH 111— Clinical Dental Hygiene I (2-6-4) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to introduce the 
student to the dental hygiene profession. The 
subject matter includes fundamental knowl- 
edge of clinical procedures and techniques of 
removing deposits from the teeth. Clinical 
procedures are introduced on the manikins 
and the student is required to practice these 
techniques until proficiency is achieved. 

DH 112-113— Clinical Dental Hygiene 
II and III (2-6-4) (1-9-4) 

Winter and Spring respectively. Prerequi- 
site: DH 111. 

Students perform oral prophylactic tech- 
niques on patients in the clinic under supervi- 
sion. The subject matter includes procedures 
which the hygienist will use in the performance 
of clinical duties. The student must apply 
acquired knowledge in all clinical situations. 

DH 118— Periodontics (2-0-2) 

Spring. 

This course is designed to give the student a 
basic understanding of periodontics. Empha- 
sis is placed on periodontal health and disease 
in relation to the health of thetotal patient. 
Periodontal knowledge is applied in clini- 
cal situations. 

DH 120— Dental Roentgenology (2-3-3) 

Winter. 

This course will include a series of lectures, 
demonstrations, and directed experience in 
the fundamentals of dental roentgenology. 
Intraoral techniques for the taking and pro- 
cessing of radiographs are taught and labora- 



DENTAL HYGIENE 



137 



tory time will be devoted to demonstration and 
directed experience Clinical time in subse- 
quent quarters will afford the application of the 
principles of clinical situations 

DH 123— Dental Anatomy and Oral 
Histology (3-2-3) 

Fall 

This course is designed to familiarize the 
dental hygiene student with the nomenclature, 
morphology, eruption sequence of the primary 
and secondary dentition and oral histology 
and embryology of the oral cavity. 

DH 124— Dental Materials (2-3-3) 

Spring. 

This course is designed to provide a general 
understanding of the chemical, physical and 
mechanical properties of dental materials. The 
indications and limitations of materials will be 
stressed as well as proper manipulation of 
those materials used by dental hygienists. 

DH 211-212-213— Clinical Dental Hygiene 
IV, V, VI (1-12-5) (1-12-5) (1-12-5) 

Fall, Winter and Spring respectively. Prereq- 
uisites: DH 111. 112, 113. 

These courses are a continuation of the 
preceding clinical courses. Emphasis centers 
on improved proficiency in all areas of a work- 
ing clinic. Lecture time is devoted mainly to the 
discussion of experiences encountered in clin- 
ical situations. Pertinent material related to the 
dental hygiene profession is included in these 
courses 

DH 214— Anesthesiology and 
Pharmacology (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

This course is a study of drugs and anesthet- 
ics with special consideration given to those 
used in dentistry. It isdesignedtoacquaintthe 
student with the principles of drug action in the 
human patient. 

DH 216-Dental Public Health (3-0-3) 

Winter. 

This course introduces the student to the 
various aspects of public health with reference 
:o the dental needs of the community. Special 
emphasis is given to terminology, epidemiol- 
ogy, and interpretation of data related to com- 
"nunity dental health programs. Directed field 
Bxperience is a course requirement. 

DH 219— Total Patient Care (0-3-1) 

Fall. 

This laboratory experience acquaints the 
■ student with the subject and practice of the 
'/arious dental specialties in relation to the 



total health This course is also 
designed to acquaint the student with 
expanding dental services provided I 
auxiliary personnel 

DH 220— Directed Field Experience (0-4-1) 

Winter 

The student is provided with a holistic 
approach todentistry by externing with private 
dental practitioners and public and military 
agencies 

DH 221— Scopes of Dental Hygiene 
Practice (1-0-1) 

Spring. 

This course is designed to acquaint stu- 
dents with various scopes of dental hygiene 
practice, the jurisprudence governing the 
practice of dental hygiene, and the structure 
and function of professional associations 

DH 223— Applied Nutrition (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

This course presents the biochemical 
aspects of nutrition as applied to the practice 
of dentistry. Students are instructed in diet, 
history and dietetic counseling. 

DH 224— Head and Neck Anatomy (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to familiarize the 
dental hygiene student with gross anatomical 
relationships in the head and neck. Special 
emphasis is given to the anatomy of the oral 
cavity and its clinical application. 

DH 225— Preventive Dental Health 
Education I (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

The principles of prevention of oral diseases 
are presented. Many facets of prevention are 
included with emphasis on the utilization of 
oral physiotherapy aids and on education and 
motivation of patients in proper oral hygiene. 
Knowledge from this course and preceding 
clinical courses will be utilized in a paper to be 
presented to the class and clinical faculty. 
Clinical time in subsequent quarters will afford 
the application of these principles to clinical 
situations. 

DH 226— Preventive Dental Health 
Education II (1-0-1) 

Winter. 

This course is a continuation of the preven- 
tive dentistry concepts. The student is familiar- 
ized with the practical application of modern 
methods of dental health education. Course 
content includes developing teaching mate- 
rials for dental health education, demonstra- 



138 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



tions, and presentation of materials. Directed 
field experience will be provided to allow the 
student practical application of techniques 
learned in the classroom. 

DH 227— General and Oral Pathology 
(3-0-3) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to familiarize dental 
hygiene students with the principles of general 
pathology in relation to the common diseases 
of oral regions. Emphasis is placed on clinical 
manifestations and the importance of early 
recognition of abnormal conditions. 

DH 401— Practlcum in Dental Hygiene 
Education I (3-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Admis- 
sion into the Dental Hygiene Education 
Program. 

This course is an introductory field expe- 
rience in the college dental hygiene clinic, 
community agencies, and patient care facili- 
ties with emphasis on observation, individual 
and small group teaching, and teacher aide 
work. The first professional course for majors 
in Dental Hygiene Education. 

DH 402— Practicum in Dental Hygiene 
Education II (3-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: DH 401 . 

This course is a continuation of Dental 
Hygiene 401 . Problems common to beginning 
dental hygiene teachers, practices and proce- 
dures designed to accomplish program objec- 
tives, establishment and organization of con- 
tent, methods of evaluation and supervision in 
the dental hygiene clinic are included. 

DH 403— Practicum in Dental Hygiene 
Education III (3-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: DH 402. 

This course is an advanced field experience 
designed to assist the student in the develop- 
ment of learning activities, teaching proce- 
dures, and the presentation of materials perti- 
nent to dental hygiene education. The student 
will develop and teach selected units in the 
basic dental hygiene sequence at community 
agencies, and patient care facilities. 

DH 404— Directed and Individual Study 
(3-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Corequisite: DH 403, 
Prerequisite: DH 403. 

This courses is a directed individual study in 
an area of major interest with emphasis rele- 
vant to dental hygiene and future career objec- 
tives. Scientific research and evaluation meth- 



ods wil be reviewed and used in the student's 
individual project. 



Health Information 
Management 

Faculty 

Marohn, Ann, Program Director 



The field of health information management 
is a rapidly growing profession. The program 
curriculum is designed to train selected indi- 
viduals in acquiring technical skills and knowl- 
edge to become competent health information 
management professionals. The student is 
prepared for clerical and supervisory respon- 
sibilities in the health record department of any 
hospital, clinic, nursing home, and any other 
health related institution. Employment oppor- 
tunities are also available in industrial organi- 
zations, governmental agencies, and medical 
libraries. Participating in medical research and 
offering consultation services to health facili- 
ties are other employment avenues. 

Progression Requirements 

1 . A grade of "C" or better must be earned in 
all HIM courses. A student will not be per- 
mitted to register for an HIM course if a "C" 
has not been earned on a prerequisite 
course. 

2. A student may repeat only one HIM course 
only one time. 

3. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in 
all natural science courses (ZOO 208, 209 
and CHE 201). Only one natural science 
course may be repeated only one time. 

4. Maintenance of a quarterly GPA of 2.0 or 
better is expected. A student who falls 
below this required quarterly GPA during 
any quarter will be placed on "Conditional 
Status" for one quarter, relative to the HIM 
program. 

5. A student may be granted "Conditional Sta- 
tus" for no more than two consecutive quar- 
ters and not more than three quarters total. 
If a student's quarterly GPA is not raised by 
the end of the second consecutive "Condi- 
tional Status" quarter or at the end of the 
third non-consecutive "Conditional Status" 
quarter, the student will be dismissed from 
the HIM program (dismissal from the col- 
lege is treated in the Academic Regulations 
section of this Catalog). 



HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 



139 






6 An overall GPA of 2 is required for 
graduation 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE. 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN HEALTH 
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 

Hours 

A General Requirements 33 

1 ENG 101, 102 10 

2 CHE 201 5 

3 HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. POS 113 5 

5 PE 117 and one activity course 
or three activity courses 3 

6 Approved elective 5 

B Courses Appropriate to the Field .... 15 

1 ZOO 208. 209 10 

2 CS 115 5 

C Courses in Major Field 58 

1 HIM 100. 101,202,203,204.... 21 
2. HIM 111. 112.213,214 18 

3 HIM 110,220.230,240 11 

4 HIM215.225 8 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 106 

OFFERINGS 

HIM 100— Health Occupations (2-0-2) 

Fall. Prerequisite: none. 

An introductory study of the present system 
of health care on local, state, national, and 
international levels. The changing pattern of 
health manpower needs and the emerging 
trends of the health care delivery system are 
explored. Orientation to health facilities with 
emphasis placed on the organization of a hos- 
oital and its functional units. 

HIM 101— Medical Record Science I (5-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: HIM 100. 

A general orientation to the historical back- 
ground of medicine, development of health 
:are field, the medical record field as a profes- 
sion with discussion of the organization and 
listory of the American Medical Record Asso- 
:iation. Included are definitions of and stand- 
ards for medical records, their content, format 
and evaluation with reference to accrediting 
agencies. Emphasis is also placed on number 
i and filing systems, retention, storage methods, 
and admitting procedures. 

-IIM 110— Directed Experience I (0-8-2) 

. Spring. Prerequisite: HIM 1 00 Pre- or coreq- 
Jisite: HIM 101. 

Directed experience in various affiliated 
' lealth care facilities will apply the theory of 



medical record practice by performing medi 
cal record skills Specific assignments if 
medical record d« ; .vill include record 

and loose document filing as v. ord 

controlling 

HIM 111— Medical Terminology I (5-0-5) 

Win' juisite N 

Introduction to medical terminology This 
course will cover the study of the language of 
medicine including word construction, word 
elements, definitions, and abbreviations related 
to all areas of medical science, hospital servi- 
ces, and health related fields Open to non- 
HIM students by permission 

HIM 112— Medical Terminology II (5-1-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: HIM 1 1 1 Prerequisite 
or corequisite: ZOO 208 

An advanced course in Medical terminol- 
ogy. This course will cover diseases, opera- 
tions, laboratory tests, and various aspects of 
medicine used in each of the human body 
systems. Open to non-HIM students by 
permission. 

HIM 202— Medical Record Science II 
(4-1-4) 

Fall. Prerequisites: HIM 101 and 1 1 0. 

Principles of record analysis: completion of 
medical records by all medical and other 
associated professionals. A study of the hospi- 
tal statistics and their respective reports: de- 
tee functions; reviewing the purposes and 
requirements of various national and state 
regulatory agencies; computing various hospi- 
tal statistics and preparing their respective 
reports; describing procedures and discuss- 
ing the sources and use of health information 
system; inservice education theory. 

HIM 203— Medical Record Science III 
(4-2-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: HIM 202 and 214. 

Concentration on defining the purposes of 
classification systems and nomenclatures; 
describing the various classification systems 
used; coding and retrieving diagnoses and 
procedures by ICD-9-CM utilizing the princi- 
ples of CPT, and other coding systems and 
nomenclatures; describing and using various 
indexes and registers. 

HIM 204— Medical Record Science IV 
(4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM 203 and 230. 

A survey of medical audit methodology; utili- 
zation review; implementing Problem-Oriented 
Medical Record in health care institutions; 
principles in managing medical libraries and 



140 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



cancer registry programs; and in providing 
consulting services to health care delivery 
systems. An overview of special record keep- 
ing systems: long term care facilities, ambula- 
tory care centers, psychiatric institutions, pri- 
vate physicians' offices, and health care 
centers, in industrial sites. 

HIM 213— Medical Transcription (1-4-3) 

Summer. Prerequisites: HIM 112, Typing 
proficiency. 

Medical transcribing, editing medical reports, 
and managing transcription pools are empha- 
sized. Theclinical laboratory time will be spent 
typing from cassette tapes, through which med- 
ical reports (discharge summaries, operative 
reports, history and physical examination, 
consultation reports) have been dictated by 
physicians. 

HIM 214— Medical Science (4-2-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: HIM 1 1 2, ZOO 209. 

Medical Science for the health information 
management student serves as an essential 
connecting link between the basic sciences of 
anatomy and physiology of the human body 
and the medical and surgical repair of a dis- 
eased host. Dysfunctions of normal physiol- 
ogy and the processes that bring about these 
disruptions will be considered. The manner in 
which these disruptions manifest themselves 
as signs, symptoms, physical findings, and 
laboratory results will be discussed. 

HIM 21 5— Legal Aspects of Medical Records 
(3-0-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: HIM 202. 

An introduction to the study of the principles 
of law (federal, state, local) and their applica- 
tion to the health field with particularemphasis 
in medical record practice; the importance of 
the medical record as a legal document; the 
effect of confidential communication laws on 
the release of information from the medical 
record; legal authorizations, consents. 

HIM 220— Directed Experience II (0-8-2) 

Fall. Prerequisites: HIM 101 and 110. Pre- 
or corequisite: HIM 202. 

Supervised learning experience at various 
health care centers. Specific assignments in 
medical record departments are record 
assembly and analysis, assisting in medical 
staff and administrative committee functions, 
and medical transcription. 

HIM 225— Organization and Administration 
I (4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM 202, 203. 

A survey of the management principles 



related to office management in a medical 
record department. Planning the work of an 
office with discussion and application to sys- 
tems, procedures, methods, and organiza- 
tional charts. Attention is given to planning and 
organizing office space, equipment, and sup- 
plies. Also included in this course are units in 
communication skills and techniques; form 
design and control; salary administration; and 
personnel selection, development, and super- 
vision. 

HIM 230— Directed Experience III (0-12-3) 

Winter. Prerequisites: HIM 202 and 220. Pre- 
or corequisite: HIM 203. 

This practicum emphasizes practical expe- 
rience in coding final diagnoses and operative 
procedures, preparation of source docu- 
ments, practicing indexing methods, statistics, 
and correspondence/release of information 
procedures. 

HIM 240— Directed Experience IV (0-16-4) 

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM 203, 230, and 
215. 

Emphasis is placed on the managerial and 
technical concerns of the student practition- 
ers. Each student completes an on-site visit to 
another health care facility near their clinical 
site, preferably a more non-traditional setting 
for medical record practitioners, during this 
course. Additionally, each student completes 
a practicum project that will be of benefit to 
both the student and the clinical site. (The 
directed experience supervisors suggest suit- 
able projects and a determination as to the 
student's assignment is based on this list). 
This directed clinical experience applies to the 
synthesis of the program of studies and pre- 
pares the student for transition to the graduate 
role. 



Health Science 

Faculty 

Parsons, Dennis, Program Director 



The overall goal of this program is to make 
available an educational opportunity for per- 
sons interested in entering a health field and 
an academic program for experienced health 
professionals who wish to further their career 
opportunities. More specifically, the objectives 
of the program are: 

1 . To teach individuals that behavioral change 
can occur through education; 



HEALTH SCIENCE 



141 



2 To foster health, health promotion, and di- 
sease prevention, 

3 To prepare competent, knowledgeable 
health educators; and, 

4 To provide health practitioners the oppor- 
tunity to gain expertise in the health related 
areas of education, management, correc- 
tional science, public policy, or computer 
science. 

The emphasis of the curriculum is to view 
"health" as different from "illness" and is 
designed to teach new students as well as 
practicing health professionals, about the 
health/illness continua The curriculum will 
permit the student to earn a baccalaureate 
degree that reflects expertise in health 
science while focusing on an applied health 
related area. Upon graduation, these health 
professionals will implement the concepts 
they have learned and direct the efforts of the 
American public to the promotion and mainte- 
nance of health, disease prevention and the 
curing of illness. 

Progression Requirements 

1. Students must complete 90 hours of 
appropriate coursework before profes- 
sional courses may be taken. 

2. Students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.0, 
with not more than one science repeat, to 
remain in the program. 

3. To earn "advanced standing" status, all 
previous coursework will be subject to 
faculty evaluation. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 

200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 
ENG 222; PHI 200 5 

Area II 20 

1. CHE 121, 122 10 

2. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 10 

2. POS 113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 

201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HS100 5 

2. HIS 150 and 251 or 252 10 

3. PSY 101 5 

4. ZOO 208,209 10 



i V 6 

i PE11 1 and 103 oi 108 

2. Three activity courses 

B. El' ;>prupriate to 

Emphasis 10 

C Courses in the U 55 

1 BIO 310 

2. HS 1 50, 200, 201 , 220. 230 25 

3. HS 300, 350, 400, 450, 451 25 

D. Courses in the Emphasis Area 30 

Area I — Health Education 30 

1 EDU 335, PSY 301 10 

2. HE 300, 320, 410, 420 20 

Area II— Computer Science 30 

1. MAT 103 or 220 5 

2. CS 231 , 306, 331 , 332, 431 25 

Area III— Correctional 

Science 30 

1. CJ 100, 102,210,303,409 25 

2. CJ elective 5 

Area IV— Education 30 

1. EDN 460 5 

2. EDU 335,340,451,455 20 

3. PSY 301 5 

Area V — Management 30 

1. BA 21 1,360 10 

2. PSY 320 5 

3. Any one of the following three: 

a. Decision-Making 

1. BA212 5 

2. BA 320, 330 or BA 425 
and ECO 305 10 

b. Human Relations 

Any of the following three 
courses: BA 375, 462; PSY 
321,322 15 

c. Public Policy 

1. POS 305 and 306 or 

307 10 

2. POS 401 or 403 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 191 



OFFERINGS 

Health Science Offerings 

HS 100— Introduction to Health Science 
(5-0-5) 

Exploration of the science of health. Based 
on the health (versus illness) model, this 
course will emphasize the enchantment of 
health as part of natural human development. 
The multifaceted health care delivery system 
will be introduced, and some ethical, philosoph- 
ical, and socio-cultural issues of health care 
will be discussed. 



142 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HS 110— Medical Terminology (2-0-2) 

A study of the language of medicine: word 
construction; definition; abbreviations and 
symbols; and use of terms related to all areas 
of medical science, hospital service, and the 
medical specialties. Open to non-majors. 

HS 150— Health Care Delivery Systems 
(5-0-5) 

Existing modalities for treatment, habita- 
tion, and rehabilitation will be identified. Their 
integration into primary, secondary, and ter- 
tiary treatment complexes will be discussed. 
Cost of illness and health care delivery will be 
addressed. 

HS 200-201— Health and Human Develop- 
ment (5-0-5) 

The natural enfoldment of the human will be 
presented emphasizing critical stages, and 
their respective developments and accomplish- 
ments—all from the perspective of enhancing 
health with concomitant avoiding of illness. 

HS 220— Nutrition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BIO and CHE sequences. 

Nutrition, as a major component of lifestyle, 
is related to enhancement of health and con- 
tribution to illness. Basic concepts of nutrition 
and various "diets" are studied. 

HS 230— Epidemiology (5-0-5) 

The application of ecology to health and 
illness. An investigation into the various fac- 
tors and conditions that determine the occur- 
rence and distribution of health, disease, and 
death among groups of individuals. 

HS 300— Health Problems in a Changing 
Society (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HIS 1 50; HS 230; BIO 31 0. 

A review of health status as a function of 
societal change For example, the effects on 
health of sewage disposal, speed-limits, cold- 
war, technology, and such will be examined. 

HS 350— Health in the Community (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HS 230; HS 300. 

The environment, communicable infections, 
health education, available treatment centers, 
and socio-political apparatus for change are 
integrated and viewed as dynamics of the 
community which may enhance health and 
prevent illness and injury. 

HS 400— Seminar in Health Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 350. 

Health Science concepts are analyzed and 



synthesized. Emerging and emergent issues 
and trends are investigated. 

HS 450-451— Health Science Practicum 
(1-8-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 400 

A two-quarter sequence offering the Health 
Science degree candidate opportunity to be 
an active participant in the student's area of 
interest. The practicum will provide the basis 
for the required senior thesis. 



Health Education Offerings 

HE 300— Methods and Media in Health 
Education (5-0-5) 

The basic principles of education, inte- 
grated with various teaching methods and 
media appropriate to a health care setting, will 
be explored. The methods and media will be 
designed for the biopsychosocial require- 
ments of the client. 

HE 320— Health Education in the Life 
Cycle (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HS 200 and 201 . 

Utilizing the principles of peda- and androg- 
ogy the needs and outcomes of improved 
health practices will be examined. The health 
education needs based on a Human Devel- 
opment model (i.e. from preconception to 
death) will be explored. Topics included will be 
such as lifestyles, stress, leisure, and sexuality. 

HE 410— Health Education in the 
Community (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HS 300 and HS 350. 

A course designed to examine the process 
of assessing, planning, implementing and eval- 
uating the health education needs of members 
of and groups within a community. The theo- 
ries of group process, motivation and human 
development will be used extensively. 

HE 420— Health Education in Rehabili- 
tation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HE 410. 

This course is designed to provide the stu- 
dent with the information necessary to aid 
patients in achieving their highest rehabilita- 
tion potential. The main objective is to aid the 
client in coping and complying with the pre- 
scribed regiment. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



143 



Medical Technology 

Faculty 

- . Program Director 
Miller, James. Medical Director 



Medical technology is a career in clinical 
laboratory medicine Medical technologists 
perform and or supervise the testing of blood, 
urine, spinal fluid and other body specimens. 
Applying the knowledge of chemistry, mathe- 
matics and biology, the medical technologist 
uses both manual and automated techniques 
to provide diagnostic data to the physicians. 

The B S in Medical Technology curriculum 
is a 4 year program During the first two years, 
the students must complete core curriculum 
courses in chemistry, biology, mathematics, 
humanities and social science. The profes- 
sional medical technology courses which 
include lecture and laboratory are offered dur- 
ing the Junior and Senior years (7 quarters). As 
part of the senior year curriculum the clinical 
practicum will be provided at the clinical 
laboratories of Candler General Hospital and 
St Joseph's Hospital, both located in Savan- 
nah Upon completion of the program, gradu- 
ates will be eligible to take the examination of 
the Board of Registry for Medical Technolo- 
gists of the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists and/or the Clinical Laboratory 
Scientist examination of the National Certifica- 
tion Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel. 

Insurance and Forms 

Students accepted into the program will be 
required to submit a completed Armstrong 
State College Human Services Student Health 
Appraisal form and to obtain a transcript eval- 
uation by the National Accrediting Agency for 
Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). Prior 
to enrollment in the clinical practicum the stu- 
dent will be required to provide evidence of 
liability insurance. 

Progression Requirements 

1 A grade of "C" or better must be earned in 
all MT courses. A student will not be permit- 
ted to register for an MT course unless a 
"C " or better has been earned in the pre- 
vious course. 

2 A student may repeat only one MT course. 
3. A student who must repeat more than one 

MT course will be dismissed from the pro- 
gram with no option for readmission. 



A An overall GPA of 2 is f to remain 

in the program 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

Hours 

A General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1 ENG 101. 102.201 15 

2 One course selected from ART 

200, 271, 272, 273. ENG 222. 
MUS 200, PHI 200 5 

Area II 20 

1. BIO 101, 102 10 

2. MAT 101.220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 5 

2. POS 113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 

201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 
201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129,281 15 

2. Three courses selected from: CS 
110, 11 5, 200; ZOO 208, 209; PHY 
212, 213 or one science course 
approved by program director ..15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 211 ... 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 99 

1 . Upper Division Sequences 25 

Bio 351, 353 10 

CHE 341, 342, 380 15 

2. Professional Courses 74 

MT 31 0, 320, 330, 340, 350, 360, 
370, 380, 390, 420, 430, 440, 
450,460,470,480,490 74 

C. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 200 

OFFERINGS 

MT 31 0— Urinalysis and Body Fluids (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program 
or permission of program director. 

A qualitative and quantitative study of the 
chemical and microscopic constituents of 
urine and other body fluids and the clinical 
significance of the test results 

MT 320— Clinical Microbiology I (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: BIO 351 or permission of pro- 
gram director. 



144 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



A study of the relationship of bacteria to 
disease. Major emphasis is placed on the iso- 
lation and identification of bacteria responsi- 
blefor human diseases. Also included is sensi- 
tivity testing and mycobacteriology. 

MT 330— Clinical Hematology I (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program 
or permission of program director. 

A qualitative and quantitative study of the 
formed elements of the blood. To include the 
complete blood count and specialized test 
procedures. This course will also include the 
basic principles of hemostasis and blood 
coagulation. 

MT 340— Clinical Immunohematology I 
(3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program 
or permission of program director. 

A study of basic immunohematologic prin- 
ciples and their application to the preparation 
and administration of whole blood and blood 
components. To include the selection and 
processing of donors, cross matching proce- 
dures, and antibody identification. 

MT 350— Clinical Chemistry I (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: CHE 380, 342 and MT 360 or 
permission of program director. 

A comprehensive study of the physiological 
principles, methodology and clinical signifi- 
cance of the biochemicals and elements 
found in the body fluids. 

MT 360— Clinical Instrumentation (3-2-4) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program 
or permission of program director. 

A basic study of the principles and operation 
of laboratory instrumentation. Emphasis will be 
placed on the individual components and the 
inter-relationship of the components. Electron- 
ics will be included. 

MT 370— Clinical Serology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program 
or permission of program director. 

A study of the principles and procedures^ 
used in the isolation, identification and quanti-* 
tation of diagnostically significant antigens 
and antibodies. 

MT 380— Clinical Parasitology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program 
or permission of program director. 

A study of the pathogenesis, life cycle, and 
laboratory identification of human parasites. 

MT 390— Clinical Mycology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program 
or permission of program director. 



A study of the pathogenesis and laboratory 
isolation and identification of fungi that can 
invade humans. 

MT 420— Clinical Microbiology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clini- 
cal practicum and completion of MT 320. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of 
special topics in microbiology. 

MT 430— Clinical Hematology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clini- 
cal practicum and completion of MT 330. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of 
special topics in hematology. 

MT 440— Clinical Immunohematology II 
(2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clini- 
cal practicum and completion of MT 340. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of 
special topics in immunohematology. 

MT 450— Clinical Chemistry II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clini- 
cal practicum and completion of MT 350. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of 
special topics in clinical chemistry. 

MT 460— Clinical Practicum I (0-28-7) 

Prerequisite: Completion of respective MT 
courses. 

A structured clinical laboratory experience 
where the students integrate theory and appli- 
cation under supervision in the various areas 
of medical technology. This will provide time 
and facilities to allow the student to develop 
speed, confidence, and organization and to 
analyze and solve technical problems. 

MT 470— Clinical Practicum II (0-28-7) 

Continuation of MT 460. 

MT 480— Clinical Practicum III (0-32-8) 

Continuation of MT 470. 

MT 490— Management and Education 
(2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Completion of MT 460 and MT 
470. 

Basic concepts of laboratory management, 
leadership and education. 



Radiologic Technologies 

Faculty 

Tilson, Elwin, Program Director 



Radiologic Technology is a comprehensive 
term that is applied to the science of adminis- 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 



145 



tenng ionizing radiation and other forms of 
energy to provide technical information and 
assistance to the physician in the diagnosis 
and treatment of diseases and injuries This 
field offers tour specific career specialities 
radiography, nuclear medicine technology, 
radiation therapy technology and diagnostic 
medical sonography At present, the Radio- 
logic Technologies Program offers an Asso- 
ciate Degree in the specialty area of 
radiography 

Program Goals 

The specific goals of the Program are as 
follows 

1. To educate superlative clinicians. In addi- 
tion to mastering basic skills necessary to 
perform routine radiographic examinations, 
the Program's graduate will possess skills 
necessary to perform non-routine and spe- 
cial radiographic procedures 

2. To expose the student to an in-depth anal- 
ysis of the art and science of radiography. 
The student will receive not only an in- 
depth exposure to radiography but also to 
related natural and social sciences. 

3. To give the students a well rounded liberal 
arts education. In addition to the profes- 
sional component of the curriculum, the 
student receives a well rounded liberal arts 
exposure so that the student will be able to 
effectively integrate into the society. 

Insurance, Forms, Transportation 

Student radiographers participate in Clinical 
Education experiences at local hospitals and 
other community agencies and are responsi- 
ble for providing their own transportation. The 
Program requires students to submit a com- 
pleted health history form and evidence of lia- 
bility insurance prior to participating in Clinical 
Education. Specific information regarding 
these requirements will be distributed to can- 
didates admitted to the Program. 

Progression Requirements 

For progression through the Program, the 
following must be maintained: 
1 . Science courses (ZOO 208, 209, 21 5, CHE 
201, CS 115, PHY 201, 202) 

a. A passing grade in each course ("D" or 
better). 

b. A "C" or better in at least two of these 
courses. 

c A student may repeat only one of these 
courses 

d. Students who must repeat more than 
one science course because of grade of 
"F" will be suspended from the Program 



2 Radiography coi. 

a A (; ttei In each Radiography 

coi/ 

b A student may rep- n Radiog- 

raphy course only 0H6 ' 

c Ash, repeat only two Radiog- 

raphy courses 
d Students who must repeat any one Rac 

raphy course more than one time will be 
dismissed from the Program 

e Students who must repeat more than 
two Radiography courses will be dis- 
missed from the Program 

3 The maintenance of an overall grade point 
average of 2.0 is required throughout the 
program When a student falls below the 
adjusted GPA of 2.0, the student will be 
placed on probation, suspended, or dis- 
missed after a review by the faculty of the 
Program. 

Attendance and Advanced Standing 

A student must matriculate each quarter, 
including Summer Quarter, to remain in the 
Progam. If, because of illness or other exten- 
uating circumstances, a student needs to be 
away from school for a quarter, the student 
must seek formal approval from the Program 
Director for such an absence. If such approval 
is not sought and granted, the student will be 
dropped from active status and must reapply 
for admission before continuing in the 
Program. 

The Radiologic Technologies Program is 
committed to a philosophy of educational flex- 
ibility to meet the needs of the profession. Indi- 
viduals who are graduates of Certificate (hos- 
pital) Programs and individuals working in the 
profession who are not certified by the Ameri- 
can Registry of Radiologic Technologists may 
receive advanced standing by a process of 
exemption examinations and CLEP examina- 
tions. Please see the Program for details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGIC 
TECHNOLOGIES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 38 

Area I 15 

ENG 101, 102 10 

PHI 200 5 

Area II 5 

MAT 101 5 

Area III 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

POS113 5 



146 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area IV 5 

CHE 201 5 

AreaV 3 

Any three physical education 
credits 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 61 

RAD 101. 103, 104, 111, 112, 

113, 114, 121, 122, 123 29 

RAD 200, 204, 205, 221, 222, 
223,224,225 32 

C. Courses in Related Fields 30 

CS 115, HS 110 7 

PHY 201,202 8 

ZOO 208, 209, 21 5 15 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 129 

Radiologic Technologies Offerings 

RAD 101— Introduction to Radiologic 
Technology (2-0-2) 

The role of the Radiologic Technologist is 
presented in the historical context of medicine 
and radiology within the health care delivery 
system. The organizational structure of the 
Radiology Department, specialities within the 
profession, professional organizations, accred- 
itation, certification, and licensure are dis- 
cussed. Interpersonal skills, elementary radia- 
tion protection, and professional development 
are emphasized. 

RAD 103— Radiation Protection (2-0-2) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Pro- 
gram and RAD 101. 

This course is designed to give the radiog- 
raphy student an understanding of radiation 
protection methods and the effects of radiation 
exposure. Topics included will be measure- 
ment and protection methods for various types 
of radiation as well as a discussion of somatic 
and genetic effects. Emphasis will be given to 
NCRP recommendations. 

RAD 104— Principles of Radiographic 
Exposure (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Pro- 
gram. PHY 202 must betaken as a corequisite 
or prerequisite. 

Factors influencing radiologic quality and 
conditions influencing exposures are pre- 
sented. Attenuating devices, beam restricting 
devices, and accessory equipment are dem- 
onstrated. Technic charts and formation are 
vehicles for the application of the radiologic 
process. 



RAD 111— Radiographic Procedures I 
(1-4-2) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Pro- 
gram ZOO 208 must be taken as either a 
corequisite or prerequisite. 

This course introduces the student to the 
basic theory and principles of radiographic 
procedures of the extremities, shoulder girdle, 
and pelvic girdle. Emphasis is placed on osteo 
anatomy, spatial relationships, patient posi- 
tioning, equipment manipulation, and quality 
evaluation of the radiographic study. 

RAD 112— Radiographic Procedures II 
(3-3-4) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Pro- 
gram and RAD 111. 

The theory and principles of radiographic 
examinations of the chest and abdomen are 
studied. Emphasis is placed on radiographic 
examinations of the visceral organs requiring 
the use of contrast media, spatial relation- 
ships, patient positioning, equipment manipu- 
lation, and quality evaluation of the study. 

RAD 113— Radiographic Procedures III 
(3-3-4) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Pro- 
gram and RAD 112. 

The theory and principles of radiographic 
examinations of the spines, facial bones and 
cranium are studied. Emphasis is placed on 
the osteo anatomy, spatial relationships, 
patient positioning, equipment manipulation, 
and quality evaluation of the study. 

RAD 114— Radiographic Procedures IV 
(3-3-4) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Pro- 
gram and RAD 113. 

The theory and principles of non-routine 
radiographic examinations are studied. Topics 
included are studies of the neurovascular sys- 
tem, central nervous system, heart, breast, 
reproductive organs, and additional non- 
routine examinations involving contrast media 
or specialized instrumentation. Emphasis will 
be given to preparation of special procedures 
suites, sterile technique, and utilization of spe- 
cialized equipment. 

RAD 121— Clinical Education I (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Pro- 
gram, RAD 101, RAD 200, and permission of 
the instructor. 

Orientation to patient care, introduction to 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 



147 



areas involving the field of radiology, and 
orientation to the clinical setting are pre- 
sented This is a supervised clinical practice in 
performing radiographic procedures, radiation 
protection, patient care, equipment orienta- 
tion, radiographic technique, darkroom proce- 
dures, and film quality evaluation Compe- 
tency evaluation of routine radiographic exam- 
inations is included 

RAD 122— Clinical Education II (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites RAD 121 and permission of 
the instructor 

This is a supervised clinical practice in per- 
forming radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of 
routine radiographic examinations. 

RAD 123— Clinical Education III (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: RAD 122 and permission of 
the instructor RAD 1 04 and RAD 1 1 3 must be 
taken as a corequisite or prerequisite. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 
in performing radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of 
routine radiographic examinations. 

RAD 200— Nursing Procedures (1.5-1.5-2) 

Prerequisite: Formal admission to the 
Program. 

The student is introduced to basic nursing 
techniques as they relate to the patient in the 
Radiology Department. Topics included are 
psychological needs of patients, meeting 
physical requirements of patients, transporting 
and moving of patients, monitoring of patients, 
suctioning, catheterization, administration of 
injections, I.V. maintenance, and dealing with 
emergency medical situations. Course also 
includes C.P.R. certification. 

RAD 204— Advanced Radiographic 
Exposure (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: RAD 104. 

This course is a continuation of RAD 104. 
This is a more in-depth look at the factors 
influencing radiographic quality and condi- 
tions influencing exposures. Emphasis is 
given to specialized equipment and techniques. 

RAD 205— Quality Assurance (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is a study of equipment testing 
and instrumentation, record keeping systems, 
and statistical analysis of equipment and 
supply usage. Emphasis will be given to testing 
procedures. QA program implementation, and 
federal government guidelines. 



RAD 221-Cllnlcal Education IV (0-24-3) 
Prerequisites RAD 123 and permission of 

the instructor 
This course is a supervised clinical practice 

in performing radiographic procedures with an 

emphasis on the competency evaluation of 

radiographic examinations 

RAD 222— Clinical Education V (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites RAD 221 and permission of 
instructor 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 
i performing radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of 
radiographic examinations. 

RAD 223— Clinical Education VI (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 222 and permission of 

the instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 

i performing radiographic procedures with an 

mphasis on the competency evaluation of 

radiographic examinations. 

RAD 224— Clinical Education VII (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites. RAD 223 and permission of 
instructor. 

Thiscourse isa supervised clinical practice 
in performing radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of 
radiographic examinations. 

RAD 225— Clinical Education VIII (2-35-12) 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 
required Radiologic Technologies courses 
and permission of instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 
in performing radiographic procedures and an 
exposure to various specialized areas within 
the profession of Radiologic Technology. 
Emphasis is placed on the competency eval- 
uation of radiographic examinations and 
demonstration of basic skills in various spe- 
cialized areas within the profession. 



Respiratory Therapy 

Faculty 

Bowers, Ross, Department Head 

Di Benedetto, Robert, Medical Director 

Mazzoli, Andrew, Director of Clinical Education 

Smith, William 

Taft, Arthur 



For the two-year (seven consecutive quar- 
ters) program leading to the Associate in 



148 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Science degree in Respiratory Therapy, the 
student must complete a curriculum of 61 
quarter hours in academic courses and 60 
quarter hours within the major. The AS. 
degree from an accredited Respiratory Ther- 
apy program qualifies the graduate for entry 
into the Registry credentialing system. The 
Registry is the highest professional credential 
available in the field of respiratory therapy. The 
credentialing process is a two-step nationally 
administered examination. Step 1 is a com- 
prehensive written exam to be taken shortly 
after graduation. The graduate who passes 
this exam will earn the entry level credential 
C.R.T.T. and will be eligible to enter the registry 
credentialing system. The registry exam con- 
sists of a written and a clinical simulation com- 
ponent. The candidate who passes both parts 
of the registry exam will earn the credential 
Registered Respiratory Therapist. It will take 
the candidate at least one year following gra- 
duation to complete the Registry. During the 
year following graduation the candidate must 
work at least 20 hours per week in a respiratory 
therapy department which has a Medical Direc- 
tor. 

Progression Requirements 

1 A grade of "C" or better must be earned in 
each core curriculum (academic) course. 
No more than one repeat grade per course 
will be acceptable. 

2. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in 
each Respiratory Therapy course. No more 
than one repeat grade per course will be 
acceptable. 

3. A Respiratory Therapy course in which the 
student makes a "D" or "F" must be 
repeated at its next offering. Because of 
curriculum structure, each Respiratory 
Therapy course is offered only one time per 
year. The student who must repeat a Respi- 
ratory Therapy course will be out of the 
program for three quarters until the course 
can be repeated. 

4. if a student fails to make a "C" or better in 
any course that is repeated, this will be 
grounds for dismissal from the Respiratory 
Therapy Program. A student who has been 
dismissed from the program for any reason 
will not be eligible for readmission. 

5. An overall GPA of 2.0 or better is required to 
graduate from the Respiratory Therapy 
Program. 

Attendance Regulations 

A student must matriculate each succes- 
sive quarter to remain in the program. If the 



student needs to be away from school for a 
quarter the student must seek formal approval 
from the Program Director for such an 
absence. If approval is not sought and granted, 
the student will be dropped from active status 
and must reapply for admission to the Respira- 
tory Therapy major before continuing in the 
program. The student who applies for read- 
mission must meet the existing requirements 
of the program. 

Advanced Standing 

The Respiratory Therapy Program has a 
comprehensive advanced standing policy. 
The program utilizes transfer credit, credit by 
examination, and credit for developmental 
experiences as a mechanism for granting 
advanced standing. A maximum of 25 credit 
hours may be clepped in the A.S. degree pro- 
gram. The program maintains a philosophy of 
educational flexibility to meet the needs of the 
profession. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN 
RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 28 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

2. MAT 101 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252, POS113 10 

4. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

B. Pre-Professional Courses 33 

1. ZOO 208, 209, 211 13 

2. BIO 210 5 

3. CHE 201, 202 10 

4. One course selected from: ANT 
201.SOC201 orPSY 101 5 

C. Courses in Respiratory Therapy 60 

1. RT 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 
and 107; HIS 110 34 

2. RT 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 
and 207 27 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations _0 

TOTAL 122 



OFFERINGS 

RT 101— Introduction to Respiratory 
Therapy (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Direct admission into the 
Respiratory Therapy Program. 

An introductory course in the evolution of 
the respiratory therapy profession and the 
modern respiratory therapy department. The 
student will: study physical principles related 
to gases; manufacture and storage of medi- 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 



149 



cal gases, gas administration equipment, oxy- 
gen delivery systems, environmental control 
systems; humidifiers, nebulizers, oxygen con- 
trolling devices and oxygen analyzers 

RT 102— Pulmonary Pharmacology (5-0-5) 

Winter Prerequisite Permission of the 
instructor 

This course is designed to give the student 
an in-depth look at drugs that directly affect 
the pulmonary system During this course the 
student will study routes of drug administration, 
pharmacodynamics, drug interactions, muco- 
kinesis and mucokmetic drugs, broncho- 
spasm and bronchodilators, cholinergic drugs, 
cromolyn sodium, corticosteroids, antibiotics, 
antitiberculan drugs, respiratory stimulants 
and depressants, anesthetics and neuro- 
muscular blockers. 

RT 103— Basic RT Skills I (3-10-5) 

Winter Prerequisites: CHE 201 and RT 1 01 . 

This course is designed to develop clinical 
competence in administering basic respira- 
tory therapy. The student will study: CPR, 
infection control, cleaning and sterilization of 
RT equipment, aerosol therapy, aerosol gen- 
erators, post-op pulmonary complications, 
incentive spirometry, IPPB and basic patient 
monitoring skills. The student will be able to 
demonstrate clinical competence in each ther- 
apeutic modality. 

RT 104-Basic RT Skills II (3-10-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: CHE 201, ZOO 208, 
RT 103. 

This course is designed to develop addi- 
tional clinical competence in administering 
basic respiratory therapy. The student will 
study: chest physiotherapy/bronchial drain- 
age, suctioning technique, pulmonary rehabili- 
tation, artificial airways, airway management, 
intubation technique, weaning techniques and 
management of post extubation complica- 
tions. The student should be able to demon- 
strate clinical competence in each therapeutic 
modality. 

RT 105— Diagnostic Techniques I (4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: CHE 201, ZOO 208, 
RT 103. 

This course is designed to introduce the 
student to techniques used to diagnose pul- 
monary and cardiovascular disease. The stu- 
dent will study: basic spirometry, tests 
designed to measure TLC, tests designed to 
diagnose early small airway disease, tests 
designed to diagnose diffusion abnormalities, 



ventilation/ perfusion scans 
choscopy and blood gases 

RT 106— Pulmonary Medicine/Pathology 
(5-0-5) 

Summer Prerequisites ZOO 209, RT 105 
and/or permission of tf • 'or 

This course is designed to provide the stu- 
dent with the current state of the art in diagnos- 
ing and managing pulmonary abnormalities 
The student will study the: etiology, epidemiol- 
ogy, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, 
diagnosis, complications, management and 
prognosis of pulmonary diseases The student 
will observe slides and handle pathologic 
specimens during this course. The course will 
primarily be taught by leading physicians in the 
community. 

RT 107— Diagnostic Techniques II (0-16-2) 

Summer. Prerequisites: ZOO 209 and RT 
105. 

This course is designed to be the clinical 
component of RT 105. The student should be 
able to demonstrate clinical competence in 
the following respiratory skills: arterial stick, 
interpretation and management of blood gas 
abnormalities, interpretation of pulmonary 
function tests, bedside pulmonary function 
screening, preparation of a patient for bron- 
choscopy and cleaning/maintenance of a 
bronchoscope. 

RT 201— Critical Care Equipment (3-10-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: BIO 210 and RT 107 
and/or permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the stu- 
dent with an in-depth look at the principles, 
assembly, operation and modification of criti- 
cal care equipment. The student will study: the 
functional analysis of mechanical ventilators, 
assembly and modification of ventilator cir- 
cuits, arterial lines, swan ganz catheters, 
transducers, oscilloscopes, spirometers, pneu- 
motachometers and alarm systems. The stu- 
dent should be able to demonstrate lab exper- 
tise with this equipment by the end of the 
course. 

RT 202— Patient Assessment (3-10-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: BIO 210 and RT 107 
and/or permission of the instructor. 

This course is designed to teach the student 
how to do a pulmonary physical exam on a 
patient. The student will study how to take a 
patient history, ausculatation, palpation and 
percussion of the chest wall. The student will 
also study lab exams and nonpulmonary 



150 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



assessment of the patient. The student should 
be able to demonstrate clinical competence in 
physical assessment by the end of this course. 

RT 203— Adult Critical Care I (4-2-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: ZOO 211 and RT 201, 
202. 

This course is designed to focus on the care 
of the patient in the intensive care unit The 
student will study patient monitoring, hemody- 
namic monitoring, ventilator management, 
and clinical management of diseases and 
conditions commonly seen in ICU. The stu- 
dent should be able to identify clinical signs of 
respiratory distress and respond appro- 
priately. The student should be able to demon- 
strate clinical competence in the ICU by the 
end of this course and RT 204. 

RT 204— Adult Critical Care II (0-16-2) 

Winter. Prerequisites: ZOO 21 1 and RT 201 , 
202. 

This course is designed to be the clinical 
component of RT 201 and 203. The student 
should be able to demonstrate clinical compe- 
tence in all aspects of intensive respiratory 
care by the end of this course. 

RT 205— Management of the Respiratory 
Care Department (2-0-2) 

Spring. Prerequisites: CHE 202, RT 203, 204 
or by permission of the instructor. 

This course is designed to introduce the 
student to basic management responsibilities 
within the respiratory care department. The 
student will study: JCAH guidelines, quality 
control/audit, staffing/scheduling problems, 
evaluation systems, communication/interview- 
ing skills, budget preparations, and how to do 
time and motion studies. The student should 
be able to demonstrate competence in han- 
dling clinical simulation problems by the end of 
this course. 

RT 206— Pediatrics and Neonatal Care I 
(4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: CHE 202, RT 203, 
204. 

This course is designed to focus on pulmo- 
nary problems commonly seen in the pediatric 
patient and the high risk newborn. The student 
will study: development of the fetus, anatomic 
differences between the fetus and newborn 
infant, problems associated with delivery, eval- 
uation of the fetus in utero and following deliv- 
ery, pulmonary diseases associated with the 
newborn infant and their management. The 
student will also study equipment commonly 
used in the care of the pediatric and neonatal 
patient. 



RT 207— Pediatrics and Neonatal Care II 
(0-24-3) 

Spring. Prerequisites: CHE 202, RT 203, 
204. 

This course is designed to be the clinical 
component of RT 206. The student should be 
able to demonstrate clinical competence in all 
aspects of pediatric and neonatal care by the 
end of this course. 



Social Work and Sociology 

Faculty 

Satterfield, Neil, Program Director 
Brown, George 
Ralston, Mary 



The degree program in Social Work is being 
deactivated and is no longer offered to new 
majors. The social work degree (B.S.W.) is 
available only to students with senior level 
courses in social work needed. 

The minor in sociology (25 credit hours) 
remains available. 

Program for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Social Work 

Although the requirements for the entire 
program are shown, only 400 level courses are 
available. All 200 and 300 level social work 
courses have been deactivated. 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102,201 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 

200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 
PHI 200; ENG 222; DRS 228, 

341 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 220 or 290 10 

2. Laboratory science 

sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 10 

2. POS 113 5 

3. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HIS252;SOC201;SW250 .... 15 

2. Language sequence or ANT 

201, ECO 201, PHI 201 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 and 

211 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIOLOGY 151 



B Courses in the Major Field 55 

1 SW 309. 320. 330, 333. 334. 

400 30 

2 Two of the following 406. 410. 
430 10 

3 SW 451. 452 10 

4 SW475 5 

C Courses in Related Fields 30 

1 SOC 315 and SOC 340 or CJ 
390 10 

2. ANT 310 or HIS 374 or SOC 
350 5 

3 CJ 301 or CS 1 1 or POS 307 .. . 5 

4 PSY202 or 303 or 400 5 

5 ECO 201 (if previously taken, a 
social science elective from 
above) 5 

D General Electives 10 

TOTAL Upper Division Hours 95 
TOTAL Program Hours 191 

Minor Concentration 

The Sociology minor may be earned by 
meeting the following requirements: 

Hours 

1. SOC 201, 315, 320, 340 20 

2. One course selected from: SOC 
333,350,430,450 _5 

TOTAL 25 

OFFERINGS 

Social Work Offerings 

SW 400— Social Welfare Policy and 
Systems (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: SW 334. 

Predicated on the concept that wherever 
there is widespread human need or suffering 
there is a breakdown of some aspect of the 
social system, this course explores public atti- 
tude to social legislation to actual delivery of 
social services. Services are analyzed for 
response to human need, protection of human 
rights, effectiveness and efficiency. Funda- 
mentals of administration and impact of servi- 
ces on the individual, the family and the com- 
munity are likewise considered in some detail. 
Consideration to methods of evaluation and 
accountability are likewise emphasized. 

SW 406— Child Welfare (4-2-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: SW 334 or by permission 
of instructor. 

This course reviews child development and 
social behavior with an emphasis on the prac- 
tical application of understanding the psycho- 



social, mental, and physical development of 
children The environmental and family situa- 
tion is studied and related to the child's d< • . 
opment or lac • Actual work with i 

dren identified as needing tutorial I 
havioral com motional support, or 

environmental change is expected of each 
student participating The emphasis is on the 
disadvantaged child who is most subject to 
these problems. 

SW 410— Aging and Services to the 
Elderly (4-2-5) 

Winter Prerequisite: SW 334 or permission 
of instructor 

A course designed for students expecting to 
go into public or private agencies serving the 
elderly. Emphasis will be placed on the social, 
economic, and health needs of the elderly with 
attention to social service delivery systems 
that work. Developing knowledge in gerontol- 
ogy is integrated into the classroom and field 
projects wherever practicable. 

SW/SOC 430— Alcohol and Drug Studies 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: SC 334 or permission 
of instructor. 

A course focusing on the various forms of 
alcohol and drug abuse with emphasis on the 
stages of harmful dependence and addiction 
There will be an examination of the legal and 
social implications of addiction as well as 
approaches to treatment and rehabilitation. 

SW 451— Field Experience I (V-V-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Open to Social Work 
majors only. All majors must have completed 
the core curriculum and all required 1 00-200- 
300 level courses. 

Each student will work in a social service 
setting a minimum of 20 clock hours per week. 
The course is designed for optimal learning 
experiences with clients, agencies, and the 
community and to increase the student's 
knowledge and ability under professional 
supervision. There will be a weekly meeting 
with the field coordinator. (Approximately 200 
clock hours). 

SW 452— Field Experience II (V-V-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: SW 451 . 

This is an advanced field experience where- 
in greater proficiency and additional skills 
are expected from the student. The student 
must demonstrate competency in a variety of 
roles played by the generalist social worker. 
This course will be taken concurrently with SW 
475. (Approximately 200 clock hours). 



152 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SW 475— Senior Seminar (5-0-5) 

Spring Prerequisite: SW 451 . 

This is a course required of all SW majors 
and is taken concurrently with SW 452. It is 
designed to integrate classroom learning, 
basic theory, professional journal reports and 
life experience with the student's experience 
in the field. 

SW 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Invitation of professor. 

Experiential based study of a selected 
social work topic. Open to transient students 
only with permission of the Dean of Human 
Services at Armstrong and the college from 
which the student comes. 

SW 491— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Invitation of professor. 

Research and experiential based study in a 
social work topic of student interest or spe- 
cialty. Open to transient students only with 
permission of the Dean of Human Services at 
Armstrong. 

Sociology Offerings 

SOC 201— Introductory Sociology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the concept and methods 
of the science of human group behavior. 
Includes the study of socialization, the role of 
the individual in society, and the major institu- 
tions and processes. It is designed to provide a 
better understanding of American culture and 
the wide range of social phenomenon. 

SOC 315— The Family and Alternative 
Lifestyles (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201 . 

A study of the role of the family in the devel- 
opment of the individual, the family unit and 
societal institutions. Consideration will be 
given to various structures and functions of the 
family as it exists or is emerging in America. 

SOC/SW 320— Ethnic Minorities (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: SOC 201 . 

This course focuses on the present factual 
situation in America. The course examines the 
problems faced by minorities in America, 
especially where skin color and language 
pose social and economic barriers. It looks at 
dominant public institutions and patterns of 
response by minorities such as Black Ameri- 
cans, Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Native Ameri- 
cans, and other sizeable ethnic groups. 

SOC 333— Exploring Popular Culture 
(4-2-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: SOC 201 . Offered on 



demand and through independent study. 

An examination of popular culture using 
music, radio, television, texts, magazines, 
movies, technology and language to explore a 
given era. Comparisons will be made of life- 
styles, sex roles, racial attitudes and the na- 
tional regional mood of times examined. 

SOC 340— Methods of Social Research 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course will explore several methods of 
applied social research including case stud- 
ies, record research, experimental designs, 
surveys, observation and systems interaction 
as they apply to social data. The student must 
demonstrate a working knowledge of each 
method in the context of social work practice. 

SOC 350— Social Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

An examination of behavioral deviancy, 
normative strain, and differences between 
social ideals and social realities in the context 
of sociological theory. 

SOC/SW 430— Alcohol and Drug Studies 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: SW 334 or permission 
of instructor. 

A course focusing on the various forms of 
alcohol and drug abuse with emphasis on the 
stages of harmful dependence and addiction. 
There will be an examination of the legal and 
social implications of addiction as well as 
approaches to treatment and rehabilitation. 

SOC 450— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

By invitation of the professor. Offered on 
demand. Open to transient students only with 
permission of the Dean of Human Services at 
Armstrong. 



FACULTY ROSTERS 



Permanent, Full-Time Members of the 
Teaching Corps or Administrative Staff 

(This list includes only individuals who enjoy 
faculty voting privileges. The number in paren- 
theses after the names represents the initial 
year of employment at Armstrong State 
College. 



FACULTY ROSTER 



153 



Adams, Joseph V. (1970) 

Dean of Arts and Sciences 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph D . University of Alabama 

M A . Baylor University 

B A , Tennessee Temple College 

Adams, Teresa (1971) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
B S . West Liberty State College 

Aenchbacher, Louis E., Ill (1980) 

Instructor of Physical Education 
M.Ed.. University of Georgia 
B S , Armstrong State College 

Agyekum, Stephen K. (1979) 

Associate Professor of Elementary Education 
Ed.D.. University of Georgia 
MA. University of Georgia 
A B . Johnson C. Smith University 

Anderson, Donald D. (1966) 

Dean for Community Services 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D.. Auburn University 
MA. George Peabody College 
B.S.. Georgia Southern College 

Arens, Olavi (1976) 

: Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D.. Columbia University 

IMA. Columbia University 
A.B.. Harvard University 

Babits, Lawrence E. (1981) 

Assistant Professor of History and Archaeology 
Ph.D., Brown University 
MA. University of Maryland 
B.A., University of Maryland 

Ball. Ardella P. (1968) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.S., Atlanta University 

A.B.. Fisk University 

Barnard, Jane T. (1980) 

'Instructor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

M.S., Georgia Southern College 
B.S . Georgia Southern College 

Battiste. Bettye A. (1980) 

■ Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 
Ed.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., State University of New York 
B.S., Savannah State College 

iavlnka. Patricia (1980) 

• Xssistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
i M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
: B.S., Marquette University 
A.S., Marquette University 



Belin, Nancy I. (1980) 

Instructor of Nursing 

MSN, University of Rhode Island 
B S N , Columbia University 

Bell, Dorothy G. (1969) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M SN Emory University 
B.S.N University of Georgia 

Beumer, Ronald J. (1975) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
Ph D., University of Arkansas 
B.S., University of Dayton 

Blakely, Ann S. (1983) 

Librarian I 

MA, Emory University 
B.A., University of Arkansas 

Blalock, Virginia R. (1979) 

Associate Professor of Elementary Education 

S.Ed., Florida State University 

M.A.. Columbia University 

B.A.. Savannah State College 

Bland, Nancy V. (1974) 

Associate Professor of Elementary Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Clemson University 
B.A., Coker College 

Bowers, Ross L., Ill (1979) 

Head of Respiratory Therapy Department 
Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
B.S., Georgia State College 

Brandon, Stephen P. (1973) 

Head of Fine Arts Department 
Associate Professor of Music 

DMA., Catholic University of America 

MA, University of Iowa 

B.M.E., University of Kansas 

Brewer, John G. (1968) 

Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Brockmeier, Kristina C. (1981) 

Librarian I 

M.S., Florida State University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., University of Virginia 

Brooks, S. Kent (1976) 

Associate Professor of English 

Ph.D., George Washington University 
M.Ph., George Washington University 
M.A., University of Texas 
B.A., University of Texas 



154 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Brower, Moonyean S. (1967) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

MA. University of Massachusetts 
B.S., University of Massachusetts 

Brown, George E. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social 
Work 

M.S.S.W., Atlanta University 
B.S.W., Armstrong State College 
A.B , Armstrong State College 

Brown, Hugh R. (1968) 

Associate Professor of English 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
MAT., St. Michael's College 
B.S., Xavier of Ohio 

Bryner, Renald F. (1982) 

Instructor of Physical Education 
M.A., Lynchburg College 
B.S., Berry College 

Buck, Joseph A., Ill (1968) 

Dean for Student Affairs and Development 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.A., Auburn University 

Buck, Marilyn M. (1974) 

Head of Baccalaureate Nursing Department 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

B.S.N., Boston University 

Burgess, Clifford V. (1979) 

Professor of Education 
Ed.D., Auburn University 
M.A., George Peabody 
A.B., Mercer University 

Burnett, Robert A. (1978) 

Acting President 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
B.A., Wofford College 

Burroughs, Nelda F. (1981) 

Librarian I 

M.A., University of South Carolina 
B.A., North Carolina Central University 

Cochran, John H. (1979) 

Associate Professor of Elementary Education 
Ed.D.. University of Georgia 
M.A., Atlanta University 
B.A., Paine College 

Comaskey, Bernard J. (1966) 

Assistant Professor of History 
M.A., New York University 
B.A., Fordham College 



Cottrell, Ellen (1976) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.A., Agnes Scott College 

Coyle, William E. (1957) 

Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., Georgetown University 
A.B., Emory University 

Crain, Bradford L. (1981) 

Head of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 

Arts Department 
Professor of English 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

M.A., Harvard University 

B.A., Berea College 

Cyphert, Daniel S. (1981) 

Assistant Processor of Mathematics and Com- 
puter Science 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

M.S., Vanderbilt University 

B.S., Case Institute of Technology 

Dandy, Evelyn B. (1974) 

Head of Developmental Studies Department 
Assistant Professor of Reading 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

M.Ed., Temple University 

B.S., Millersville State College 

Davenport, Margaret G. (1980) 

Associate Professor of Art 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.S., Florida State University 

Douglass, W.Keith (1970) 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 
M.A., Syracuse University 
B.A., Franklin & Marshall College 

Duncan, John D. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Emory University 

M.A., University of South Carolina 

B.S., College of Charleston 

Dutko, Kathleen (1978) 

Instructor of Nursing 

M.A., New York University 
B.S.N., Niagara University 

Ealy, Steven D. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Claremont University 
B.A., Furman University 



FACULTY ROSTER 



155 



Easterling, William L. (1968) 

.sor of French and Spanish 
Ph.D.. University of Georgia 
M A , Middlebury College 
B.S.. Western Carolina 

Findeis, John (1968) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.S.. University of Illinois 
B.S.. University of Illinois 

Ford, Elizabeth J. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed.. Georgia Southern College 
B.S. Winthrop College 

Galloway, Herbert F. (1982) 

Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
Ed D , University of Georgia 
M.Ed.. University of Georgia 
MM., Florida State University 
B.M.. Florida State University 

Geoffroy, Cynthia D. (1978) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.S.. University of South Carolina 
B A . Westfield State College 

Goette, Mary (1976) 

Instructor of Chemistry 

A.B., Georgia State College for Women 

Gross, Jimmie F. (1967) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Auburn University 
B.A., Baylor University 

Guillou. Laurent J., Jr. (1970) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.S.. Louisiana State University 

Hansen, John R. (1967) 

Professor of Mathematics 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Troy State College 

Harbin, Mickie S. (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Texas (Arlington) 
M.A., University of Texas (Arlington) 
B.A., University of Texas (Arlington) 



Hardegree, Lester E., Jr. (1982) 

,am 
Assistant Professor of Mi ':hnology 

M Ed., Georgia Stat.' Univei 
B.S.. Medical Coll» jrgia 

B.S.. University of Georgia 

Harris, Henry E. (1966) 

Head of Chemistry and Physics I 

Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D.. Georgia Institute of Technology 
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Harris, Karl D. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Tennessee 
B.A.. Carson-Newman College 

Harris, Robert L. (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
DMA., University of the Pacific 
M.M., University of the Pacific 
B.M., University of the Pacific 

Hepner, Freddie S. (1980) 

Instructor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Armstrong State College 

Hough, Bonny E. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
Ph.D., Washington University 
M.M., Washington University 
B.A., Pomona College 

Hudson, Anne L. (1971) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., Tulane University 
M.S., Tulane University 
B.A., Hollins College 

Hunnicutt, George S. (1969) 

Registrar 

M.S., East Tennessee State University 
B.S., East Tennessee State University 

Jaynes, Michael L. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.A., Appalachian State University 

Jenkins, Marvin V. (1968) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Johanning, Gary (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Missouri 
B.S., University of Missouri 



156 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Jones, James L. (1968) 

Professor of English and Philosophy 
Ph D . Tulane University 
MA, Vanderbilt University 
B A . University of Tulsa 

Jones, Karl (Capt.) (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 
B A , University of Florida 

Keller, Carola (1970) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

MSN. Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N.. University of Virginia 

Kilhefner, Dale Z. (1973) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph D , Pennsylvania State University 
M.S.. Purdue University 
M.Ed.. Washington State University 
B.S., Elizabethtown College 

Killorln, Joseph I. (1947) 

Professor of Literature and Philosophy 
Ph.D.. Columbia University 
MA, Columbia University 
B.A., St. Johns College 

Knorr, Virginia W. (1973) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.S. University of Tennessee (Chattanooga) 
B.S .University of Tennessee (Chattanooga) 

Lane, Joseph M., Jr. (1970) 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D.. University of Georgia 
M.S.. University of Georgia 
B.S . University of Georgia 

Lanier, Osmos, Jr. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A.. Auburn University 
B.A.. LaGrange College 

Lariscy, Michael L. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed.. Georgia Southern College 
B.S.. Armstrong State College 

Lawson, Cornelia V. (1979) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D.. University of Arkansas 
MA. University of Southern Mississippi 
BS, Florida State University 

Lee, Byung Moo (1981) 

Librarian II 

MLS. University of Wisconsin 
B A.. University of Wisconsin 
B.A.. Yon Sei University 



Leska. Charles J. (1975) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 
Ph.D.. Syracuse University 
MA.. University of Vermont 
B.S., LeMoyne College 

Levett, Nettie M. (1975) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N.. Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. . Florida A & M University 

Magnus, Robert E. (1977) 

Director of Criminal Justice Graduate Program 

Professor of Criminal Justice 

Ed.D., Mississippi State University 
M.Ed.. Mississippi State University 
B.G.E.. University of Omaha 

Marohn, Ann E. (1980) 

Director of Health Information Management 

Program 
Assistant Professor of Health Information 

Management 

M.S.. State University of New York 

B.S.. Indiana University 

Martin, Grace B. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.A.. Armstrong State College 

Martin, William B. (1980) 

Instructor of English 
M.A., Duke University 
B.A.. Armstrong State College 

Massey, Carole M. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N.. Medical College of Georgia 

Mazzoli, Andrew J. (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
M.H.S.. Medical University of South Carolina 
B.S., State University of New York Medical 
Center 

McCarthy, John C, Jr. (1962) 

Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
MB. A., University of Georgia 
B.B.A., University of Miami 

McClanahan, Billie F. (1978) 
Instructor of English 

M.A., University of Georgia 

B.A., Armstrong State College 



FACULTY ROSTER 



157 



McCracken. Thomas C. (1974) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M A L S , University of Denver 
B S . Florida State University 

Megathlin, William L. (1971) 
Head of Criminal Justice Department 
Professor of Criminal Justice 
Ed D . University of Georgia 
M Ed . University of Georgia 
B A . Presbyterian College 

Menzel. George H. (1977) 

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 
J D . Georgetown University 
A B . Franklin & Marshall College 

Miller, Mary (1970) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

MSN, Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N.. Medical College of Virginia 



and Computer 



Munson, Richard E. (1972) 

Professor of Mathematics 
Science 

Ph.D.. Rutgers University 
M.S.. Rutgers University 
B.A .. Houghton College 



Murphy, Dennis D. (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 
J.D.. University of Florida 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed.. University of Florida 
B A.. University of Florida 

Nadalich, Peggy A. (1974) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
M.M.E.. Florida State University 
B.M.E.. University of Southern Mississippi 

Nash, Charles R. (1979) 

Dean of Education 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D., Mississippi State University 
M.Ed.. University of Southern Mississippi 
B.S.Ed., Jackson State College 

Newberry, S. Lloyd (1968) 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D.. University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S.Ed.. University of Georgia 

Newman, John F. (1968) 

Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.A.. Georgetown University 
B.A.. University of Maryland 



Noble. David (1969) 
Associate Professor of German and Latin 
PI ty 

A M . Boston University 
A B , Boston University 

Nordquist, Richard F. (1980) 

Instructor of English 

MA, University of Leicester 
B.A.. State University of New York 

Norsworthy, Gary (1980) 

Dean, Joint Continuing Education Center 
Ph.D.. Florida State University 
MA., Florida State University 
B.A., Florida State University 

Norwich, Vicki H. (1980) 

Instructor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

M.Ed.. Armstrong State College 
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University 

Orlando, Anthony 

Head of Military Science Department 
Assistant Professor of Military History 
M.S. Florida Institute of Technology 
B.S. State University of New York— Albany 

Palefsky. Elliot H. (1971) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Ed.S., Georgia Southern College 
Ed.M., Temple University 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Parsons, Dennis E. (1982) 

Director of Health Science Program 
Professor of Health Science 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.A., Union College 

B.S., Union College 

Patchak. Jane A. (1974) 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
M.A., Western Michigan University 
B.A., Central Michigan University 

Patterson, Robert L. (1966) 

Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., University of Kentucky 
B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan 

Pendexter, Hugh, III (1965) 

Professor of English 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
M.A., Northwestern University 
A.B., Bowdoin College 






158 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Pestel, Beverly (1975) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
M.S.. Wright State University 
B.A.. Cedarville College 

Pingel, Allen L. (1969) 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
MAT, University of North Carolina 
B.A., University of North Carolina 

Pruden, George B., Jr. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ph.D., American University 
M.A., American University 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., Wake Forest 

Ralston, Mary C. (1970) 

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social 
Work 

M.S.W., Tulane University 
B.A., Florida State University 

Ramsey, Virginia (1966) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A.T., Emory University 
A.B., Vanderbilt University 

Repella, James F. (1976) 

Dean of Human Services 

Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 
B.S.Ed., Temple University 

Rhee, Steve Y. (1974) 

Associate Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Missouri 
M.A., University of Oregon 
B.A., University of Oregon 

Richters, Stephen P. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., Brown University 
M.S., Brown University 
B.S., Vassar College 

Robbins, Paul (1966) 

Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 
B.S.. University of Pennsylvania 

Robinson, Aurelia D. (1979) 

Associate Professor of Education 
D.Ed., University of Oklahoma 
M.A., Atlanta University 
A.B., Spelman College 

Sandy, Gerald C. (1974) 

Director of Library and Administrative Services 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 
Ph.D., Florida State University 



M.S., Florida State University 
B.A., Youngstown State University 

Satterfield, Neil B. (1969) 

Head of Social Work Program 

Associate Professor of Sociology and Soci< 
Work 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.S.W., University of Tennessee 
A.B., University of North Carolina 

Schmidt, John C. (1979) 

Assistant Professor of Art 
M.F.A., Ohio University 
B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Schmitz, Catherine (1982) 

Instructor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Rush University 
B.S.N. , Duke University 

Shipley, Charles (1972) 

Professor of Mathematics and Compute 
Science 

Ph.D., University of Nebraska 
M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.A., University of North Dakota 
B.A., University of North Dakota 

Silcox, Elaine (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Florida 
B.S.N., University of Florida 

Simon, Emma T. (1974) 

Director of Dental Hygiene Program 
Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 

M.H.E., Medical College of Georgia 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

Sims, Roy J. (1955) 

Head of Physical Education Department 
Professor of Physical Education 

Ed.D., Louisiana State University 

M.S., University of Tennessee 

B.S., David Lipscomb College 

Smith, Carolyn G. (1977) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Smith, William J., Jr. (1982) 

Instructor of Respiratory Therapy 

B.S., Medical University of South Carolin; 

Stegall, John L. (1981) 

Vice President for Business and Finance 
MB. A., University of Georgia 
B.S., Indiana State University 



FACULTY ROSTER 



159 



Stephens, Jacquelyn W. (1979) 

Professor of Elementary Education 
Ed D , University of Oklahoma 
MS . Illinois State University 
B S . Savannah State College 

Stevens, Linda B. (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Special Education 
Ed D . University of Florida 
M S . University of Southern Mississippi 
B S . University of Southern Mississippi 

Stocker, Erich F. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of History and Computer 
Science 

MA, Ohio State University 
B A , Ohio State University 

Stokes, William W. (1967) 

Head of Secondary Education Department 
Professor of Education 

Ed.D.. University of Florida 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

B.A., University of Florida 

Stone, Janet D. (1976) 

Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., Emory University 
MA. Purdue University 
A B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College 

Stratton, Cedric (1965) 

. Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D.. University of London 
B.Sc , Nottingham University 

Strozier, Robert I. (1965) 

Professor of English 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
MA., Florida State University 
A.B.. University of Georgia 

Suchower, John (1969) 

Assistant Professor of Drama-Speech 
MA., University of Detroit 
B.A.. Fairfield University 

Taft. Arthur (1982) 

Instructor of Respiratory Therapy 
B.A., University of Texas 

Tanenbaum, Barbara G. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B S., Medical College of Georgia 

Tapp, Lawrence M. (1959) 

^ Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D.. University of Tennessee 
M.S., University of Tennessee 
B.S., University of Tennessee 



Thomas, Claudia (1976) 

Associate Professor of Special Education 

Ed D , University of Georgia 

M Ed , University of Georgia 

B A , Furman University 

Thorne, Francis M. (1965) 

Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S.. Stetson University 

Tilson, Elwin R. (1982) 

Director of Radiologic Technologies Program 
Assistant Professor of Radiologic Technologies 

M.S.. San Francisco State University 

B.S., Arizona State University 

Timberlake, Sara E. (1980) 

Instructor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 

Ward, Paul E. (1968) 

Head of Elementary Education Department 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Georgia Teachers College 

Warlick, Roger K. (1970) 

Head of History of Political Science Department 
Professor of History 

Ph.D., Boston University 

B.A., Arizona State University 

Welch, Claudia T. (1982) 

Head of Associate Degree Nursing Program 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., University of South Carolina 

Welsh, John A., Ill (1967) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Davidson College 

White, Charles C, Jr. (1963) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Southern Illinois University 
B.S., East Carolina University 

White, Susan S. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Speech Correction 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Winthrop College 

Whiten, Morris L. (1970) 

Professor of Physics 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 



160 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Williamson, Jane B. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M S N , Medical College of Georgia 
M.Ed.. Georgia Southern College 
B S N , University of Georgia 

Worthington, Clarke S. (1967) 

Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D.. Emory University 
MA, Northern Illinois University 
B A , University of Arizona 

Wyss, Jane A. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Music 

DMA, University of Texas, Austin 
MM, University of Texas, Austin 
B.M.. University of Texas, Austin 



Teaching Associates 

Dixon, Diane (1976) 

Teaching Associate Biology 
M.Ed , Armstrong State College 
B.S , Armstrong State College 

Fleming, Caroline (1977) 

Teaching Associate Dental Hygiene 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Gill, Gloria (1979) 

Teaching Associate Physical Education 
M.A., University of Alabama 
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University 

Giorgio, Patricia (1975) 

Teaching Associate Dental Hygiene 
AS., Loyola University, New Orleans 

Groover, Sandra (1982) 

Teaching Associate Dental Hygiene - 
B.S.. University of Louisville 



Roberts, Joseph (1979) 

Teaching Associate Physical Education 
B.A., St. Andrews College 
A. A.. Lake Sumter Community College 

Russell, Carol (1977) 

Teaching Associate Dental Hygiene 
B.S., Armstrong State College 
AS., Armstrong State College 

Schivera, Nena (1982) 

Teaching Associate Dental Hygiene 
B.S., Loyola University, New Orleans 



Emeriti Faculty 

Ashmore, Henry L. (1965-1982) 

President Emeritus 

Gadsden, Ida (1956-1981) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Lubs, Margaret (1948-1978) 

Professor of Languages Emerita 

Sartor, Herman (1964-1981) 

Professor of Education Emeritus 

Stanfield, Jule (1952-1981) 

Vice-President for Business and Finani 
Emerita 

Winn, William (1957-1971) 

Professor of Mathematics Emeritus 



Armstrong 

State 
f W J College 




1983-1984 
GRADUATE CATALOG 



1935 ABERCORN STREET 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

31406-7197 



162 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Special Note to Readers 

This Table of Contents applies only to the 
graduate section of this merged catalog. A 
separate Table of Contents in the Undergrad- 
uate Section applies to undergraduate con- 
tents. The Index applies only to graduate 
contents. 

Contents 

History, Purpose, Programs 1 62 

Graduate Admissions 1 63 

Graduate Academic Regulations 1 67 

Graduate Fees 1 70 

Graduate Degree Requirements 171 

Graduate Degree Programs 1 73 

Graduate Faculty 203 

Graduate Index 207 



Departmental Coordinators 

Biology To be appointed 

Chemistry Harris, Henry 

Criminal Justice Magnus, Robert 

Education-Elementary Ward, Paul 

Education-Physical Sims, Roy 

Education-Secondary Stokes, William 

English Crain, Bradford 

Health Science Parsons, Dennis 

History & Political Science . . . Warlick, Roger 
Mathematics Leska, Charles 



The Graduate Council 

The Graduate Council has general respon- 
sibility for policy making functions related to 
graduate programs, with its specific functions 
outlined in the College By-Laws. Members for 
1982-1983 included: 

Repella, James Chairman 

Adams, Joseph Arts and Sciences 

Battiste, Bettye Education 

Burgess, Clifford Education 

Cram, Bradford Arts and Sciences 

Geary, Murl Student Representative 

Magnus, Robert Human Services 

Menzel, George Human Services 

Munson, Richard Arts and Sciences 

Murphy, Dennis Human Services 

Stokes, William Education 

Warlick, Roger Arts and Sciences 



History 



The development of graduate education at 
Armstrong State College is linked to a history 
of graduate course offerings in Savannah 
which has involved several institutions of the 
University System of Georgia. Prior to 1968, 
only off-campus extension courses from the 
University of Georgia and other institutions 
were offered in Savannah. In the summer of 
1 968, Savannah State College began offering 
courses in residence for their new master's 
degree in elementary education. This program 
was accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and was approved by 
the Georgia State Board of Education. 

In the Fall of 1 971 , Armstrong State College 
and Savannah State College joined efforts to 
offer a joint program of graduate work. The 
combined faculties, library holdings, and facili- 
ties of the Colleges made possible the expan- 
sion of the graduate program to include a Mas- 
ter of Business Administration Degree Program; 
to add secondary options in the Master of 
Education degree program; and to supersede 
most of the off-campus courses offered in 
Savannah by other institutions. This Joint 
Graduate Studies Program of Savannah State 
College and Armstrong State College was fully 
accredited by the Southern Association of Col- 
leges and Schools, with its degree programs in 
education approved by the Georgia State 
Department of Education. 

Effective Fall, 1 979, the Joint Graduate Stud- 
ies Program was terminated by action of the 
Board of Regents, and Armstrong was autho- 
rized to continue its graduate offerings with a 
significant modification. All business adminis- 
tration programs, courses, and faculty were 
transferred to Savannah State College, and 
simultaneously, all teacher education pro- 
grams, courses, and faculty were transferrec 
to Armstrong State College. 

In Winter, 1 981 , the Master of Health Sciencei 
program was established. In Fall, 1981, the] 
Master of Science degree with a major in Crim-1 
inal Justice was approved by the Board o- 
Regents. The graduate course work for the MS 
in Criminal Justice Program was initiated in the 1 
Fall quarter 1982. 

Purpose 

The Graduate Program of Armstrong State 
College is dedicated to service through educa 
tional programs, community involvement, anc 



GRADUATE ADMISSIONS 



163 



to faculty and student research, scholarship 
and creativity By offering advanced prepara- 
tion to those who serve in the schools and in 
other professional activities, the program con- 
tributes to the development of professional 
people, and through them, to the well being of 
those whom these professionals serve. The 
philosophy of the Graduate Program affirms 
the dignity and worth of individuals and the 
realization that professional men and women 
must be productive, articulate, and pro-active. 

Degree Programs 

The following degrees are offered by the 
College. 

Master of Education with majors in: 

Biology (Deactivated) 

Business Education 

Chemistry (Deactivated) 

Early Elementary Education 

English 

General Science Education 

History 

Mathematics 

Middle School Education 

Physical Education 

Political Science 

Special Education— Behavior Disorders 

Special Education— Learning Disabilities 

Special Education— Speech/ Language 
Pathology 
(English, History and Political Science are 
> available as options without teacher-certifica- 
tion requirements). 
Master of Health Science with options in: 

Administration 

Computer Science 

Education 

Health Education 

Public Policy 
Master of Science in Criminal Justice 



ADMISSIONS 



Requirements 



Applicants desiring admission on a degree- 
seeking status must present satisfactory under- 
graduate academic records and satisfactory 
scores on appropriate admissions examina- 
tions. Some of the graduate degree programs 
have specialized test requirements, specified 
undergraduate course requirements, or other 
requirements for degree-seeking students. Re- 



fer to the departmental sections for specific 
information on these requirements 

General requirements for degree-seeking 
students include the following applicants for 
all Master of Education programs must provide 
satisfactory scores on either the Aptitude Test 
of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or 
the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) Satisfactory 
undergraduate grades must be presented by 
all degree-seeking students. Applicants for the 
Master of Health Science program must pro- 
vide satisfactory scores on either the Gradu- 
ate Record Exam (GRE), the Graduate Man- 
agement Aptitude Test (GMAT), or the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT). Applicants for the MS 
Degree in Criminal Justice must provide a 
satisfactory score on the Aptitude Test of the 
Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT). 

Admission to some programs may require 
satisfactory scores on either the appropriate 
area examination of the NTE or the appro- 
priate advanced test of the GRE. For details of 
such requirements, consult the appropriate 
departmental entry in the Catalog or the Depart- 
ment Head. 

Applications for the above examinations are 
usually available at the College and will be 
given to students who come to the College to 
obtain them. Students who wish to write for an 
application form or to submit an applicatron for 
the GRE or GMAT. should contact: Edu- 
cational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, 08540. Students who wish to take the 
MAT should contact the appropriate Dean's 
office. Students should request that their test 
scores be sent to the Graduate Admissions 
Office, Armstrong State College, Savannah, 
Georgia 31 406. 

Categories of Admission 
Regular Degree Status 
Definition 

Regular Admission means that a student 
has met all admission requirements and is 
admitted to a degree program with full gradu- 
ate status. 



Requirements 



A student who has earned a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited college, who has 
completed all of the prerequisites for his 
planned graduate field of study, and who 
meets the other requirements of the Graduate 



164 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Program may be admitted on Regular Admis- 
sion status. These requirements include min- 
imum undergraduate grade-point averages in 
combination with certain minimum test scores. 

For M.Ed, programs, a minimum GPA of 2.5 
and a minimum test score of 44 on the MAT or 
800 on the GRE Aptitude examination are 
required. 

For the M.H.S. program, a minimum GPA of 
2.5, and a minimum test score of 800 on the 
GRE, 450 on the GMAT, and 40 on the MAT 
are required. For further information, consult 
with the Director of the Health Science Program. 

Forthe CriminalJustice program a minimum 
GPA of 2.5 and a minimum test score of either 
900 on the aptitude tests of the GRE or 51 on 
the MAT. For further information consult with 
the Head of the Department of CriminalJustice. 

Degree programs providing teacher certifi- 
cation have other admission requirements, 
including: (1) a recommendation from the 
school in which a student has been employed 
as a teacher or has completed a student 
internship, and (2) eligibility for fourth level cer- 
tification in the field of study. (For further infor- 
mation on admission to certification programs, 
consult the Office of the Dean of Education). 

Provisional Degree Status 
Definition 

Provisional Admission meansthata student 
has applied for admission to a degree program 
and has some condition affecting his status 
such as low grades or test scores. The student 
is admitted to a degree program but must meet 
certain conditions before achieving full gradu- 
ate status (i.e., Regular Admission). 

Requirements 

For Provisional Admission, a student must 
hold a baccalaureate degree and meet the 
other admission requirements of the Graduate 
Program. These requirements include min- 
imum undergraduate grade point averages in 
combination with certain minimum test scores. 

For the M.H.S. and Criminal Justice pro- 
grams, students who fail to meet Regular 
may be granted Provisional Admission if the 
combinations of their GPA and test scores 
conform to the following formulas: 

(GPA X 1 00) + (MAT X 1 0) = 560 or more 
(GPA X 1 00) + (GRE Aptitude) = 1 000 or 

more 
In no case, however, may the GPA be less 



than 2.2, the MAT less than 27, or the GRE less 
than 700. 

For the M.H.S. (and criminal justice pro- 
grams), students who fail to meet Regular 
Admission score requirements may be granted 
Provisional Admission if the combinations of 
their GPA and test scores conform to estab- 
lished formulae. 

For area test scores required by any depart- 
ment, see the appropriate departmental entry. 

Additional Stipulations for 
Provisional Admission 

As with Regular Admission, recommenda- 
tion forms and other aspects of the Admis- 
sions Procedures must be adhered to. 

Provisionally admitted students may be re- 
quired to remove any specific deficiencies that 
are ascertained by taking undergraduate sup- 
porting courses before these students are 
allowed to attempt graduate courses within the 
program to which they have been admitted. 
Students may remain admitted on a provi- 
sional basis until they have attempted 15 
hours of approved graduate work. If they satis- 
factorily complete the initial, approved 15 
hours of graduate work with no grade less than 
a "B"— of which 10 hours must be in the pro- 
fessional sequence— and submit the appro- 
priate Area test score, if required, these stu- 
dents may submit a written request to move 
into Regular status. 

Upon satisfying the Area test score, if re- 
quired, and upon completing 25 hours o 
approved course work with a "B" average oi 
better, of which 1 5 hours must be in the majo 
field of study, any provisionally admitted stu 
dent will be eligible for Regular status. If the 
student does not have a "B" average or bette 
upon completing these 25 hours of course 
work, he or she will be dropped as a degree 
seeking student and prohibited from enrollinc 
in further graduate courses. 

Post Baccalaureate and 
Post Graduate— Non-degree 
Status 

Post Baccalaureate and Post Graduate ad 
mission are provided for those students wh 
may not wish to pursue a graduate degree 
including teachers whose main purpose is t 
obtain credits necessary for teacher certifica 
tion and/or for students who may desire t 



GRADUATE ADMISSIONS 



165 



enter a degree program but who have missing 
data Requirements for Post Baccalaureate 
Admission include documentary evidence of a 
baccalaureate degree and submission of nec- 
essary application papers. The student must 
also have to meet specific prerequisites to 
enroll in courses in certain departments. Post 
Graduate Admission requirements are the 
same except that a graduate degree is required. 
No more than fifteen graduate hours earned 
while enrolled as a Post Graduate or Post 
Baccalaureate student may be applied toward 
a master's degree. 

A student admitted on non-degree status 
who wishes to be advanced to a degree status 
category of admission bears the responsibility 
for: 
1 Meeting all requirements for degree status 

which are in effect at the time the student 

submits the required data and documents 

for degree status. 
2. Notifying the appropriate Dean in writing of 

the intent and desire to advance to degree 

status. 

Action by the Dean to advance a non- 
degree student to a degree status category is 
contingent on the student meeting the above 
responsibilities, and the student is cautioned 
to maintain a careful check on his or her 
status. 

Transient Students Entering 
Armstrong 

Transient students must arrange to have 
written authorization sent to the appropriate 
Dean from their dean, department head, or 
registrar at the graduate school in which they 
are enrolled in order to be accepted as a tran- 
sient student and to register in the Graduate 
Program. They must also submit the applica- 
tion for admission form and the $10 fee as 
described inthe Admission Procedures. If they 
wish to become degree-seeking students, 
they must request appropriate admission in 
writing and must submit the necessary docu- 
ments. 

Readmission 

Any student in the Graduate Program who 
did not matriculate (i.e., register) during the 
quarter immediately preceding the quarter in 



which he next intends to matriculate must pro- 
cess a readmission form with the Registrars 
Office The only students exempted from this 
requirement are those students who are initially 
admitted for graduate study in the quarter 
immediately preceding the quarter of their first 
matriculation. For further information, inquire 
at the Office of the Registrar 



Procedures 

All admission documents should be sent to 
the Graduate Admissions Office. These include 
the application and the ten dollar fee. Tran- 
scripts should reach the Graduate Admissions 
Office twenty days prior to registration. 

The following materials and procedures are 
part of the requirements for admission to the 
Graduate Program. 

1 . The application-for-admission form, avail- 
able in the offices of the Deans, must be 
completed and submitted. Required of all 
applicants twenty days prior to registration. 

2. Two official transcripts showing all college 
credits earned forthe undergraduate degree 
should be sent directly from the college 
which awarded the degree to the appro- 
priate Dean's office. Required of all appli- 
cants except transient students who may 
submit letter of authorization from their 
graduate school twenty days prior to regis- 
tration. 

3. Test scores, as appropriate and as required 
forthe major, must be submitted. Required 
of degree-seeking students only. 

4. Completed recommendation forms must 
be submitted; these forms are available in 
the appropriate Dean's office. For appli- 
cants entering teacher certification pro- 
grams, at least one recommendation must 
be from supervisory personnel who ob- 
served the student in a teaching internship 
or as an employed teacher. These recom- 
mendations are required of degree-seeking 
students only. 

5. A ten dollar application fee is required of all 
students, except graduates of Savannah 
State College and Armstrong State College. 

Admission to graduate study does not imply 
automatic acceptance of the student as a 
candidate for any Master's degree. See sec- 
tion on candidacy for degree. 



166 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Requirements for Admission 
to Specific Programs 

Criminal Justice (M.S.) 

While an undergraduate degree in criminal 
justice is not a prerequisite to admission, it is 
essential that each student pursuing the M.S. 
in Criminal Justice have adequate prepara- 
tion. Therefore, students who lack the neces- 
sary background may be required to complete 
additional undergraduate coursework. 

Students entering the M.S. in Criminal Jus- 
tice Program must meet the general require- 
ments of the College and the following: 

For Regular Admission— Students must 
have earned a minimum of 2.5 undergraduate 
grade point average on all work attempted dur- 
ing the last 90 quarter hours (or 60 semester 
hours), and must present a minimum score of 
either 

(a) 900 on the Aptitude Test of the Grad- 
uate Record Examination (GRE), or 

(b) 51 on the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). 
For Provisional Admission — If students 

fail to meet either the minimum undergraduate 
grade point average or entrance test require- 
ments for Regular admission they may be 
considered for Provisional admission if either 

(a) the undergraduate grade point aver- 
age (last 90/60 hours) multiplied by 
100 and added to the score on the 
Aptitude Test of the GRE equals 
1050, or 

(b) the undergraduate grade point aver- 
age (last 90/60 hours) multiplied by 
100 and added to the Miller Analo- 
gies Test (MAT) score multiplied by 
10 equals 650. 

In no event may the undergraduate grade 
point average (last 90/60 hours) be less than 
2.2, the score on the Aptitude Test of the GRE 
be less than 750, or the score on the Miller 
Analogies Test be less than 37. 

Education (MEd) 

Students entering the early elementary, mid- 
dle school, physical, secondary and the spe- 
cial education programs must satisfy all gen- 
eral admission requirements of the Graduate 
Program. Students In MEd certification pro- 
grams in early elementary, middle school, 
physical education, secondary education, and 
speech and language pathology must also be 



eligible for fourth level (NT4) certification in the 
intended master's level teaching field. 

Business Education (MEd) 

Students entering the MEd program in Busi- 
ness Education must meet the general admis- 
sion requirements of the Graduate Program 
and must take and make a minimum score ol 
560 on the Business Education Area Examina- 
tion of the National Teacher Examinations 
(NTE). Students maybe provisionally admitted 
to the program if their Business Education 
Area Examination of the NTE is not less than 
540. 

Science Education (MEd) 

Students entering the MEd program in Sci- 
ence Education must meet the general admis- 
sion requirements of the Graduate Program 
and must take the Science Education area 
examination of the National Teacher Examina- 
tions (NTE) in order to qualify for degree- 
seeking status. 



English (MEd) 



All students entering the MEd program in 
English must present, in addition to the general 
requirements, the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion Advanced Test in Literature and English 
although no minimum score is prescribed. 

Health Science (MHS) 

Students entering the MHS program musl 
meet the general admission requirements ol 
the Graduate Program and must score 800 on 
the Graduate Record Exam or 450 on the 
Graduate Management Admission Test or 40 
on the Miller Analogies Test. 

History and Political Science 
(MEd) 

Students entering the MEd program in his- 
tory or in political science must satisfy all gen- 
eral admission requirements of the Graduate 
Program, including the requirement that the 
GRE Aptitude or NTE Common, and an appro- 
priate advanced or area test, be completec 
prior to full admission. The results of these 
examinations will then serve as a basis foi 
academic advisement. 

Students must also satisfy a prerequisite ol 
1 5 quarter hours of undergraduate work in the 



GRADUATE ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



167 



major discipline before any course in that dis- 
cipline can be taken for graduate credit. 

Besides the general admission requirenn -fits 
of the Graduate Program, students who desire 
to obtain an MEd in history of political science 
without certification are required to take the 
GRE area test in history or political science 
and obtain a minimum score of 450 in history 
or 410 in political science to gain full admis- 
sion to the program. (Regular Admission sta- 
tus) A student who does not meet the min- 
imum score on the area examination will be 
required to take two recommended under- 
graduate courses on the 300 or 400 level and 
pass them with at least B's before being 
granted regular status. 

Mathematics (MEd) 

All students entering the MEd program in 
mathematics must satisfy all general admis- 
sion requirements of the Graduate Program, 
must take the NTE area test in Mathematics or 
the GRE advanced mathematics test, and 
must satisfy a prerequisite of 25 quarter hours 
of college mathematics at or beyond the level 
of calculus, in order to obtain degree-seeking 
status. 

To gain Regular Admission, a student must 
obtain a minimum score of 580 on the NTE 
area test or 520 on the GRE advanced test. No 
minimum is required for Provisional Admis- 
sion. Students whose scores on the NTE area 
test or the GRE advanced test are too low for 
Regular Admission can also gain Regular 
Admission by passing a department entrance 
examination. 

In order for a Provisionally Admitted student 
to gain Regular Status without passing the 
departmental entrance examination, the stu- 
dent must satisfy the general requirements of 
the Graduate School; including the stipulation 
that the first 25 graduate hours must be com- 
pleted with at least a "B" average, and that at 
least 15 of these hours must be in approved 
mathematics courses. 



ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 

Student Responsibility 

The student is charged with the responsibil- 
ity for taking the initiative in meeting all aca- 



demic requirements and in maintaining a care- 
ful check on progress toward earning a de<; 
The student is responsible for discharging 
obligations to the business office and the 
library and for adhering to the rules and regula- 
tions appertaining to graduate students in par- 
ticular and to all students enrolled in a unit of 
the University System of Georgia It is the stu- 
dent's responsibility to abide by catalog require- 
ments. A student's claim that he or she has 
been granted an exception to these require- 
ments must be documented before the merits 
of the claim can be evaluated. 

Academic Advisement 

Upon admission to graduate study, each 
student will be referred to a departmental 
office for advisor assignment. Consultation 
with the assigned advisor is required prior to 
registration. Each student must process appro- 
priate advisement papers which are available 
from his or her assigned advisor and which 
provide the advisor clearance required for 
registration. 

Transient students report to the Office of the 
appropriate Dean (Education or Human Servi- 
ces) for advisement and advisor clearance. 

Post Baccalaureate and Post Graduate stu- 
dents obtain advisor clearance by processing 
the non-degree advisement form with their 
assigned advisors. During the quarter in which 
a Post Baccalaureate student achieves degree- 
seeking status, he or she must process the 
Program of Study form. 

Degree-seeking students, both Regularand 
Provisional Admission students, must process 
the Program of Study form with their assigned 
advisor no later than the end of their first quar- 
ter of enrollment. A temporary advisor clear- 
ance statement may be provided by the advi- 
sor which will be valid only for the student's 
initial registration. This temporary clearance 
should be processed on non-degree advise- 
ment form, with appropriate notations made to 
indicate that it is temporary. 

The Program of Study shows the essential 
courses the student will take, transfer courses 
that might apply to the degree, and prerequi- 
site courses or other prerequisites. The Pro- 
gram of Study must be followed by the student 
in fulfilling degree requirements. However, the 
student can take courses additional to those 
on his Program of Study and may enroll in the 
courses on the Program of Study during quar- 
ters otherthan those which might be shown on 
his Program of Study form. Moreover, the stu- 



168 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



dent may officially modify his Program of Study 
with the concurrence of his advisor and depart- 
ment head. 

Students should note that any departure 
from the catalog requirements for a degree 
must be approved by the appropriate dean. 

Foreign Student Advisement 

Specialized advisement is available for for- 
eign students from the Graduate Foreign Stu- 
dent Advisor, Dr. William Easterling, located in 
room 108-A, Gamble Hall. 

Registration 

Before a student may register for graduate 
courses, the individual must be formally admit- 
ted as a graduate student (although some 500 
and 600 level courses may be taken by quali- 
fied undergraduate seniors upon complying 
with requirements and procedures stipulated 
by and available in the Deans' Offices). If cir- 
cumstances require it, the student must be 
readmitted (see section on Admissions, para- 
graph on Readmissions). In order to register, a 
student will be required to show at registration 
a permit to register card, which must be signed 
by the advisor. 

Transfer of Credits 

Credit may be transferred from another insti- 
tution, provided: 

1 . that only up to 1 5 hours of graduate credit 
taken while in a non-degree status may be 
applied to a degree program. 

2. that each course equates with a course in 
the curriculum of the Graduate Program or 
is an acceptable elective. 

3. that the credit was earned in an accredited 
graduate program. 

4. that a grade of B or better was earned in 
each course. 

5. that the credit was earned no more than six 
years prior to completion of all degree 
requirements. 

6. that no more than fifty percent of the 
required credits shall be transferred for use 
towards a master's degree (i.e., no more 
than 50% of either the required professional 
education credits or other credits in the 
master's programs). 

Information about the amount of credit trans- 
ferable for a particular degree program, can be 
located in the appropriate departmental entry. 



Procedures for Processing 
Transfer Credits 

Requests by students to receive transfer 
graduate credit must be supported by two 
copies of the graduate transcript showing the 
credits requested. The formal and final requests 
for receiving transfer credit is part of the Appli- 
cation for Candidacy which the student must 
process upon the completion of 25 hours of 
graduate work. This application is obtained in 
the Graduate Office. The two graduate tran- 
scripts should be sent to the office of the 
appropriate Dean. 

Advisement on transfer of credit is routinely 
provided on the Program of Study form which 
every degree-seeking student must complete 
with his advisor in the first quarter of enroll- 
ment. Formal approval of transfer credit is 
granted via the student's Application for Can- 
didacy which requires approval by the stu- 
dent's advisor, Department Head, and appro- 
priate dean. 

Prospective students may write to the Depart- 
ment Coordinator in their area of study to 
obtain advisement on transfer of credit. 

Reports and Grades 

In the Graduate Program grades assigned 
are A, B, C, D, F, (failure), I (incomplete), W 
(withdrew with no penalty), and WF (withdrew 
failing). The grade of W does not enter into 
computing a student's grade point average. 

Stipulations applicable to symbols used in I 
the Graduate Program include: 

I— incomplete. May be awarded (only in 
emergency cases) by an instructor, who will 
also stipulate the conditions for its removal. A 
grade of I must be removed by completing the 
course by midterm of the following quarter or it 
becomes an automatic F. 

W— withdrawal without penalty. May be 
awarded by an instructor up to the mid-quarter 
period in a course. Regents' policy stipulates 
that "Withdrawals without penalty will not be 
permitted after the mid-point of the total grad- 
ing period (including final examinations) except 
in cases of hardship as determined by the 
appropriate official of the respective institu- 
tion." Withdrawals after mid-term require ap- 
proval of the Graduate Dean. 

WF— withdrew failing. May be awarded by 
an instructor anytime that a student withdraws 
from a course afterthe drop/add period; man- 



GRADUATE ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 169 



datory after midquarter except for hardship 
cases as stipulated above for grades of W 

V— audit Use of this symbol is subject to the 
discretion of the individual graduate depart- 
ments, and the departments may require that a 
student receive the permission of the instruc- 
tor to audit a course prior to registering for the 
course. Moreover, an auditing student must 
pay the usual fees, must register for the 
course, and may not transfer from audit to 
credit status (or vice versa). 

S and U — satisfactory and unsatisfactory; 
see above. Specific courses receiving these 
grades are identified in departmental course 
listings. Comprehensive examinations are 
given these grades also. 

K — credit by examination. Use of this sym- 
bol is subject to the discretion of the individual 
I graduate departments. 

Students expecting to receive grades of V or 
K must insure that they are enrolled in an 
appropriate course or activity for which V or K 
grades are awarded by the appropriate depart- 
ment. If this catalog does not show in the 
departmental entries that the given depart- 
ments have authorized the use of V or K, then a 
student expecting to receive a V in a course 
should obtain written verification from the 
appropriate instructor prior to registering for 
, the course that V will be awarded. 

Grade point averages are calculated on all 
graduate work attempted, and no credits with a 
• grade below C may apply toward a degree. 

Course Eligibility 

Courses numbered 500 through 699 are 
open to qualified Undergraduate seniors, with 
approval of their respective department heads, 
and to graduate students. In such courses, the 
quantity and quality of the work required of the 
graduate students will be on the same level as 
that required in those courses offered exclu- 
sively for graduate students. Courses num- 
bered 700 and above are open only to gradu- 
ate students. Candidates for degrees must 
take at least fifty percent of their courses at the 
700 level. 

Academic Probation and 
Standing 

Any student who falls below a 3.0 (B) aver- 
age shall be on academic probation. 

Any student in a degree program on Regular 
Admission status who does not achieve a 3.0 



graduate cumulative GPA after completing 25 
or more graduate hours shall be placed on 
Academic Probation and must achieve a 3 
graduate GPA in order to return to Regular 
Admission status Any student on Academic 
Probation who earns less than a B in any 
course or who accumulates 75 hours while on 
Academic Probation shall be dropped as a 
degree seeking student and shall be placed on 
permanent non-degree status 

Any student on Provisional Admission sta- 
tus who does not achieve a 30 graduate 
cumulative GPA upon completing 25 graduate 
hours shall be dropped as a degree seeking 
student and shall be placed on permanent 
non-degree status. 

Any student on Post Baccalaureate status 
who does not achieve a 3.0 graduate cumula- 
tive GPA shall be placed on Academic Proba- 
tion. 

Any student whose graduate cumulative 
GPA falls below 2.5 after completing 25 or 
more hours shall be prohibited from taking 
further graduate work. 

Course Load Limitation 

A graduate student may not carry more than 
15 hours per quarter. Exceptions must be 
approved in writing by the advisor. Students on 
academic probation or on Provisional Admis- 
sions status should carefully plan their course 
loads in consultation with their advisors. 

Withdrawing; Dropping, 
Adding Courses 

Withdrawal is, in the technical sense, drop- 
ping all courses and processing a formal with- 
drawal from the College. A student may with- 
draw from school (or drop a single course) at 
any time during the quarter. Only by formally 
withdrawing, however, can a student become 
eligible for the refund of fees as explained in 
the section on fees. The student bears the 
responsibility of contacting the graduate office 
to effect a withdrawal and of contacting his 
professor(s) to determine what grade(s) will 
be assigned (W or WF). 

Dropping a course should be formalized 
through the Office of the Registrar which will 
process a drop/add slip. If a student is taking 
only one course, the drop is, technically, a 
withdrawal and should be treated as such. 

Adding a course may be accomplished 
through the Office of the Registrar which will 



170 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



process a drop/add slip. Courses may be 
added only during the late registration days at 
the beginning of the quarter and not at any 
other time during the quarter. The student 
must pay the appropriate fee for the additional 
course, unless a course equivalent in credit 
hours is being dropped simultaneously. 

Administrative With- 
drawals 

The College reserves the right to effect the 
withdrawal of any student at any time during a 
course of studies if the student does not meet 
financial obligations or the required standards 
of scholarship, or if he fails in any way to meet 
the standards of the Graduate Program. 

CATES Courses 

Armstrong State College participates in the 
Coastal Area Teacher Education Service, a 
consortium of area public school systems and 
institutions of the University System of Georgia 
offering graduate and undergraduate courses 
in teacher education. 

A student who wishes to apply CATES 
course credit to his degree program must 
obtain approval from his advisor to take a 
course for degree credit prior to taking the 
course. Without this prior approval, the course 
is subject to being treated as a transfer course, 
in which case, the Transfer of Graduate Cred- 
its policies and procedures described in the 
catalog will be followed. 

Honor Code 

The Honor Code, published in the under- 
graduate section of this catalog, applies to 
graduate students as well as undergraduate 
students. All students, graduate and under- 
graduate, must agree to abide by the rules of 
the code. 



former students from either Armstrong State 
College or Savannah State College. The accep- 
tance of the application fee does not constitute 
acceptance of the student into the graduate 
program. This fee, which is paid at Armstrong 
State College, is not refundable. 



Matriculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students register 
mg on campus for the normal course load o 
fifteen hours is $247.00. Students carryini 
fewer than 12 credit hours on campus in i 
quarter will pay at the rate of $21 .00 per quar 
ter hour in Matriculation Fees. Students whc 
register for off-campus credit hours will pay a 
the rate of $26.00 per credit hour. Matnculatioi 
fees are waived for residents of Georgia upor 
presentation of written documentation tha 
they are 62 years of age or older. 



Out-of-State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee o 
$495.00 per quarter in addition to all regula 
fees. Students carrying fewer than 12 credi 
hours in a quarter who are not legal resident! 
of the State of Georgia will pay at the rate o 
$41.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee ii 
addition to regular fees. Students who registe 
for off-campus credit courses will pay at the 
rate of $41.00 per quarter hour Out-of-Stati 
Fee in addition to all regular fees. Out-of-Statf 
tuition fees are waived for active duty military 
personnel and their dependents stationed ir 
Georgia and on active duty, except militan 
personnel assigned to this institution for edu 
cational purposes. 



Application 



An application fee of $1 0.00 is paid by each 
graduate student at the time of initial applica- 
tion for admission. This fee is not required of 



Residency Requirements 

The University System of Georgia residency 
requirements as they pertain to undergraduate 
and graduate students are published in the 
undergraduate section of this catalog. Pleas* 
consult the index for the proper reference. 



GRADUATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



171 



Student Activity and Health/ 
Service 

Athletic 

Identification Card 

Late Registration 

Graduation 

Transcript 

All preceding fee categories listed are the 
same for graduate students as they are for 
undergraduate students. Please consult the 
index for the proper references 

Refunds 

Financial Obligations 

Notice of Fee Changes 

All preceding policy categories listed are the 
same for graduate students as they are for 
undergraduate students. Please consult the 
index for proper references. 



Financial Aid 

Students are invited to contact the Office of 
Financial Aid at the College for information on 
federal and state programs of financial assist- 
ance to college students. 



Veterans Benefits 

Information of interest to veterans can be 
obtained by writing or calling the Office of 
Veterans Affairs at Armstrong State College. 

Once accepted into the graduate program, 
a veteran should contact the Veterans' Office 
for processing instructions. Since processing 
time varies, a first quarter student should 
expect a four to six week delay in receiving the 
first benefit check. First quarter student veter- 
ans should consider this delay when making 
financial arrangements to attend school. 

For purposes of G.I. Bill benefits, ten quarter 
hours is considered to be a full load. A load of 
five graduate quarter hours entitles the gradu- 
ate student to half-time benefits. 



DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 



Time Limitation 

Students working toward a master's degree 
must complete all requirements for the degree 
within a period of not more than six years from 
the date of first enrollment. Extension of time 
may be granted upon recommendation of the 
student's major department, but only in cases 
of unusual circumstances. 

Course and Residence 
Requirements 

Satisfactory completion of at least sixty 
quarter hours of graduate credit, thirty of which 
must be earned in residence, is necessary for 
all masters degrees. Courses to be counted for 
a degree may be accumulated on a full-time or 
part-time basis. No credits with grades below 
"C" may count toward a degree. At least fifty 
percent of the courses for a degree must be at 
the 700 level or above. 

Students should note that the sixty-hour 
requirement is a minimum requirement. Degree 
students with academic weaknesses should 
recognize that they may have to complete more 
than sixty hours to fulfill all curriculum require- 
ments and comply with all academic regula- 
tions. 

Degree Candidacy 

Upon successful completion of twenty-five 
quarter hours of graduate work taken in resi- 
dence and at least one quarter prior to making 
application for the degree, the student is 
required to file an application for admission to 
candidacy. The student will submit the com- 
pleted application to his advisor. Application 
forms are available in the appropriate Dean's 
or departmental offices. 

Approval of the application will be based 
upon verification that the student: 

1. has been admitted to full graduate status 
(i.e., Regular Admission). 

2. has maintained a minimum of a "B" aver- 
age in all work attempted. 

3. has met any other requirements stipulated 
for his degree program. 



172 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Application for the Degree 

At the time specified on the academic 
calendar, the student must file an application 
for the master's degree with the appropriate 
major department Note that the application for 
the degree must be preceded by the applica- 
tion for candidacy by at least one quarter. 
Application forms are available in the appro- 
priate Dean s or department offices. 

General Requirements for 
the Master's Degree 

General requirements for obtaining a mas- 
ter's degree follows: 

1 . Admission to full graduate status, i.e., Regu- 
lar Admission. 

2 Admission to candidacy for the degree. 

3 Satisfactory completion of at least sixty 
hours of approved graduate level work. 

4. Maintenance of a 3.00 GPA. 

5. Satisfactory completion of a comprehen- 
sive examination or thesis or both. 

6. Completion of an application forthe degree 
at the time specified. 

For the MEd degree, the following require- 
ment applies: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of certification re- 
quirements. (Some MEd programs have 
options for no certification). 

MEd Certification Programs 

Although some MEd degree programs have 
an option for no certification, generally these 
degrees are designed to comply with the 
requirements for teacher certification at the 
fifty year level in the various areas of speciali- 
zation. The degree ordinarily is granted only to 
students who qualify for T-5 certification (or 
equivalent certification for other states), which 
in turn entails meeting T-4 certification require- 
ments (Georgia). Students who use graduate 
credits to meet T-4 certification requirements 
may be required to take graduate courses 
beyond the 60 hours required for the M.Ed, 
degree in order to meet T-5 certification require- 
ments. Since the M.Ed, program requires 60 
hours, which is 1 5 more than the 45 minimum 
required for the T-5 by the State Education 
Department, 1 5 of the 60 graduate hours may 
be used to fulfill T-4 certification requirements. 
However, none of the 15 hours so used can 
then be applied toward meeting the 45 hours 
specified for the T-5. 

Detailed information concerning programs 



and procdures relating to graduate teacher 
certification may be obtained from Education 
Offices. 

MEd Non-Certification 
Programs 

Building on the basic, academic structure of 
the typical MEd degree programs, departments 
may offer MEd programs without applying all of 
the stipulations for certification programs. The 
curriculum essentials of a non-certification 
degree program are: 

1 . At least fifteen hours of education course 
work. 

2. At least twenty-five hours of major area 
course work. 

Such programs do not meet certification 
requirements by the State of Georgia. 

Thirty Hour Plan for a 
Second MEd Degree 

Students who have already earned a mas- 
ter's degree can, under certain circumstan- 
ces, earn a second master's degree in the 
Graduate Program by completing as few as 30 
quarter hours of graduate work in residence. 
Essential elements of the second master's 
degree plan are: 

1 . All general requirements (e.g., Regular Ad- 
mission status, adherence to general aca- 
demic regulations. "B" average, compre- 
hensive examination, etc.) and all specific 
curricular requirements (i.e., departmenta 1 
prerequisitesfor courses, specific courses 
etc.) currently applicable to a master's 
degree will apply to the second degree 
sought, except as explicitly noted as follows 

2. For the Second master's degree: 

A. The student must take at least 30 quar-, 
ter hours in residence additional to course 
work that was used in fulfilling requiren 
ments for a previous master's degree 
Additional hours may be necessary in 
order to fulfill curricular requirements oi 
for such purposes as teacher certifica- 
tion in programs designed as Approvec 
Programs for Georgia State Certification 

B. The 30 (or more) hours in residence 
must meet existing requirements or 
recency of credit. For the other hours' 
(hours applied to both the first degree 
and to the second degree), fifteen hour* 
will have no age limit, but the remaininc 
hours must be no more than twelve 



GRADUATE BIOLOGY 



173 



years old when requirements for the 
second master's degree are completed 
C A curriculum plan for a second degree 
that is consistent with existing catalog 
plans must be prepared by a department 
head or by a graduate advisor with his or 
her department head's endorsement A 
copy of this plan will be sent to the Office 
of the Dean of the School of Education 
and will be given to the student For this 
purpose, current advisement forms, with 
appropriate modifications may be used. 
The plan must show the 30 (or more) 
hours to be taken in residence and the 
previous graduate hours that are to 
apply to the second degree. 

School of Arts and 
Sciences 

Adams, Joseph, Dean 



Biology 

Faculty 

To Be Appointed, Department Head 
Beumer, Ronald 
Guillou, Laurent 
Pingel. Allen 
Thorne, Francis 



The biology MEd program has been deacti- 
vated, but the department continues to present 
. limited graduate course offerings. Students 
should check with the biology department for 
complete information on course offerings. 

OFFERINGS 
Biology Offerings 

BIO 610— Cellular Physiology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: Complete sequence in Organ- 
ic Chemistry and five hours of Physiology. 

A consideration of the functional relation- 
ships between microscopic anatomy and cell 
chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabo- 
; lism, and growth. 

BIO 640-Cytology (2-6-5) 

i! Prerequisite: Two senior division courses in 
: biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and 
(i nuclei, growth, differentiation, and reproduc- 
tion. 



BIO 650— Evolution (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite At least 1 5 quarter hours credit 
in upper division biology (botany or zoology) 
courses 

Modern concepts in organic evolution 

BIO 680— General Ecology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites Three upper division courses 
in biology (botany or zoology) 

A survey of the principles of ecology and 
their application to the welfare of man, coordi- 
nated with a study of populations and com- 
munities in the field. 

Botany Offerings 

BOT 610— Plant Physiology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: BOT 203 and Organic Chem- 
istry. 

A survey of physiological processes occur- 
ring in plants and the conditions which affect 
these processes. 

BOT 625— Plant Morphology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: BOT 203. 

Comparative studies of vascular plants with 
emphasis on form, structure, reproduction, 
and evolutionary relationships. 

BOT 701— Plant Diversity I: Non- 
vascular Plants (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 quarter hours 
credit in botany. 

Morphology, taxonomy, and ecology of the 
algae, fungi, mosses, and liverworts, including 
identification of common species, field and 
laboratory methods, local habitats and sources. 

BOT 702— Plant Diversity II: Vascular 
Plants (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 quarter hours 
credit in botany. 

Morphology, taxonomy, and ecology of the 
primitive vascular plants, ferns, gymnosperms, 
and angiosperms, including field and labora- 
tory methods, local habitats and sources. 

BOT/EDN 793— Botany for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

This course is not suitable for the general 
science major. 

Lecture-laboratory course dealing with princi- 
ples involved in classifying and identifying 
plant life. 

Zoology Offerings 

ZOO 525— Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 
A study of the structure, body functions, 
interrelations, and natural history of the major 



174 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



invertebrate groups. 

ZOO 556— Comparative Anatomy of the 
Vertebrates (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 
A study of the anatomy and evolution of the 
organ systems of the vertebrates. 

ZOO 610— General Vertebrate Physiology 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 204 and Organic Chem- 
istry. 

An introduction to the general physiological 
processes of vertebrates. 

ZOO 625— Marine Invertebrate Zoology 
(2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 325 or permission of 
instructor and department head. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic 
distribution of marine invertebrates as exem- 
plified by collections from the southeastern 
coastal region. 

ZOO 629— Endocrinology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 41 and one other senior 
division course in biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their 
control of metabolism and reproductive cycles. 

ZOO 635— Comparative Physiology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 204 and Organic 
Chemistry. 

Studies in various groups of animals of the 
functions or organ systems involved in the 
maintenance of homeostasis under varying 
conditions within normal habitats and of in vitro 
reactions of tissues and systems under labora- 
tory conditions. 

ZOO 710— Applied Human Physiology 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing plus a 
course in human, general, or vertebrate physi- 
ology, and organic or biological chemistry. 

A consideration of human physiological 
responses to normal and abnormal stressors 
of the external and internal environment, includ- 
ing local and systemic adaptations to stres- 
sors. Specific malfunctions and adjustments 
will be treated where feasible and appropriate. 

Laboratory sessions will feature the empiri- 
cal demonstration of physiologic concepts 
and their applications to human function, large- 
ly through controlled experimentation. 

The lecture may be taken in conjunction 
with Nursing 605 lab for credit in Nursing 605. 
That lab will share some common sessions 
with ZOO 710. 



ZOO 721— Animal Diversity I: Invertebrates 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 quarter hours 
credit in zoology 

Structure, function, and ecologic relation- 
ships of the major invertebrate phyla. (Not 
open to students with credits in invertebrate 
zoology). 

ZOO 722— Animal Diversity II: Vertebrates 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 quarter hours 
credit in zoology. 

Structure, function, and ecologic relation- 
ships of the vertebrates, with emphasis on 
amphibious and terrestrial forms. 

ZOO 731— Ecological Associations (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 25 quarter hours 
credit in junior-senior level courses in biology. 

Environmental relationships among and be- 
tween groups of organisms and their environ- 
ments. 

ZOO/EDN 792— Zoology for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

This course is not suitable for general sci- 
ence majors. 

Modern approaches to teaching the biologi- 
cal sciences. Emphasis on understanding of 
life processes in the animal kingdom. 

Courses at Marine Science Center 

The following courses are offered at the 
Marine Science Center on Skidaway Island 
and are open to both graduate and undergrad- 
uate students. These courses are cooperative- 
ly sponsored by Armstrong State College, 
Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State 
University, Georgia Southern College, and the 
University of Georgia. 

BIO 630— Estuarine Ecology (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks). Prerequisites: CHE 
128, 129; ZOO 204; two courses in biology 
numbered 300 or above; or permission of 
instructor. MAT 104 recommended. 

The evolution and development of estuar- 
ies, substrates, physical processes, communi- 
ties, ecosystem functions, ecosystem dynam- 
ics and analysis. The study area will include 
the estuarine complex of the Carolinian prov- 
ince as exemplified along the coast of Georgia. 

ZOO 605— Ichthyology (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks). Prerequisites: ZOO 
204 and one course in zoology numbered 300 
or above, or permission of instructor. 



GRADUATE CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 175 



The taxonomy, distribution, ecology, and 
evolution of fishes with special reference to 
the fishes of eastern North America. 



Chemistry and Physics 

Faculty 

Harris, Henry, Department Head 
Brewer, John 
Robbms, Paul 
Stratton, Cednc 
Whiten, Morris 



The chemistry MEd program has been de- 
activated, but the department continues to 
offer limited graduate course offerings. Stu- 
dents should check with the chemistry depart- 
ment for complete information on course offer- 
ings 

OFFERINGS 
Chemistry Offerings 

CHE 501 —Chemistry of Life (5-0-5) 

An introductory course covering selected 
areas of applied biochemistry. This course is 
not recommended for chemistry, biology, or 
premedical students. 

CHE 541-542— Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

These courses include the study of aliphat- 

cs, aromatic hydrocarbons and their deriva- 

.ives, polyfunctional compounds, and polynu- 

olear hydrocarbons. Organic reactions are 

emphasized in terms of modern theory. 

:HE 543— Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

A continuation of the organic chemistry 
sequence 541, 542. This course completes 
he fundamental study of organic chemistry 
vith a consideration of carbohydrates, amino 
icids, and heterocyclics with their related 
: :ompounds. 

:HE 580— Quantitative Instrumental 
2-9-5) 

A study of the principles of gravimetric, 
. 'Olumetric, spectrophotometric, and electro- 
> netric methods of analysis. The laboratory will 
jl )rovide practice in techniques and application 
j >f these principles. 

:HE 600— Introduction to Chemical 
J lesearch (2-0-2) 

iG This course outlines systematic methods of 
terature research and preparation research 
utlines from reference to original articles. 



CHE 622— Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3) 

Modern theory of structures and bonding, 
acid-base theories, and properties of some 
rare elements and unusual compounds will be 
detailed The latter includes nonstoichion i 
compounds, rare gas compounds, and coor- 
dination complexes 

CHE 641— Organic Chemistry (3-0-3) 

Basic organic chemistry to include struc- 
tures, reactions, and reaction mechanisms 

CHE 651— History of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

The development of science surveyed from 
antiquity to the present. Emphasis is placed on 
the development of ideas, men who made sig- 
nificant contributions, evolution of chemical 
theories and the modern social implications of 
science. 

CHE 661— Biochemistry I (4-0-4) 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular 
constituents and cellular metabolism. Subject 
topics include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, 
enzymes, vitamins and coenzymes, anaerobic 
carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, 
the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phos- 
phorylation, and photosynthesis. 

CHE 662— Biochemistry II (4-0-4) 

A study of the metabolism of ammonia and 
nitrogen-containing compounds, the biosyn- 
thesis of nucleic acids and proteins, metabolic 
regulation, and selected topics. 

CHE 663— Clinical Chemistry (4-3-5) 

A study of the principles of chemistry ap- 
plied in the clinical laboratory. Topic subjects to 
include instrumentation and microtechniques 

CHE 681— Advanced Instrumental I (1-3-2) 

A study of electrometric methods of analy- 
sis. Topic subjects will include potentiometric, 
coulometric, and polarographic measurements. 

CHE 682— Advanced Instrumental II 
(1-3-2) 

A study of spectrophotometric and chroma- 
tographic methods analysis. Topic subjects 
will include visible and ultraviolet, spectros- 
copy, gas-liquid chromatography, high per- 
formance liquid chromatography, flame emis- 
sion and atomic absorption spectroscopy. 

CHE 683— Advanced Instrumental III 
(1-3-2) 

A continuation of the study of spectroscopy. 
Topic subjects will include infrared spectros- 
copy, nuclear magnetic resonance, eiectron- 
spin resonance and mass spectrometry. 



176 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CHE 691-692-693— Physical Chemistry 
(4-3-5) 

Fundamental principles of physical chemis- 
try including the study of solids, liquids, gases, 
thermochemistry, thermodynamics and solu- 
tions These courses will also cover a study of 
chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, elec- 
trochemistry, colloids, quantum mechanics 
and nuclear chemistry. 

CHE 721— Chemistry for High School 
Teachers (4-3-5) 

This course covers CHEM study material 
and also Chemical Bonding. Approach mate- 
rial for high school teachers. 

CHE 731— Development of Chemical 
Theories (3-0-3) 

A study of the basic principles upon which 
well known chemical theories are founded. 
Topics such as the kinetic molecular theory, 
chemical equilibria, and spectroscopy will be 
discussed. 

CHE 794— Chemistry for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

A study of the more important metallic and 
non-metallic elements with emphasis on prac- 
tical application at the elementary school 
level. 

CHE 798— Seminar (2-0-2) 

Discussion of selected topics. 

Physical Science Offerings 

AST 601— Astronomy for Teachers (5-0-5) 

Topic subjects will include the solar system, 
stellar evolution, stars and star systems, and 
methods in astronomy. 

GEL 601— Geology for Teachers (5-0-5) 

A survey of physical and historical geology. 
Topic subjects will include a geologic history, 
plate tectonics, and identification of minerals 
and rocks. 

MET 601— Meteorology for Teachers 
(5-0-5) 

A study of the atmosphere, weather, and 
climate. 

OCE 601— Oceanography for Teachers 
(5-0-5) 

Topic subjects will include origin and struc- 
ture of ocean floors, tides and currents, chem- 
ical and physical properties of sea water, and 
applications of oceanographic research. 

PHS 795— Earth Science for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

Study of the compositions of earth, classifi- 



cation and identification of rocks and minerals 
in a format appropriate for teachers of elemen- 
tary age chidlren. 

PHS 701— Principles of Astronomy, Geol- 
ogy and Meteorology (5-0-5) 

A study of unifying principles associatec 
with the disciplines of astronomy, geology anc 
meteorology. Emphasis will be placed on mate- 
rials, demonstrations and testing associatec 
with the physical sciences. 

Physics Offerings 

PHY 602— Physics for Secondary School 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

A study of the principles of physics appro 
priate for teachers of physics and physica 
science. National curricula such as the Har 
vard Project Physics and PSSC will be studied 

PHY 603— Physics Laboratory for Science 
Teachers (3-4-5) 

A study of the theory and practice of selectee 
laboratory exercises and demonstrations. 

PHY 612— Electronic Measurements 
(3-6-5) 

Introduction to circuit theory and digital /an 
alog electronics dealing with measurements 
control concepts, and instruments. 

Course at Marine Science Center 

The following course is offered at the Marin- 
Science Center on Skidaway Island and i 
open to both graduate and undergraduate stu 
dents. This course is cooperatively spor 
sored by Armstrong State College, Georgi 
Institute of Technology, Georgia State Univer' 
sity, Georgia Southern College, and the Un 
versify of Georgia. 

OCE 630— Applied Oceanography (6-4-5] 

Prerequisites: General Chemistry and Ger 
eral Biology. Offered Summers. 

The aspects of physical, chemical, and bic 
logical sciences which are marine oriented a 
applied to specific problems in the ocean an 
its environs. Collection and interpretation ( 
field data stressed utilizing vessels and equip 
ment of the Skidaway Institute of Ocear 
ography. 



History and Political Scienc 

Faculty 

Warlick, Roger, Department Head 
Arens. Olavi 
Babits. Lawrence 



GRADUATE HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



177 



Coyle, William 
Duncan, John 
Ealy. Steven 
Gross. Jimmie 
Lanier, Osmos 
McCarthy, John 
Newman. John 
Patterson, Robert 
Pruden. George 
Rhee, Steve 
Stone. Janet 



Objectives 

The purpose of the graduate programs in 
History and Political Science is, first and fore- 
most, to increase the academic and profes- 
sional skills, competence, and enthusiasm of 
secondary teachers in their special fields and 
in the social studies generally. 

In the broadest sense, it is our goal to pro- 
vide continuing intellectual enrichment to 
mature adults of diverse interests, whose 
desire for learning has not ceased and for 
whom any degree marks but a stage in a con- 
tinuing process of personal growth. 

Advisement 

Shortly after admission to the program in 
either history or political science, each student 
should contact the department head to secure 
an advisor. As soon as notified of the assigned 
advisor, the student should arrange for a con- 
ference and begin planning a degree program. 
Failure by the student to consult regularly with 
the advisor may greatly lengthen the time 
necessary to complete the program. 

Transfer of Courses 

Students who have earned graduate credits 
at one or more accredited institutions may, 
under certain circumstances, transfera limited 
number of quarter hours of such credits to be 
applied toward the MEd degree programs in 
history and political science. Such transfer of 
credits is handled on an individual basis and 
requires the written approval of the student's 
advisor and the Department Head. In any 
case, no more than ten hours credit will be 
considered for transfer into the major field. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Satisfactory performance on comprehen- 
sive examinations, both written and oral, will be 
required of all degree candidates. Candidates 
should notify their major professor and the 
department head of their readiness to be 



examined at the time they apply for the de- 
gree— i e , no later than mid-term of their i 
to-final quarter At this time the department 
head, in consultation with the student, will 
determine the examining committee of three 
faculty members, including the designated 
chairman Following the department head s 
receiving of consent to serve from the commit- 
tee members, the candidate will then approach 
them for requirements, including reading lists, 
etc. The Committee Chairman in consultation 
with the committee members and candidate, 
will determine the places, dates, and times of 
the written examinations, and of the oral exam 
The examinations normally occur before mid- 
term of the student's final quarter. 

The department head will notify the student 
regarding the result of the examinations. The 
examination papers and/or comments of the 
examining committee will become part of the 
student's permanent file in the Department, 
and the student may request a conference 
with the major professor and advisors for the 
purpose of reviewing the examination papers. 
In the event the candidate fails any part of the 
comprehensive examination the department 
reserves the right to require the student to take 
additional courses in areas of weakness, before 
re-examination. 

A student may repeat the Comprehensive 
Examinations as many times as necessary to 
demonstrate the required level of competence. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION WITH A 
MAJOR IN HISTORY (with T-5 certification) 

This program applies to students who already 
hold a T-4 Certificate in an appropriate field. 

Hours 

A. History Courses (including at least 
fifteen hours at the 700 level 30 

B. Professional Education Courses .... 20 

1. EDN721 or 722 5 

2. EDN 731,741,771 15 

C. Approved Electives 1_0 

TOTAL 60 
Special Note: An appropriate course in 
Exceptional Children (e.g., EXC 622) must be 
taken if not taken previously). 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION WITH A 
MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
(with T-5 certification) 

This program applies to students who already 
hold a T-4 Certificate in an appropriate field. 



178 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Hours 

A Political Science Courses (including 
at least fifteen hours at the 700 level 
and one course from each of the 

areas: 30 

1 American government and 
public policy 

2. International relations and 
foreign policy 

3. Political Theory 

4. Comparative politics 

B Professional Education Courses 20 

1 EDN 721 or 722 5 

2 EDN 731, 741, 771 15 

C Approved Electives 1_0 

TOTAL 60 
Special Note: An appropriate course in 
Exceptional Children (e.g., EXC 622) must be 
taken if not taken previously). 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION WITH A 
MAJOR IN HISTORY (with T-5 certifi- 
cation) 

This program applies to students who do not 
hold T-4 Certification. 

Hours 

A. History Courses 30 

B. Professional Education Courses .... 40 

1. EDN 711, 722, 731, 741, 771 
plus one 25-30 

2. Student teaching or equivalent 
experience 10-15 

3. Electives _5 

TOTAL 70-80 
Special Note: The flexibility provided by the 
hours of "Approved Electives" normally makes 
it possible to meet the other program guide- 
lines within a 60-hour total. But, students 
should be aware, for example, that counting 
both graduate and undergraduate classwork, 
they are required to have a total of at least 30 
hours in their majors teaching area (i.e., Amer- 
ican or European History, or American Govern- 
ment in the case of Political Science majors). 
There may also be areas where undergradu- 
ate preparation was weak or unavailable, such 
as professional education, non-western tradi- 
tions, etc. Such problems can best be solved 
on an individual basis with the help of the 
faculty advisor. 

Students should be aware that regardless of 
their major, state certification criteria recom- 
mend that social studies teachers include in 
their program preparation in the following: 



American history and government, conflicting 
ideologies, the modern world, Western herit- 
age, and non-Western traditions. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION WITH A 
MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
(with T-5 certification) 

This program applies to students who do not 
hold T-4 Certification. 

Hours 

A. Political Science Courses 30 

B. Professional Education Courses .... 40 

1. EDN 711, 722, 731, 741, 771 

plus one 25-30 

2. Student teaching or 

equivalent 10-15 

3. Electives _5 

TOTAL 70-80 
Special Note: The flexibility provided by the 
hours of "Approved Electives" normally makes 
it possible to meet the other program guide- 
lines within a 60-hour total. But, students 
should be aware, for example, that counting 
both graduate and undergraduate classwork, 
they are required to have a total of at least 30 
hours intheir majors teaching area (i.e., Amer- 
ican or European History, or American Govern- 
ment in the case of Political Science majors). 
There may also be areas where undergradu- 
ate preparation was weak or unavailable, such 
as professional education, non-western tradi- 
tions, etc. Such problems can best be solved 
on an individual basis with the help of the 
faculty advisor. 

Students should be aware that regardless of 
their major, state certification criteria recom- 
mend that social studies teachers include in 
their program preparation in the following: 
American history and government, conflicting 
ideologies, the modern world, Western herit- 
age, and non-Western traditions. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION WITH A 
MAJOR IN HISTORY (without certification) 

Hours 

A. History Courses (at least twenty 

hours at the 700 level) 40 

1. HIS 500 5 

2. At least one course from each 
of the areas: 

a. United States History 5-25 

b. European History 5-25 

c. Other (e.g., Russian) 5-25 



GRADUATE HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



179 



3 With advisor approv 

the hours in A-2 above may be 
m the political science area 
Combined graduate and undei 
graduate work In the area(s) of 
concentration (United States 
or European History) must to- 
tal 30 hours. 
B Professional Education Courses .... 15 

1 EDN721 or 722 5 

2 EDN621 or 771 5 

3 One course from: EDN 645, 651, 
711. 732, 797 5 

C. Electives (with advisor approval) 5 

TOTAL 60 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION WITH A 
MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
(without certification) 

Hours 

A Political Science Courses (at least 
twenty hours at the 700 level with 
at least ten hours in each of the 
areas: 40 

1 . American government 10 

2. International relations and 

foreign policy 10 

3. Political theory 10 

4. Comparative politics 10 

B Professional Education Courses .... 15 

1. EDN 721 or 722 5 

2. EDN 621 or 771 5 

3. One course from: EDN 645, 651, 
711,732,797 5 

C. Electives (with advisor approval) _5 

TOTAL 60 
Unless an approved undergraduate political 
science methodology course has been taken, 
students must take POS 500. 



OFFERINGS 

In addition to any specifically noted course 
prerequisites, there is the general prerequisite 
that a student must have completed the equiv- 
alent of 15 hours of undergraduate work in 
history or political science to become eligible 
to take graduate work for credit toward the 
Master of Education degrees in History or Polit- 
ical Science. 



History Offerings 
Broad Scope 

HIS 500— Historical Method (3-4-5) 

Required of all I list i88 an 

equivalent course has been taken previously 

An introduction to the nature and method of 
historical research, treating problems of inves- 
tigation, organization, and writing through dis- 
cussion and actual research experience in 
local history 

HIS 790-791— Independent Study (V-V-5) 

Available each quarter Prerequisites at 
least 15 graduate hours in History, graduate 
GPA of 3.5 and approval by a departmental 
committee. 

An application may be obtained in the 
departmental office and should be submitted, 
with the signature of the faculty member who 
will supervise the independent study, during 
pre-registration period the quarter before the 
independent study will be taken. Only one 
independent study may be credited toward the 
history concentration requirement. 

United States History Offerings 

HIS 554— Studies in American Diplomacy 
to WW I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HIS 251 or equivalent 
Considers American objectives and policies 

in foreign affairs from colonial times to World 

War I. 

HIS 555— Studies in American Diplomacy 
Since WW I (5-0-5) 

Considers American objectives and policies 
in foreign affairs from World War I to the 
present. 

HIS 616— United States Constitutional 
History I (5-0-5) 

A study of the origins, content, and expan- 
sion of the Constitution of the United States. 
(Identical to POS 616). 

HIS 617— United States Constitutional 
History II (5-0-5) 

A study of more recent constitutional devel- 
opment from the Reconstruction era to the 
present day. (Identical to POS 61 7). 

HIS 621— American Architectural History 
(4-2-5) 

A study of various styles of American archi- 
tecture, Georgian, Federal. Neoclassical, Eclec- 
tic and modern; slides from Historic American 
Building Survey; landscape architecture. Visit- 
ing speakers and field trips will be used. 



180 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 651— Reform Movements in American 
History (5-0-5) 

A study of reform movements in America 
since the Revolution. 

HIS 670— Topics in Savannah History 
(5-0-5) 

A research seminar involving intensive ex- 
ploration of local history resources. 

HIS 671— Seminar in Georgia and Local 
History (5-0-5) 

An exposition of the principles and tech- 
niques of local history followed by an intensive 
investigation of selected aspects of the history 
of Savannah and Georgia using primary sourc- 
es and culminating in a research paper. Pre- 
requisites: HIS 470, 670, or permission of the 
instructor. 

HIS 696— American Historiography (5-0-5) 

A study of the writing of American history 
from colonial times to the present with empha- 
sis on the historical philosophies and interpre- 
tations of the major schools of thought as well 
as individual historians. 

HIS 752— Studies in American Thought 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

A reading and research course devoted to 
the examination of topics in the history of 
American thought. May be repeated for credit 
as topics vary. 

HIS 777— Topics in 20th Century U.S. 
History (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

Covering the most recent period in U.S. His- 
tory, the course emphasizes political, eco- 
nomic, and social issues. May be repeated for 
credit as topics vary. 

European History Offerings 

HIS 540— English History, 1495-1660 
(5-0-5) 

An analysis of political, constitutional, eco- 
nomic, and religious issues under the Tudors 
and early Stuarts, including the English Civil 
War. 

HIS 541— English History, 1660-1815 
(5-0-5) 

An investigation of the Restoration monar- 
chies, and constitutional revolution of 1688, 
the rise of ministerial responsibility in the early 
1 8th century, the American colonial revolt, and 
England's relationship to the French Revolu- 
tion. 



HIS 549— Absolutism and the Enlightenment 
(5-0-5) 

The primary focus of this course is the social 
and intellectual history of western Europe dur- 
ing the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 

HIS 550— Modern Europe (5-0-5) 

Europe since 1815. A study of major politi- 
cal, intellectual and social developments in 
European history sincetheCongressof Vienna. 

HIS 636— European Diplomatic History 
(5-0-5) 

The history of European diplomatic relations 
during the 19th and 20th centuries. 

HIS 647— The French Revolution and 
Napoleon (5-0-5) 

The ideas and events of the Old Regime and 
the Enlightenment in France, with emphasis on 
the impact of the French Revolution and the 
career of Napoleon upon the major European 
nations. 

Readings on the French Revolution, with 
special emphasis on conflicting interpretations, 
or research projects may be assigned. 

HIS 695— European Historiography (5-0-5) 

A study of the writers of history in the West- 
ern cultural tradition, with an emphasis on the 
historical philosophies, interpretations, and prob- 
lems raised by the major modern European 
historians. 

HIS 745— The Ancient Regime (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Topics will alternate between the Age of 
Louis XIV and the Age of Enlightenment. May 
be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

HIS 750— Topics in Modern Europe (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Topics will vary among such as the follow- 
ing: the Revolutions of 1848, the World of 
Napoleon III, Bismarck and Modern Germany, 
World War I conflicts and Controversy. May be 
repeated for credit as topics vary. 

Russian, Asian, African, and Latin American 
History Offerings 

HIS 510— Latin America (5-0-5) 

An introductory course in Latin-American 
history with consideration given to institutions 
of the areas as well as events and personalities. 

HIS 512— Topics in African History (5-0-5) 

A treatment of selected topics in African 
civilizations from ancient times, with major 
emphasis on development of the continent 
since 1800. 



GRADUATE HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



181 



HIS 628— Russia and the West (5-0-5) 

A detailed study of the impact of Western 
influence on the Muscovite state in the six- 
teenth and seventeenth centuries. 

HIS 631— The Russian Revolution (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary 
tradition, the causes for the collapse of Tsar- 
ism, the Bolshevik Revolution, and victory in 
the Russian Civil War 

HIS 635— History of Russian Foreign Policy 
(5-0-5) 

This course reviews historically the devel- 
opment of Soviet foreign policy toward West- 
ern European states, notably Germany, and 
also with the non-European world through 
1917-1 940, World War II, and Cold War phases. 
Special attention will be given in this last phase 
to U.S. -Soviet rivalry, Soviet relations with 
other communist states in Eastern Europe, 
China, and the Third World, and to the recent 
moves toward detente. 

HIS 721— Topics in Modern East Asia 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

An analysis of international relations in the 
Far East since 1945. Focuses on changes in 
East Asian balance of power alignment, and 
interactions among the U.S., U.S.S.R., People's 
Republic of China, and Japan. Special atten- 
tion is given to the U.S. -Japan alliance, Sino- 
Vietnam competition, U.S. -PRCtrade/security 
relationship, PRC-Taiwan relationship, and the 
Korean unification issues. (Identical with POS 
721). 

HIS 733— Topics in Modern Russian 
History (5-0-5) 

Selected topics in 19th and 20th Century 
Russian intellectual, political, economic, and 
social history. May be repeated as topic varies. 

Museum and Preservation Studies 
Offerings 

MPS 601— Fieldwork in Historical 
Archaeology (0-10-15) 

Summer. Prerequisite: MPS 207 or permis- 
i sion of instructor or director. 
; An introduction to and first application of 
. aichaeological methods to a specific field pro- 
, ect. Excavation techniques, surveying and 
nap making, data collecting and recording, 
irchaeological photography, the identification 



ind analysis of artifacts, and the interpretation 
)r archaeological data will be presented in 
ield and laboratory work as well as in lectures 



and readings Co I for 

credll 

MPS 602— Practicum in Archaeological 
Analysis (2-6-5) 

Fall Prerequisite: permission of instructor or 
director 

The application of archaeological interpret- 
ative techniques to a specific site or analytical 
problem. Individual research projects in the 
interpretation of archaeological data and the 
conservation of artifactual finds with special 
attention to the care and storage of collec- 
tions, display in the museum setting, and the 
presentation of archaeologically-denved infor- 
mation. 

MPS 621— Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

A study of various styles of American archi- 
tecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, Eclec- 
ticism and modern; slides from Historic Ameri- 
can Building Survey; landscape architecture. 
Visiting speakers and field trips will be used. 

MPS 622— Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MPS 207 or permission of the 
instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North 
America since the arrival of European man in 
the New World. Some attention will be paid to 
British and Continental Post Medieval Archae- 
ology as well as to the special areas of Indus- 
trial and Nautical Archaeology. Special stress 
will be given to archaeological method and 
theory both as a perspective for the writing of 
history and as a component of Historic Preser- 
vation. 

Political Science and Public Administration 
Offerings 

POS 500— Research Methods (5-0-5) 

Required for POS majors unless met by 
equivalent course. 

This course deals with the methods and 
techniques of research in the behavioral sci- 
ences. Emphasis will be placed on learning 
how to evaluate research. 

POS 506— Local Government (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

A study of the environment, structure, func- 
tion, political processes, and policies of city, 
county, and other local governments in the 
United States. Special attention will be given to 
the city governments of Savannah, Ga.; Charles- 
ton, S.C.; and Gainesville, Fla. Large diverse 
cities, such as Atlanta, Jacksonville, Tampa, 
and Miami will also be compared in a more 



182 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



limited fashion and contrasted with Savannah, 
Charleston, and Gainesville. Policies exam- 
ined will includefinance(raising and spending 
money), education, welfare, pollution, trans- 
portation, and law enforcement. 

POS 507— State Government (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

A study of the environment, structure, func- 
tion, political processes, and policies of state 
governments in the United States. Special 
attention will be given to the governments of 
Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina and to 
their role in the federal system. Policies exam- 
ined will include finance (raising and spending 
money), pollution, transportation, and law en- 
forcement. 

POS 546— Far Eastern Government and 
Politics (5-0-5) 

Description and comparative analysis of the 
political systems of Communist China and 
Japan. Special attention is given to historical 
development, political institutions and pro- 
cesses, political culture, political socialization, 
and contemporary problems. 

POS/PA 601 —The Politics of the Budgetary 
Process (5-0-5) 

This course examines the procedures, strat- 
egies, and rationales involved in making public 
budgets at the local, state, and national levels. 
It is also concerned with critiques of the sev- 
eral types of budgets now in use together with 
an explanation of fiscal and monetary policies 
as they affect budgeting. Finally, it is con- 
cerned with the revenue systems in effect 
together with auditing and other controls exer- 
cised in the budgeting process. 

POS/PA 603— Public Policy Development 
(5-0-5) 

Primarily concerned with a study of the theo- 
retical aspects of decision-making (i.e., ration- 
al/comprehensive model, "mixed-scanning" 
model, incremental model, group theory, elite 
theory, and game theory), political aspects of 
policy-making process, and mobilization of 
political support. Some attempt will be made to 
apply the general theory of public policy- 
making to specific settings of civil rights issues, 
welfare policy, urban problems, and national 
defense/foreign policy. 

POS 611— American Presidency (5-0-5) 

Offers an in-depth survey of the office of the 
Presidency, with the principal emphasis on the 
relations of the executive branch with the 
Congress and the Court system. Some atten- 



tion will be given to the evolution of the Presi 
cency to its present dominant position in th< 
American political process. 

POS 612— Political Parties (5-0-5) 

Operation of political parties in the politica 
system. Relationship between party organiza 
tion, electoral system, and the recruitment an( 
advancement of political leaders. 

POS 615— American Supreme Court (5-0-5 

Analysis of the structure and functions of thi 
court, including examination of the Court a: 
policy maker. 

POS 616— United States Constitutional 
History I (5-0-5) 

A study of the origins, content, and expan 
sion of the Constitution of the United States 
(Identical with HIS 61 6). 

POS 617— United States Constitutional 
History II (5-0-5) 

A study of more recent constitutional devel 
opment from the Reconstruction era to thi 
present day. (Identical to HIS 61 7). 

POS/PA 618— Administrative Law (5-0-5) 

This course explores the framework of lav 
governing administrative agencies including 
administrative power and its control by thi 
courts, the determination and enforcement c 
administrative programs, discretion of admin 
istrative officials and their powers of sum 
mary actions, hearings before administrativi 
boards, and the respective spheres of admin 
istrative and judicial responsibility. 

POS 624— Seminar, The Sino-Soviet Powe 
Rivalries (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Critical assessment of the early Sino-Sovie 
relations before and after the 1 91 7 Bolshevi 
Revolution, followed by analysis of the roots c 
the Sino-Soviet conflicts in territorial, eco 
nomic, strategic, political, and ideological per 
spectives. The implications of this schism fc 
the contemporary global security relations wi 
be critically examined. Heavy emphasis oi 
research and oral presentation by the studen - 

POS 629— American Foreign Policy (5-0-5 

An analysis of U.S. foreign policy, and fac 
tors, both domestic and foreign, contributing I 
its formulation. 

POS 645— Comparative Economic System 
(5-0-5) 

The course will constitute a survey of th- 
basic tenets of the major economic system 
developed in the 1 9th and 20th centuries. Th 



GRADUATE LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



183 



role of government and politics will be exam- 
ined, along with the contributions to economic 
and political thought of such men as Smith, 
Marx, Keynes, and Freidman (Identical with 
ECO 645) 

POS/PA 704— Topics in Public Administra- 
tion (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite Permission of instructor. 
Designed to probe the chief concepts, theo- 
ries, ideas, and models in Public Administration 

POS 705— Topics in State and Local 
Government (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite Permission of instructor. 

POS 710— Topics in American 
Government (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite Permission of instructor 

POS 720— Topics in International Relations 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: undergraduate work in the field 
or permission of the instructor. 

A seminar course with specific titles an- 
nounced as offered. May be repeated for 
credit as topics vary. 

POS 721— Modern East Asia (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
An analysis of International Relations in the 
Far East since 1945. Focuses on changes in 
East Asian balance of power alignment and 
interactions among the U.S.. USSR., People's 
Republic of China, and Japan. Special atten- 
tion is given to the U.S. -Japan alliance, Sino- 
Vietnam, competition, U.S.-PRC trade/secu- 
rity relationship, PRC-Taiwan relationship, and 
f the Korean reunification issues. 

POS 730— Readings in Political Theory 
(5-0-5) 

i Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

POS 740— Seminar in Comparative 
1 Politics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

This course is primarily designed to give the 
• students an overview of theories of compara- 
tive politics and political development. It deals 
i with various methodologies, concepts, and 
^approaches that are being used in the analysis 
c of comparative politics. Cross-national com- 
t; panson of selected countries of Western 
Europe, Asia. Middle East, and Africa will be 

attempted. 
■! 
POS 790-791— Independent Study (V-V-5) 

lit. Offered to qualified students subject to the 

n following conditions. Prerequisites: A minimum 

^tof 25 graduate hours, including at least 15 

hours in Political Science graduate courses. 

i 



An application may be obtained in the de; 
mental office and should be submitted t< 
department by the mid-term preceding 
quarter in which the independent study will 
begin Open to students with 3 5 GPA in Politi- 
cal Sciece graduate courses and at least 3 3 
overall GPA Admission is by approval of a 
departmental committee 



Language, Literature, and 
Dramatic Arts 

Faculty 

Cram. Bradford. Department Head 

Brooks. S Kent 

Brown, Hugh 

Easterling, William 

Jones, James 

Killonn, Joseph 

Noble, David 

Pendexter, Hugh 

Strozier, Robert 



Objectives 

The Department of Languages, Literature 
and Dramatic Arts, in cooperation with the 
Department of Education, offers two programs 
of study leading to the Master of Education 
degree with concentrations in English, one a 
certifiable option and one a non-certifiable 
option. The objectives of the certifiable pro- 
gram of study are: 

1. To upgrade the teaching of secondary 
school English by increasing the compe- 
tencies of English teachers in the areas of 
linguistics, composition, and literature; 

2. To enable teachers of English in Secondary 
schools to pursue study that will enrich their 
skills, knowledge, and understanding in the 
teaching of language, composition, and 
literature; 

3. To provide opportunities for professional 
growth and cultural enrichment for individ- 
uals holding the bachelor's degree but hav- 
ing no further degree or certification objec- 
tives; 

4. To enable teachers of English in secondary 
schools to qualify for the T-5 certificate. 

The Department also offers a non-certifiable 
MEd degree with some adjusted objectives 
and requirements. 



184 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Advisement 

Each student admitted to the program in 
English will be assigned an academic advisor 
from the Department and a professional advi- 
sor from the Department of Secondary Educa- 
tion. As soon as the student is notified of this 
assignment, a conference with each advisor 
should be arranged. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Each candidate for the Master of Education 
degree with a concentration in English must 
pass a written comprehensive examination. 
The comprehensive examination will be based 
on the reading list in language and literature 
which the student must secure when he matric- 
ulates. The student may choose to be exam- 
ined under any reading list in force during the 
time of his enrollment. Copies of the reading 
list are available in the departmental office. For 
more specific information concerning the com- 
prehensive examination, contact the depart- 
ment head. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR 
IN ENGLISH (with T-5 certification) 

Hours 

A. English Courses 40 

1. ENG 620, 621,622 15 

2. Approved electives 25 

(A student may count no more 
than fifteen hours of 500 level 
work toward the degree. ENG 
600, 601 , 602, 700, and 790 may 
be retaken as the course is reof- 
fered with a different topic). 

B. Professional Education Courses .... 20 

1 EDN 721 or 722 5 

2. EDN 731; EDN 741,771 15 

TOTAL 60 
Special Note: Because the courses in the 
teaching of reading and in exceptional chil- 
ren are required for certification, a student 
must present at least one of these as part of his 
undergraduate record before he will be admit- 
ted to candidacy for the MEd degree in English 
or must present the equivalent graduate course 
in addition to the sixty hours normally required 
in the MEd program. 



OFFERINGS 

Only graduate students may take 700 level 
courses All other courses are open to under- 
graduate and graduate students. 



Drama/Speech and Drama/Speech— Film 
Offerings 

DRS/FLM 351/551— Film and Literature 
(5-0-5) 

Studies in the translation of literature to film 
with emphasis on the differences of the media 
in form, content, and perception. 

DRS 450-451-452/650-651-652— Summer 
Theater (5-15-5) 

English Offerings 

ENG 300/500— Early British Literature 
Through 1603(5-0-5) 

ENG 302/502— British Literature: 17th 
Century (5-0-5) 

ENG 304/504— British Literature: 1660-1800 
(5-0-5) 

ENG 305/505— 19th Century I: British 
Romantic Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

ENG 306/506— 19th Century II: British 
Victorian Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

ENG 307/507— 20th Century: British Poetry 
and Prose (5-0-5) 

ENG 308/508— American Literature to 1830 
(5-0-5) 

ENG 309/509— American Literature: 
Emerson through Twain (5-0-5) 

ENG 310/510— American Literature: Natur- 
alism to the Present (5-0-5) 

ENG 400/600— Special Topics (5-0-5) 

ENG 401/601— Special Genre (5-0-5) 

ENG 402/602— Special Author (5-0-5) 

ENG 605— Chaucer (5-0-5) 

ENG 606— Shakespeare (5-0-5) 

ENG 607— Milton (5-0-5) 

ENG 400/620— Practical Criticism I (5-0-5 

Composition and literary theory will consti- 
tute the basis for practical criticism of literary 
works. The relationship between literary the- 
ory and problems of teaching composition anc 
literary interpretation will be explored, and var-? 
ious interpretive approaches for understand- 
ing the literature will be examined. Course 
requirements will include oral and writter. 
analysis of literary works written before 1800 
selected primarily from the Graduate Englisr 
Reading List. 

ENG 400/621— Practical Criticism II (5-0-5 

Course description is the same as ENG 62C 



GRADUATE MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



185 



above, but utilizes literary works written after 
1800. selected primarily from the Graduate 
English Reading List 

ENG 422/622— Approaches to Language 
(5-0-5) 

A survey of the components of language 
study as well as the various approaches to 
language, meaning, and syntax Relationships 
between the teacher's language study and 
classroom implementation of various facets of 
it will be explored. 

ENG 662— Literature: Its Intellectual 
Backgrounds (5-0-5) 

ENG 666— Historical Linguistics (5-0-5) 

ENG 485/685— American Dialects (5-0-5) 

ENG 700— Special Topics (5-0-5) 

ENG 701— Studies in British Literature: 
Pre 1660(5-0-5) 

ENG 702— Studies in British Literature: 
17th and 18th Century (5-0-5) 

ENG 703— Studies in British Literature: 
19th and 20th Century (5-0-5) 

ENG 704— Studies in American Literature 
(5-0-5) 

ENG 705— Studies in Comparative 
Literature (5-0-5) 

ENG 790— Independent Study or Seminar 
(5-0-5) 



Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Faculty 

Leska. Charles, Department Head 

Cyphert, Daniel 

Hansen, John 

Harbin, Micki Sue 

Kilhefner, Dale 

Munson, Richard 

Richters, Stephen 

Shipley. Charles 



Objectives 

The Department of Mathematics and Com- 
puter Science, in cooperation with the School 
of Education, offers a program of study leading 
to the degree of Master of Education. The 
objectives of this program are: 



1 To enhance the academic and professional 
competence of mathematics teachers in 
secondary schools 

2 To develop the skills, confid* usi- 
asm, and understanding that such teachers 
need in order to meet the present scientific 
and technological challenges of modern 
society 

3 To acquaint secondary mathematics teach- 
ers with the various major branches of 
mathematics which are relevant to modern 
secondary mathematics curricula 

Advisement 

Shortly after being admitted to the MEd 
degree program in mathematics, each student 
will be assigned an advisor. Upon notification 
of this assignment, the student should arrange 
for a conference and begin planning a degree 
program. Failure by the student to consult regu- 
larly may greatly lengthen the time necessary 
to complete the program. 

Transfer of Courses 

Students who wish to transfer graduate 
credit for courses taken at other institutions 
should note the general limitations and proce- 
dures of this graduate catalog. Such transfer of 
credit is handled on an individual basis and 
requires the written approval of the student's 
advisor, the Department Head, and the appro- 
priate dean. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

During their final quarter, students are re- 
quired to pass an oral comprehensive exami- 
nation, covering the areas in which they have 
had course work. Students exempting the cal- 
culus or geometry course will be expected to 
demonstrate proficiency in these areas on the 
comprehensive examinations. Students shall 
notify their advisor and the department head, 
no later than midterm of their next-to-final 
quarter, of their intention to take the compre- 
hensive examination during the following quar- 
ter. 

The committee administering this compre- 
hensive examination will consist of three mem- 
bers of the graduate faculty of the Department 
of Mathematics and Computer Science chosen 
by the department head, and one member of 
the graduate faculty of the School of Education 
chosen by the head of the Department of 
Secondary Education. The department head 
shall notify the student of the proposed time, 
date, and place of the examination, and the 
composition of the committee. 



186 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Students who fail the oral comprehensive 
examination may request to take a written 
comprehensive examination one time during 
the same quarter. Passing the written exami- 
nation will satisfy the comprehensive exami- 
nation requirement. Students who fail should 
contact their advisor to plan remedial action 
All comprehensive examinations beyond the 
first will be written examinations. Students may 
not take written comprehensive examinations 
twice in consecutive quarters. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION WITH A 
MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS 
(with T-5 certification) 

Hours 

A. Mathematics Courses (not 

including MAT 592) 35 

1. MAT 703 5 

2. MAT 536 or 630 (536 is required 
if student has not taken Euclid- 
ean geometry 5 

3. One course from: MAT 593, 
796,797 5 

4. Electives (with advisor 
consultation) 20 

B. Professional Education Courses .... 20 

1. EDN 731, 741,771 15 

2. EDN 721 or 722 5 

C. Approved Electives (graduate science 
encouraged) _5 

TOTAL 60 
Special Note: The requirement for excep- 
tional children (EXC 622) must be met either at 
the graduate or undergraduate level. Meeting 
this or any special need will require additional 
hours beyond the basic sixty. 

OFFERINGS 

All graduate MAT courses, with the excep- 
tion of 550, 592 and 593 require at least twenty- 
five hours of college mathematics at or beyond 
the level of calculus, including at least one 
course in which writing of deduction proofs is 
required. Additional prerequisites for some 
courses appear with the course description. 

MAT 536— Modern Geometry (5-0-5) 

A survey of topics from Euclidean geometry. 

MAT 546— Mathematical Modeling and 
Optimization (4-0-4) 

Design, solution, and interpretation of mathe- 
matical models of problems in the social, life, 
and management sciences. Topics chosen 
from linear programming, dynamic program- 



ming, scheduling theory, Markovchains, game 
theory, queuing theory, and inventory theory. 

MAT 550— Principles of Computer Science 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of college math- 
ematics. 

BASIC syntax, algorithms, flow diagrams, 
debugging. Internal representation of data and 
instructions, elementary circuits. Programming 
problems and applications for the mathemat- 
ics teacher. 

MAT 553— Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 1 1 or 1 46 or MAT 550. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; 
systems of linear equations; numerical inte- 
gration and numerical solution of differential 
equations; matrix inversion; evaluation of de- 
terminants; calculation of eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors; boundary value problems. 

MAT 592— Modern Mathematics for 
Elementary Teachers (5-0-5) 

A study of the mathematics content to be 
taught in the elementary school, with empha- 
sis on current methods using concrete mate- 
rialsforteaching concepts, skills, and problem 
solving. (This course may not be counted as 
part of the 35 hour mathematics requirements). 

MAT 593— Teaching of Middle School/ 
General Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Problems of teaching traditional topics, such 
as fractions, decimals, percentage, measure- 
ment (especially, in the metric system), and 
informal geometry. Emphasis on incorporating 
drill and practice in necessary skills with fresh 
topics like probability and statistics, and with 
appropriate games and laboratory activities. 
Students will become familiar with relevant 
literature by helping to construct a resource 
list. 

MAT 606— Functions of a Complex Variable 
(5-0-5) 

Complex numbers; elementary functions 
and transformations; the Cauchy theory; con- 
formal mapping; Riemann's mapping theorem. 

MAT 616— Theory of Numbers (3-0-3) 

Divisibility and congruence; quadratic reci- 
procity; diophantine equations; number-theo- 
retic functions and their applications; selected 
advanced topics from algebraic and analytic 
number theory. 

MAT 630— Transformation Geometry Via 
the Complex Numbers (5-0-5) 

Algebraic operations on the complex num- 
bers and their corresponding geometric inter- 



GRADUATE BUSINESS EDUCATION 



187 



pretations; a characterization of isometnes of 
the complex plane as translations, rotations, 
ctions and guide reflections; a study of 
isometnes as groups; similarities; some clas- 
sic theorems 

MAT 670— History of Mathematics (3-0-3) 

A survey of the development of mathemat- 
ics from its empirical beginnings to its present 
state 

MAT 703— Analysis: Calculus in the First 
Three Dimensions (5-0-5) 

A survey of the basic notions of differential 
and integral calculus for functions in dimen- 
sions one, two, and three Development of the 
derivative as a linear operator. Special em- 
phasis on application and mathematical model- 
ing Some knowledge of linear algebra is 
expected. 

MAT 720— Applied Probability (5-0-5) 

Review of elementary probability. Stochas- 
tic processes, Markov chains, game theory, 
and simulation. Several applications are devel- 
oped throughout the course. Some knowl- 
edge of elementary probability is expected. 

MAT 796— Problem Solving (5-0-5) 

Sharpening of problem solving skills; tech- 
niques forteaching problem solving; wide var- 
iety of problem solving strategies illustrated by 
problems, primarily using high school mathe- 
matics content. 

MAT 797— Teaching of Algebra and 
Geometry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: A college geometry course 
(undergraduate or graduate). 

Major topics in algebra and geometry (such 
as functions, graphs, inequalities, proofs, con- 
structions) and the problems in teaching them. 
Students will be expected to show mastery of 
the content and will make brief classroom 
presentations. 



SCHOOL OF 
EDUCATION 

Nash, Charles, Dean 

Business Education 

Faculty 

Stokes, William, Coordinator 



Graduate Education Faculty, Armstrong State 

College 
Business Education Faculty, Savannah State 

College 



Advisement 

Upon admission to this program each stu- 
dent is assigned an advisor who approves a 
program of study As soon as the student is 
notified of this arrangement a conference 
should be scheduled by the student 



Comprehensive Examination 

During the final quarter of residence a can- 
didate must pass a final comprehensive exam- 
ination in the field. The Business Education 
Coordinator shall notify the student, the Dean 
of the School of Education and the appropriate 
official at Savannah State College ten days 
prior to examination concerning the proposed 
place, date and time of examination and the 
composition of the committee. The Examining 
Committee's decision on the candidate's per- 
formance on the Comprehensive Examination 
will be reported as "pass" or "fail" to the Dean 
of the School of Education within three days 
after the examination. 

Students interested in enrolling in the M.Ed, 
in Business Education should contact Dr 
Stokes, Head of the Secondary Education 
Department at Armstrong State College, or 
Drs. Harven or Lamb of the School of Business 
at Savannah State College. The Business 
Education Program is a cooperative program 
between Savannah State College and Arm- 
strong State College. Course descriptions for 
courses appropriate to this program are found 
in the Graduate Catalog of Armstrong State 
College and the Graduate Catalog of Savan- 
nah State College under the areas of Educa- 
tion and Business, respectively. 

Because of the cooperative nature of the 
Business Education program, students are 
encouraged to stay in close contact with their 
advisors. 



Transfer of Courses 

Students who have earned graduate credits 
at an accredited institution may transfer a 
limited number of credits to be applied toward 
the MEd degree in Business Education. Trans- 
fer of credit is handled on an individual basis. 



188 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION IN 
BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Hours 

A Business Education Courses 30 

1 . Core Courses 15 

BED 601, 603, 611 15 

2. Option Courses 15 

Select Option A or B 

a. Secretarial/Information 

Processing 15 

1 BED 621 5 

2. BED 622 or 623 5 

3. BED elective 5 

b. Basic Business/ 

Accounting 15 

1. BED 631 5 

2. BED 622 or 623 5 

3. BED elective 5 

B. Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN 721 or 722 5 

2. EDN 731, 741,771 15 

C. Electives 10 

Ten hours from business admin- 
istration, business education, 
or education to complement 
the student's program. An ap- 
propriate course in exceptional 
children (EXC 622) must be 
taken if not taken previously. 

TOTAL 60 

OFFERINGS 

The following courses are available at Savan- 
nah State College as a part of the cooperative 
Business Education Program. 

BED 601— Current Problems in Business 
Education (5-0-5) 

A study of the historical perspective orfoun- 
dations of business education: current issues, 
problems, trends; curriculum development. 

BED 603— Research Seminar in Business 
Education (5-0-5) 

Analysis of research in business education. 

BED 611— Administration and Supervision 
in Business Education (5-0-5) 

Procedures for the effective administration 
and supervision of business education pro- 
grams. 

BED 621— Vocational Development in 
Shorthand and Typewriting (5-0-5) 

Trends, methods, and procedures in the 
teaching of shorthand and typewriting. 



BED 622— Improvement of Instruction in 
Information Processing (5-0-5) 

The impact of concepts, practices, and 
trends in word processing and reprographics 
in a comprehensive business education pro- 
gram. 

Prerequisite: OAD 340: Word Processing 
Concepts or equivalent background. 

BED 623— Improvement of Instruction 
in Business Data Processing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility forT-4 certification in 
Business Data Processing. 

The impact of concepts, practices, and 
trends in data processing. 

BED 631— Improvement of Instruction in 
Accounting and Basic Business Courses 
(5-0-5) 

Methods, procedures, research, and trends 
in accounting and basic business instruction. 

BED 690— Research and Thesis (0-V-10) 

The identification and development of a 
research topic in the student's area of interest 
with the approval of the Business Education 
Graduate Faculty. 

BED 700— Internship in Teaching (0-V-10) 

Internship teaching in vocational or second- 
ary schools for those with needs in this area. 



Elementary Education 



Faculty 

Ward, Paul, Department Head 
Agykeum, Steve 
Battiste, Bettye Ann 
Bland, Nancy 
Cochran, John 
Lawson, Cornelia 
Stephens, Jacquelyn 



Objectives 

The MEd degree is designed to provide T-5 
certification according to levels and specific 
areas as stipulated by the Georgia State 
Department of Education. 

By offering advanced preparation to those 
who profesionally serve in schools, the depart- 
ments hope to aid in the development of 
teachers who possess the highest qualities of 
character, commitment, and professional com- 
petence. This aim will be facilitated by (1) 
encouraging the student to do scholarly study 
in advanced professional, specialized and 
general education subject matter: (2) helping 
the student become acquainted with the most 



GRADUATE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



189 



recent research developments in child growth 
and development and the latest trends in cur- 
riculum; (3) deepening his appreciation for 
performance in scientific investigation and 
research; and (4) promoting personal and pro- 
fessional maturity of the student that will be 
reflected in his relationships as he goes about 
his work in the community and in the field of 
education 

Advisement 

Shortly after admission each student is 
assigned an education advisor. As soon as the 
student is notified of this assignment a confer- 
ence should be scheduled to determine any 
conditions and specific requirements the stu- 
dent must meet in order to complete the 
degree and certification objectives. 

Transfer of Courses 

Provisions for transfer of credits are delin- 
eated in the Graduate Academic Regulations 
section of this catalog. Information on CATES 
courses transfer is published in the same 
section. 

Comprehensive Examination 

An appropriate committee of the faculty of 
the graduate program will administer an oral 
examination to all candidates for the Master's 
degree. The chair of the examining committee 
will be the student's advisor. The student and 
the advisor will select the other two members 
of the examining committee. This committee 
will have at least one representative from one 
of the content areas on the student's degree 
plan. 

The chair will select, in consultation with the 
student, the date, time, and place for the exam- 
ination and will report this information and the 
results of the examination to the appropriate 
department head. 

The department head shall notify the Grad- 
uate Office concerning the proposed place, 
date and time of the examination, the composi- 
tion of the Committee, and the result of the 
examination. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION IN EARLY 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. Courses Appropriate to the Major ... 40 

1 . Content courses to cover three 
areas 25 

2. Major area requirements 15 

a. EDN 727 5 

b. EDN 747 or 757 5 



c EDN 802 or Elementary 

n 

B Professional Education Courses 20 

1 EDN 12 5 

2 EDN 731, 741 Il\ 15 

TOTAL 60 
Special Note; The requirement for excep- 
tional children (EXC 622) must be met 
the graduate or undergraduate level Meeting 
this or any special need will require additional 
hours beyond the basic sixty 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION IN MIDDLE 
SCHOOL EDUCATION 

Several specialization programs are offered 
under the aegis of the MEd degree in elemen- 
tary education. These specialized programs of 
study provide, in addition to the graduate major 
in middle school education which leads to T-5 
certification, opportunity for students to qualify 
for certain other kinds of certification. 

Graduate students majoring in middle school 
education must complete a minimum of sixty 
hours of approved courses in the following 
three areas: Professional Education Sequence. 
Specialized Courses, and Approved Electives. 

One course in reading must be taken if not 
taken previously as well as an appropriate 
course in exceptional children if not taken 
previously. 

The specialized content courses may be 
chosen from the following areas: art; music; 
foreign languages; health and physical educa- 
tion; language arts, including reading, litera- 
ture, speech, linguistics; mathematics and 
science; and the social studies. Educational 
background, types of teaching experience, 
specific needs, interests and the goals of stu- 
dents will be the determinants for staff advise- 
ment in student selection of content areas. 
Upon the basis of the foregoing factors, stu- 
dents may choose specialized courses from at 
least three (including language arts) content 
areas. 

Hours 

A. Courses Appropriate to the Major and 
Specialization 40 

1. Major field (content) courses 
in middle or elem. 

education 25-30 

2. Approved electives 10-15 

Elective courses are to be se- 
lected with advisement. For stu- 
dents not previously having a 



190 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



course in middle school educa- 
tion, EDN 650-The Middle 
School is required. 
Certification Options: 
Compatible with Education pro- 
grams are certification options 
in the specialized areas which 
follow. Students desiring certi- 
fication in either option may 
take the required courses as 
they pursue the master's degree 
in their respective teaching 
fields. 

a. Supervising Teacher Ser- 
vices 15 

Specific electives include: EDN 
681,682,683 

b. Reading 25 

Selected with advisement from 
the following courses. Other 
courses not listed may be iden- 
tified with advisement. Electives 
include: EDN 641, 645, 743, 

744, 753, 754. 
B. Professional Education Courses .... 20 

1. EDN 721 or 722 5 

2. EDN 731,741,771 1_5 

TOTAL 60 

OFFERINGS 

Special Note: Most of the following EDN 
courses are provided primarily— but not ex- 
clusively—by the Department of Elementary 
Education. Generally EDN and EEE courses 
are taught through the Department of Elemen- 
tary Education. EDU and EXC courses are 
generally taught through the Department of 
Secondary Education. 

EDN Offerings 

EDN 618— Literature for the Middle 
School Learner (5-0-5) 

Provides opportunity for prospective and in- 
service teachers to explore multimedia offer- 
ings of literary value and of significance to age 
level of learners found in the middle school. 
Relates literature to all areas of the middle 
school curriculum. 

EDN 621 —Tests and Measurements (5-0-5) 

Principles and procedures in evaluating 
pupil growth. 

EDN 640— Teaching Language Arts in 
Elementary School (5-0-5) 

Exploration in the four broad areas of the 
language arts. Investigation of pertinent re- 



search of the past decade: opportunities for 
enriching experiences with media. 

EDN 641— Methods of Teaching Reading 
(5-0-5) 

Basic principles of and methods underlying 
the elementary school reading program. 

EDN 642— Reading and Literature for 
Children (5-0-5) 

Designed to acquaint elementary teachers 
with the stimulating language environment of 
the wide world of literature for children. The 
literature approach of language learning seeks 
to assist the teacher in guiding children to 
become active, sensitive learners who explore, 
inquire, and discover. 

EDN 650— The Middle School (5-0-5) 

An overview of the history and purpose of 
the middle school; characteristics of the mid- 
dle school learner; emphasis upon the nature 
and role of the middle school teacher and 
upon appropriate programs for the needs of 
middle school learners. 

EDN 681— Directed and Evaluating Student 
Teaching (5-0-5) 

Information, skills and understanding re- 
quired for effective supervision of student 
teachers. Selected teachers. 

EDN 682— Internship for Supervising 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Cooperative field experience involving pub- 
lic school teachers, student teachers, college 
personnel. 

EDN 683— Seminar in Supervision (5-0-5) 

An opportunity for experienced supervising 
teachers to evaluate criteria and to develop 
plans for increasing skills in guiding student 
teachers. 

EDN 691— Science for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

Opportunities for acquiring scientific knowl- 
edge and methodology appropriate for the 
elementary grades. 

EDN 701— The Language Arts in the 
Education Process (5-0-5) 

Provides for examination of language develop- 
ments. Current issues and recent research in 
the language arts curriculum. 

EDN 721— Advanced Studies in Human 
Growth and Development (5-0-5) 

A comprehensive view of human growth 
and development with emphasis upon the 
recent literature in these fields. 



GRADUATE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



191 



EDN 732— Multicultural Education (5-0-5) 
Educational study as it relati \rr\er\ 

can multi-ethnic society Particular emphasis 
on ethnic minorities 

EDN 741— Curriculum Planning (5-0-5) 

Treatment of curncular trends and issues 
Emphasis upon criteria needed tor curriculum 
planning and development Prerequisite: De- 
gree seeking status 

EDN 742— Seminar in Elementary 
Education (5-0-5) 

Opportunities to analyze issues, theories 
and practices in elementary education. 

EDN 743— Problems in Reading (5-0-5) 

Content based upon problems met in the 
teaching of reading and fundamental princi- 
ples and methodology of the reading process. 

EDN 744— Diagnosing and Prescribing in 
the Reading Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EDN 641 , EDN 743, or approv- 
al of instructor. 

Designed to evaluate primary issues in dif- 
ferentiated instruction. Examination of tech- 
niques employed in diagnosing and prescrib- 
ing for reading difficulties. 

EDN 753— Remedial Reading Practicum 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 744 or approval of instruc- 
tor. 

A study of the various methods and mate- 
rials utilized to test and teach remedial read- 
ers The student will be required to tutor one 
poor reader. 

EDN 754— Organization and Supervision of 
the Reading Program (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 753. 
Designed to provide an in-depth study of the 
roles of the reading specialist. 

EDN 762— Guidance in Elementary School 
(5-0-5) 

Application of the guidance point of view 
and guidance techniques to the elementary 
school classroom. Emphasis is upon the teach- 
er's role in cooperating with professional guid- 
ance workers. 

EDN/ZOO 792— Zoology for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

Modern approaches to teaching the biologi- 
cal sciences. Emphasis on understanding of 
life processes in the animal kingdom. 

EDN/BOT 793— Botany for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

Lecture-laboratory course dealing with prin- 



ciples involved in classifying and identifying 
plant 

EDN/CHE 794— Chemistry for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

A study of the more important metallic and 
non-metallic elements with emphasis on prac- 
tical application at the elementary school 
level 

EDN/PHS 795— Earth Science for Ele- 
mentary Teachers (5-0-5) 

Study of the composition of earth, classifica- 
tion and identification of rocks and minerals in 
a format appropriate for teachers of elementary- 
age children. 

EDN 796— Geography for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

A critical examination of instructional proce- 
dures and techniques in teaching geography in 
elementary grades. Selection, organization and 
presentation of structured facts of human 
environment, both cultural and physical. Em- 
phasis given to the conceptual approach in the 
analysis of space and regional interaction. 

EDN 797— Social Studies for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

Investigation of newer approaches to social 
studies teaching. Emphasis on related skills as 
map and graph reading. Analysis of behavioral 
objectives for social studies teaching. 

EDN 800-lnternship (O-V-10) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only). 

Students who hold teaching positions in 
school and/or clinic settings will be super- 
vised by college staff members for one aca- 
demic year. Supervisors will observe and hold 
conferences with each candidate. Students 
must complete one academic year to receive 
credit. 



Early Elementary Education (EEE) 
Offerings 

EEE 727— Child Growth and Development 
(5-0-5) 

Lecture and laboratory. Basic concepts and 
problems of child development: observation, 
behavior patterns, child study. Required for 
post baccalaureate students. 

EEE 728— Movement Exploration and Motor 
Learning in Children (5-0-5) 

Emphasis on understandings, skills, and 
teaching techniques in movement education 
needed in the teaching of young children and 
pre-adolescents. 



192 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EEE 737— Foundations of Early Childhood 
Education (5-0-5) 

Historical developments, philosophy and 
objectives of nursery schools, kindergartens, 
and day care centers; exploration of teacher- 
child and teacher-family interactions, diagno- 
sis and evaluation of children. 

EEE 738— The Young Child and His Family, 
School, Community (5-0-5) 

Interaction with community for services and 
resources. Family study from many different 
angles, utilizing data from various fields, devel- 
oping skills in procedures and techniques for 
working with parents. 

EEE 747— Early Elementary Education 
Curriculum (5-0-5) 

Content, approaches, methods and mate- 
rials appropriate foryoung children as present- 
ed in interdisciplinary or experience approach 
emphasizing how language arts, science, math- 
ematics, social studies, and the creative arts 
are adapted to skills and needs of children. 

EEE 757— Early Elementary Instructional 
Strategies (5-0-5) 

Review of research and programs; teaching 
strategies for children under ten. Implications 
for program development. Developing skills 
involved in translating concepts into class- 
room practice. 

EEE 758— Creative Activities in Art, Music, 
Dance and Drama (5-0-5) 

Focus on activities in the four designated 
areas, utilization of interdisciplinary approach. 

EEE 802— Practicum in Early Elementary 
Education (O-V-5) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only). 

Supervised experience with young children, 
level dependent upon prior experiences of 
student. Seminars, projects and research 
planned according to students' needs. 



Physical Education 

Faculty 

Sims, Roy, Department Head 
Burgess. Clifford 
Cochran, John 
Newberry, Lloyd 
Stokes, William 
Tapp, Lawrence 
Ward. Paul 



Objectives 

The Graduate study in physical education is 
designed to strengthen and extend the stu- 
dent's knowledge of history, principles and phi- 
losophy of physical education. In addition, it 
will include in-depth study in physiology of 
exercise, movement exploration, sports psy- 
chology, and kinesio-therapy. The program 
will provide opportunities for students to develop 
an understanding of the application of these 
sciences and areas of knowledge to the growth 
and development of atypical as well as typical 
children. 

The primary emphasis at the master's level 
will be the preparation of better teachers and 
will include meaningful laboratory and appro- 
priate field experiences. Attention will be given 
to the developmental phases of graduate pro- 
grams for appropriate consideration and em- 
phasis on physical education at the early 
childhood, elementary, junior high and second- 
ary school levels. 
The graduate program will: 
-Contribute to the continual development of 
the community's educational opportunities. 
-Advance the student's technical and ana- 
lytical skills of mechanical analysis and 
motor learning through advanced program 
work and study. 

-Provide an opportunity for the advanced 
study of the physiological functions of the 
human body. 

-Provide for advanced educational skills in 
the methods of planning, teaching methods, 
curriculum development and research tech- 
niques. 

-Provide opportunities for the advancement 
of knowledge in analytical and technical 
skills of movement. 

-Provide an opportunity for continuous pro- 
fessional growth and competency, for ex- 
panding professional and cultural back- 
grounds and for extending knowledge and 
understanding in an area of specialty. 
-Provide an opportunity for personal growth 
and development through group interaction 
and cooperative research studies and 
methods. 



Advisement 

Upon admission to the program each stu- 
dent is assigned an advisor who approves a 
program of study. As soon as the student is 
notified of this assignment a conference should 
be scheduled by the student. 



GRADUATE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



193 



Comprehensive Examination 

A committee of the faculty of the graduate 
program will administer a comprehensive exam- 
ination to candidates for the Master's degree 
The student's advisor will be the chair of the 
examining committee. This chair, in consulta- 
tion with the student, will select the date, time, 
and place for the examination and will report 
this information and the examination results to 
the appropriate college officials 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER IN EDUCATION IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A Required Education Courses 20 

1 EDU 722,731 10 

2. EDU 741, 771 10 

B. Required Physical Education 

Courses 20 

1. PE 700, 760 8 

2 PE 770, 780,800 12 

C. Elective Physical Education 

Courses 10 

Two courses selected from: 
PE710, 720. 730, 740,750, 

790,810; EXC622 10 

(EXC 622 is required if not taken 
in undergraduate program) 

D Approved Electives 1_0 

TOTAL 60 

OFFERINGS 

Physical Education Offerings 

PE 700— Advanced Physiology of Exercise 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: PE 230 or equivalent Physiol- 
ogy of Exercise. 

A study of the neuromuscular, metabolic, 
and cardiovascular-respiratory responses and 
adaptations to exercise. Emphasis is placed 
on the biologic basis of human physical per- 
formance and fitness. Laboratory experiences 
include exposure to environmental, ergono- 
metric, metabolic, circulatory, respiratory, and 
body composition measurement techniques. 

PE 710— Psychology of Coaching (5-0-5) 

A study of the principles of psychology as 
applied to the problems of coaching today's 
athletes. A reading and research course de- 
signed to help students understand today's 
special situations, individual and team per- 
sonalities and ways to motivate and improve 
performance. 



PE 720— Philosophy of Sports In Society 
(5-0-5) 

A study of the significance of sports in 
society The course will focus on the definition 
and clarification of sports and the sporting 
experience in order to determine the place and 
meaning of sports in our lives 

PE 730— Outdoor and Recreational 
Activities (5-0-5) 

In-depth study into the formulation of the 
major factors determining the philosophy of 
recreation, program planning and administra- 
tion of outdoor experiences and recreational 
activities in all aspects of school, church and 
industry. Emphasis upon the development of a 
specific recreational program and/or activity 

PE 740— Social and Psychological Aspects 
of Physical Education (5-0-5) 

A study of the research literature in sociol- 
ogy and psychology as it relates to physical 
activity. Emphasis is placed on application to 
physical education and athletics. 

PE 750— Administration and Supervision 
of Physical Education and Athletics (5-0-5) 

Advanced study and research into the rela- 
tionship of athletics and physical education 
programs in the educational community. Spe- 
cific attention is given to personnel, eligibility, 
finance, liability, safety, and policies in direct- 
ing and supervising intramural and interscho- 
lastic athletics. 

PE 760— Readings in Physical Education 
and Athletics (3-0-3) 

A comprehensive review of literature in 
physical education, athletics, and related areas, 
with emphasis on learning to evaluate research 
methods and findings. 

PE 770— Motor Learning (4-2-5) 

This course is designed to acquaint stu- 
dents with research findings and empirical 
evidence regarding the physiological and psy- 
chological implicationsof motor skills, learning 
theories and other individual differences as 
they influence physical activity. 

PE 780— Mechanical Analysis (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PE 330 or equivalent Kinesiol- 
ogy. 

A scientific analysis of basic human move- 
ment skills with emphasis on the laws of phys- 
ics and their application in physical education 
and sport. 



194 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 790— Methods and Materials (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PE 443 or equivalent Methods 
and Curriculum in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion 

Selection of level of specialization for in- 
depth study of research materials and current 
trends in physical education teaching methods. 

PE 800— Seminar on Current Issues (2-0-2) 

Study of current issues and problems in 
physical education with emphasis on outstand- 
ing studies and research in the field. Emphasis 
is on student participation to provide them the 
opportunity to exchange and assimilate ideas 
and concepts. 

PE 810— Research in Physical Education 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PE 312 or equivalent mea- 
surement and Education in Health, Physical 
Education and Recreation. 

A study of methods of research in physical 
education. An analysis of selected research 
articles and designs will be emphasized. 

Science Education 

Faculty 

Stokes, William, Coordinator 

Beumer, Ronald 

Brewer, John 

Burgess, Clifford 

Guillou, Laurent 

Hansen, John 

Kilhefner, Dale 

Newberry, Lloyd 

Pingel, Allen 

Robinson, Doris 

Stratton, Cedric 

Thorne, Francis 

Ward. Paul 

Whiten, Morris 

Advisement 

Upon admission to this program each stu- 
dent is assigned an advisor who approves a 
program of study. As soon as the student is 
notified of this assignment a conference should 
be scheduled by the student. 

Comprehensive Examination 

To receive the MEd degree with a concen- 
tration in science education, each student is 
required to pass a comprehensive examina- 
tion covering the areas in which he has had 
course work. The examination may be oral or 
written. Oral examinations will last approxi- 
mately one and one-half hours; written exami- 



nations will last approximately three hours. This 
examination will be completed no later than 
mid-term of the quarter preceding that in 
which graduation is anticipated. If the student 
should fail the examination, he may be reex- 
amined orally or in writing, at the discretion of 
the departments in areas of specific weakness 
only. The Coordinator shall notify the student 
and the Dean of the School of Education ten 
days prior to the examination concerning the 
proposed place, date, and time of the reported 
to the Dean of the School of Education within 
three days after the examination. 

Transfer of Courses 

Students who have earned graduate credits 
at an accredited institution may transfer a 
limited number of credits to be applied toward 
the MEd degree in Science Education. Transfer 
of credit is handled on an individual basis. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION IN 
SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. Science Courses 35 

1. EDN798 5 

2. Other courses are selected, in 
consultation with the student's ad- 
visor, from the graduate courses 
in biology, chemistry, earth sci- 
ence, mathematics and physics. 
Each student will be required to 
take at least 30 hours of science 
content courses to include at 
least ten hours from each of two 
separate disciplines 30 

B. Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN721 or 722 5 

2. EDN 731,741,771 15 

Electives are to be chosen through 
advisement and according to 
individual needs and may include 
courses in science, education, or 

a suitable third field with the prior 
approval of the student's advisor. 
An appropriate course in excep- 
tional children (EXC 622) must be 
taken if not taken previously. 

TOTAL 60 



Secondary Education 

Faculty 

Stokes, William. Department Head 
Burgess, Clifford 



GRADUATE SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



195 



Balloway, Herbert 
dewberry, Lloyd 
Robinson, Aureha 
Stevens, Linda 
fhomas, Claudia 



Objectives 

The MEd degree is designed to provide T-5 
:ertification according to levels and specific 
ireas as stipulated by the Georgia State 
Department of Education. Degree programs 
or specific, secondary areas of certification 
;uch as history, English, biology, etc., are de- 
;cnbed in the chapters of this catalog devoted 
o these content areas. The education depart- 
nents participate in each such program but 
ilso offer several complete programs leading 
o certification, such as Special Education- 
tehavior Disorders. Reading Specialist, etc. 
P he education department heads can provide 
juidance for meeting the certification require- 
nents. 

By offering advanced preparation to those 
vho professionally serve in schools, the depart- 
nents hope to aid in the development of 
eachers who possess the highest qualities of 
:haracter, commitment, and professional com- 
>etence. This aim will be facilitated by (1) 
encouraging the student to do scholarly study 
n advanced professional, specialized and 
jeneral education subject matter; (2) helping 
he student become acquainted with the most 
ecent research developments in child growth 
ind development and the latest trends in cur- 
iculum; (3) deepening his appreciation for 
)erformance in scientific investigation and 
esearch; and (4) promoting personal and pro- 
essional maturity of the student that will be 
eflected in his relationships as he goes about 
lis work in the community and in the field of 
education. 

Advisement 

Shortly after admission each student is 
issigned an education advisor. As soon as the 
itudent is notified of this assignment, a con- 
erence should be scheduled to determine any 
conditions and specific requirements the stu- 
Jent must meet in order to complete the 
Jegree and certification objectives. 

rransfer of Courses 

Provisions for transfer of credits are delin- 
eated in the Graduate Academic Regulations 
;ection of this catalog. Information on CATES 
course transfer is published in the same 
;ection. 



Comprehensive Examination 

An appropriate committee of the faculty of 
the graduate program will administer an oral 
examination to all candidates for the Master's 
degree. The chair of the examining comn I 
will be the student's advisor The student and 
the advisor will select the other two members 
of the examining committee. This comn 
will have at least one representative from one 
of the content areas on the student's degree 
plan. 

The chair will select, in consultation with the 
student, the date, time, and place for the exam- 
ination and will report this information and the 
results of the examination to the appropriate 
department head. 

The department head shall notify the Grad- 
uate Office concerning the proposed place, 
date and time of the examination, the composi- 
tion of the Committee, and the result of the 
examination. 

Degree Programs 

Degree programs which are cooperative 
with departments in the School of Arts and 
Sciences and the School of Human Services 
are clearly outlined in the departmental sec- 
tion of this catalog. Departments which are 
cooperative in MEd programs include Biology, 
Chemistry, Health Science, History and Politi- 
cal Science, Languages, Literature and Dra- 
matic Arts, and Mathematics. 

Degree programs in Special Education follow. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION— LEARNING DISABILITIES 

Special Note: Prerequisites for this degree 
program include Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (EXC 622), a T-4 Certificate, and one 
year of teaching experience. 

Hours 

A. Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN 722,731 10 

2. EDN 741,771 10 

B. Specialization Courses 30 

1. EXC 723, 741.755 15 

2. EXC 770, 775, 788 15 

C. Related Field Courses 10 

Two courses selected from: 
EDN 721, 744; EXC 625, 754, 
760, 773. 793 _ 

TOTAL 60 



196 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION— BEHAVIOR DISORDERS 

Special Note. The prerequisite for this degree 
program includes Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (EXC 622). 

Hours 

A Professional Education Courses .... 20 

1. EDN 722,731 10 

2. EDN 741,771 10 

B. Specialization Courses 30 

1. EXC 723, 754, 780, 781 20 

2. EXC 785, 786 10 

C. Related Field Courses 10 

Two courses selected from: 
EDN 641, 645, 753; EXC 625, 
721, 755, 760, 770, 773, 775, 
788, 790, 791, 792 

TOTAL 60 
Special Note: Students are required to com- 
plete a minimum of ten hours practicum (cf. 
specialization courses) in one of the following 
ways: 

A. EXC 785 and EXC 786 may be completed 
over a two quarter period by those students 
who are working full time with Behavior 
Disordered students, or 

B. Students who are not employed full time 
may complete EXC 785 and 786 by working 
2 different quarters in two different settings 
(such as Georgia Regional Hospital, Psy- 
choeducational Center, Behavior Disorders 
classes) for a minimum of 10 hours per 
week for the entire quarter. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION— SPEECH/LANGUAGE 
PATHOLOGY 

Special Note: Prerequisitesforthisdegree 
program include Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (EXC 622) and a T-4 Certificate in 
Speech Pathology or its equivalent. 

Hours 

A. Professional Education Courses . . 15 

1. EDN 721,731 10 

2. EDN 771 5 

B. Specialization Courses 40 

1 . EXC 730, 732, 734, 736 20 

2. EXC 737, 738, 739, 740 20 

C. Related Field Courses 5 

One course selected with 
advisement from the following: 



EXC 723, 754, 755, 770, 775, 
760, 790, 791, 792; EDN 641 
TOTAL 



60 



OFFERINGS 

Special Note: Most of the following EDU 
courses are provided primarily— but not 
exclusively— by the Department of Second- 
ary Education. Generally EDU and EXC 
courses are taught through the Department 
of Secondary Education. EDN and EEE 
courses are generally taught through the 
Department of Elementary Education. 

EDU Offerings 

EDU 620— Adolescent Literature (5-0-5) 

An examination of the values to be found 
in folk tales, classical myths and legends, 
as well as the body of contemporary writing, 
especially created to satisfy interests and 
needs of adolescents. 

EDU 645— Reading in the Secondary 
School (5-0-5) 

Designed to acquaint teachers with teach- 
ing reading in content areas. 

EDU 651— Newer Teaching Media I 
(2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate media or 
permission of instructor. 

Course in multi-sensory learning and the 
utilization and preparation of audio-visual 
materials. Includes the areas of programmed 
instruction, instructional design, and com- 
puters in education. 

EDU 665— Introduction to Adult 
Education (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree in 
teaching field or permission of Department 
Head. 

An overview of the historical, philosophi- 
cal, psychological forces affecting adult 
education in the United States. Attention 
will be given to purposes of and practices in 
the field. 

EDU 666— Psychology of Adult Learning: 
How Adults Learn (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDU 665. 

Designed to provide the student of adult 
education with an opportunity to become 
acquainted with psychological factors which 
influence the adult's learning behavior. Spe- 
cifically, the course will enable the student 
of adult education to acquire and/or to 
develop a basic understanding of the re- 



GRADUATE SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



197 



search and theoretical formulations regarding 
adults as learners. 

Emphasis will be placed upon conditions 
that affect the adult learner in terms of his 
ability, potential, motivation, self-perception 
role identification status and cultural back- 
ground 

EDU 668— Adult Education-Strategies 
and Resources (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDU 666 

Study and evaluation of methods and mate- 
rials employed in teaching adults. Utilization of 
psychology of teaching the adult learner with 
emphasis upon current teaching strategies for 
the educated and under-educated adult. 

EDU 681— Directed and Evaluating 
Student Teaching (O-V-5) 

Information, skills and understanding re- 
quired for effective supervision of student 
teachers. Selected teachers. 
EDU 682— Internship for Supervising 
Teachers (V-V-5) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only). 

Cooperative field experience involving pub- 
lic school teachers, student teachers, college 
personnel. 

EDU 683— Seminar in Supervision 
(V-V-5) 

An opportunity for experienced supervising 
teachers to evaluate criteria and to develop 
plans for increasing skills in guiding student 
teachers. 

EDU 702— Seminar in Education for Staff 
Development (V-V-V) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Students 
must be enrolled in an approved staff devel- 
opment activity sponsored by a local school 
system. Admission to the course must be 
approved by the student's advisor and by the 
department head. 

This course is designed to provide a frame- 
work through which teachers and local school 
systems, in conjunction with the college, may 
offer graduate credit for approved staff devel- 
opment activities. Credit for this course may 
be approved for either content or elective 
work. 

With a change in content, this course may 
be repeated for additional credit. 

EDU 711— Philosophy and History of 
Education (5-0-5) 

Traditional and modern philosophical sys- 
tems and their impact on educational theory 
and practice. 



EDU 722— The Nature and Conditions of 
Human Learning (5-0-5) 

An a ■ . of the vai nesof 

learning with emphasis upon the latest ideas in 
this field 

EDU 725— Contemporary Problems In 
Educational Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Two or more courses in psy- 
chology or sociology or a combination of the 
two. 

A seminar to explore contemporary prob- 
lems of a psycho-social nature affecting edu- 
cation. 

EDU731— Social Foundationsof Education 
(5-0-5) 

Basic graduate course in the contribution of 
the social sciences to education, focused on 
the significant issues and problems of educa- 
tion. 

EDU 750— Practicum in Health Education 
(1-8-5) 

Supervised, educational activity in a variety 
of settings including, but not limited to public 
health agencies, private health facilities and/or 
public schools. The course will be devoted to 
the design and implementation of health cur- 
riculum and includes a weekly one hour sem- 
inar on campus. 

EDU 751— Newer Teaching Media II (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 651 or permission of 
instructor. 

An advanced course emphasizing design 
and production of instructional materials in a 
laboratory setting. Student will design, pro- 
duce, and try out individual projects using a 
variety of media. 

EDU 761— Principles and Practices of 
Guidance and Counseling (5-0-5) 

Guidance and counseling philosophy, pro- 
cess and techniques with application to indi- 
vidual and group training and therapy. 

EDU 771— Education Research (5-0-5) 

Methodology of educational research and 
its application to instruction and guidance. 

EDU 772— Field-Based Research (V-V-5) 

Research theory and an "on-the-job" re- 
search project dealing with improvement in 
the student's specific situation. 

EDU 773— Individual Research (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 771 . 

Under the direction of a graduate faculty 
advisor, students conduct research relating to 
their professional interests and responsibilities. 



198 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EDU 775— Individual Study in Education 
(0-V-(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: EDN 771. 

Opportunities provided for supervised re- 
search and independent study in selected 
areas Research and reading in education to 
meet the needs of students involved. Designed 
for students with a knowledge of research. All 
work offered on an individual basis with the 
approval of department chairman, advisor, 
and instructor concerned. 

EDU 791— Environmental Science (5-0-5) 

Exploration of science principles through 
problem-solving. Designed to make environ- 
mental science situations meaningful. 

EDU 800— Internship (0-V-10) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only). 

Students who hold teaching positions in 
school and/or clinic settings will be super- 
vised by college staff members for one aca- 
demic year. Supervisors will observe and hold 
conferences with each candidate. Students 
must complete one academic year to receive 
credit. 

EDU 805— School Evaluation (0-V-(5-10)) 

Study of school assessment procedures, 
self-study and follow-up. 

Education of Exceptional Children (EXC) 
Offerings 

EXC 622— Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (5-0-5) 

An introductory study of the identification, 
diagnosis, and education of the atypical child. 

EXC 625— Mental Hygiene in Teaching 
(5-0-5) 

A consideration of the forces and influences 
on what constitutes normal behavior in per- 
sonal and social relationships within the school 
setting. Student behavior, teacher behavior, 
and student-teacher interaction dynamics will 
receive major attention. Open to qualified 
undergraduate students, graduate students, 
and teachers seeking renewal of certificates. 

EXC 626— Psychology of Abnormal Be- 
havior (5-0-5) 

The study of the various forms of abnormal 
behavior of children; etiology, symptoms, and 
treatment. 

EXC 723— Assessment and Measurement 
of the Exceptional Child (5-0-5) 

This course will emphasize the means and 
interpretations of psychological, psychiatric, 
educational, and other evaluations. It will at- 



tempt to help the teacher understand and 
make relevant the test specialists' report. 

EXC 730— Diagnosis and Appraisal of 
Communication Disorders (5-0-5) 

Instruments and procedures in diagnosing 
speech and language disorders. 

EXC 732— Voice Disorders (5-0-5) 

A study of the vocal mechanism and related 
disorders; therapeutic procedures for varying 
kinds of voice disorders are included. 

EXC 734— Language Disorders in Children 
(5-0-5) 

Methods of differential diagnosis and reme- 
diation of the major language disorders of 
children. 

EXC 736— Language Disorders in 
Adults (5-0-5) 

A study of speech and language disorders in 
adults, with emphasis on the pathology, eval- 
uation, and treatment of aphasia. 

EXC 737— Advanced Articulation (5-0-5) 

A study of both functional and organically- 
based disorders of articulation, including etiol- 
ogy, diagnosis, and therapeutic procedures. 

EXC 738— Aural Rehabilitation (5-0-5) 

Rehabilitation principles and procedures in- 
volved in management of the hearing-impaired 
person, including speech reading, auditory 
training, management of hearing aids and 
other amplification systems. 

EXC 739— Practicum I in Speech/ 
Language Pathology (Residence) (0-15-5) 

Supervised experience with a variety of 
communication disorders in the public school 
and on-campus clinic setting. The course 
includes the development of therapeutic pro- 
grams, writing lesson plans, and conducting 
therapy with direct supervision. 

EXC 740— Practicum II in Speech/ 
Language Pathology (Nonresidence) 
(0-15-5) 

Supervised experience with a variety of 
communication disorders in off-campus, non- 
public school settings. Approved settings may 
include hospitals, nursing homes, special day 
schools, and institutions. 

EXC 741— Teaching of Reading to 
Exceptional Children (3-4-5) 

First half of course consists of classroom 
instruction in procedures for teaching reading 
Second half of course consists of tutoring ar 
exceptional child in reading under the instruc- 
tor's supervision. 



GRADUATE SECONDARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



199 



EXC 754— Behavioral Intervention 
Procedures for Children (5-0-5) 

To acquaint students with historical back- 
ground, developments, concepts, definitions, 
terminology and techniques of behavioral inter- 
vention as well as application of such pro- 
cedures 

EXC 755— Advanced Research and Read- 
ings in Special Education (5-0-5) 

The students will be directed in research 
and readings in special education to deepen 
their knowledge of exceptional children and to 
draw conclusions from research to apply to 
specific situations. Historical perspectives and 
current trends in special education will be 
emphasized. 

EXC 760— Individuating Curriculum and 
Parent & Teacher Consultation Skills 
(5-0-5) 

This course is designed to broaden the skills 
of the teacher of the exceptional child in the 
areas of identifying processing problems, using 
task analysis, and prescribing remediation 
approaches. In addition, the student will learn 
to communicate more effectively with regular 
classroom teachers and parents of excep- 
tional children in order to plan a more effective 
treatment program. 

EXC 770— Characteristics of the Learning 
Disabled (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 622 or equivalent. 

The emphasis in this course will be on inci- 
dence, etiologies, prevailing characteristics, 
and family interactions of learning disabled 
children. 

EXC 773— Independent Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 771. 

Under the direction of a graduate faculty 
advisor, students conduct research relating to 
their professional interests and responsibilities. 

EXC 775— Methods of Teaching the Learn- 
ing Disabled (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 770. 

The student will survey the various methods 
that have been developed to work with the 
learning disabled student, learn howthe meth- 
ods are applied, and design teaching strate- 
gies for individual learners based on the theo- 
retical models. 

EXC 780— Behavior Pathology in Children 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 622. 
A study of the epidemiology, etiology, prog- 
nosis, and treatment of behavior disorders in 



children An extensive examination of the 
social milieu will characterize the course 

EXC 781— Education of the Emotionally 
Disturbed (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite EXC 780 

The student will survey the various types of 
programs and approaches historically and 
currently in operation for the emotionally dis- 
turbed child. Emphasis will be placed on those 
programs within the public school setting 

EXC 785— Practicum I in Special Education 
(0-10-5) 

Five hours to be taken among the first 
twenty-five hours of the student's program 
During this time, the student will be required to 
interact with behavior disordered children a 
minimum of ten clock hours per week in pro- 
grams designed to ameliorate the disability 

EXC 786— Practicum II in Special Education 
(0-10-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 785. 

Five quarter hours of individual studies under 
the direction of the student's advisor, or the 
advisor's designate. The student will be re- 
quired to work with behavior disordered stu- 
dents for a minimum of ten clock hours per 
week. The program will be designed so that the 
student develops proficiency in a minimum of 
one treatment mode for behavior disordered 
children. The student will be expected to dem- 
onstrate expertise on planning, implementing, 
and continuously reevaluating his/her treat- 
ment approaches. 

EXC 787— Practicum III in Special 
Education (0-10-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 786. 

Five hours taken during the final quarter of 
the student's program. The student will be 
required to serve a minimum of ten clock hours 
per week in facilities designed for behavior 
disordered and/or multiple handicapped chil- 
dren. The student will be expected to have 
direct involvement in teaching exceptional 
children. A portion of this five quarter hours 
must be served in a residential facility. 

EXC 788— Practicum (0-10-5) 

Prerequisites: EXC 770 and EXC 775. 

The student will be required to serve a min- 
imum of ten clock hours per week in classes 
designed to teach identified learning disabled 
students. The student will be expected to have 
direct involvement in planning for and teach- 
ing learning disabled children individually and 
in small groups. 



200 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EXC 790— Seminar in Characteristics of the 
Mildly Handicapped (5-0-5) 

The seminar will cover the causes and 
characteristics of the mildly handicapping con- 
ditionsof behavior disorder, learning disability, 
and mental retardation. 

EXC 791— Seminar in Methods for Working 
with Mildly Handicapped (5-0-5) 

This methods course will prepare the teacher 
to plan effective remediation strategies for 
individuals and groups of children with mild 
behavior disorders, learning disabilities, and 
mental retardation. 

EXC 792— Practicum in Working with the 
Mildly Handicapped (0-10-5) 

The student will spend a minimum of ten 
hours per week planning for and teaching 
groups of children who are placed in inter- 
related classrooms, i.e., children with behavior 
disorders, learning disabilities, and mental 
retardation. 

EXC 793— Special Education 
Administration (5-0-5) 

A study of the role of leadership personnel 
within general and special education in plan- 
ning and implementing comprehensive edu- 
cational programs for exceptional students. 

School of Human 
Services 

Repella, James, Dean 



Criminal Justice 

Faculty 

Megathlin, William, Department Head 
Magnus, Robert, Program Director 
Menzel, George 
Murphy, Dennis 



Objectives 

The Department of Criminal Justice offers a 
program of study leading to the degree Master 
of Science in Criminal Justice. The objectives 
of the program are: 

1. To provide graduate-level education for 
professional criminal justice policy-makers 
and policy-makers in related fields in order 
to stimulate professionalization within the 
criminal justice system. 



2. To produce scholars better prepared than 
those currently available to meet the chal- 
lenges of the future in research and teach- 
ing. 

Advisement 

Shortly after admission each student will be 
assigned an advisor. The student should meet 
with the advisor as soon as possible after 
admission to establish an approved program 
of study. 

Transfer of Courses 

Students should note carefully the general 
section on transfer of Graduate Credits ap- 
pearing in the Academic Regulations of this 
Catalog. The Criminal Justice Program will 
normally accept two courses (1 quarter hours, 
6 semester hours) for transfer credit. 

Degree Requirements 

The degree MS in Criminal Justice requires 
the completion of 60 quarter hours of approved 
coursework. The student will have the option 
of either writing a thesis or doing a field practi- 
cum as part of the program of study. 

Comprehensive Education 

Each non-thesis candidate for the degree 
MS in Criminal Justice must pass a writter 
comprehensive examination. An oral exami- 
nation may also be scheduled. For specific 
information on the written and oral compre- 
hensive examinations students should con- 
tact their advisor. 

OFFERINGS 

CJ 700— Seminar in Justice Administration 
(5-0-5) 

An analysis of the criminal justice process 
from prevention and arrest to release aftei 
incarceration. The philosophies, practices, anc 
procedures of agencies responsible for the 
administration of justice are viewed and ana- 
lyzed. 

CJ 701— Advanced Research Methods in 
Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Application of advanced research method? 
to problems in the criminal justice system. 

CJ 702— Criminal Justice Planning and 
Innovation (5-0-5) 

Introduction to planning techniques anc 
their impact on criminal justice program devel 
opment. Policy and decision-making proce 
dures pertaining to affiliated agencies an( 
organizations are analyzed. Planning involve: 
identification of problem areas, diagnosis 



GRADUATE HEALTH SCIENCE 



201 



causation, formulating solutions, altern.i 
strategies, and mobilizing resources needed 
vet change 

CJ 703— Seminar in Crime Causation 
(5-0-5) 

Concentration with the individual offender is 
on the relationship of motives, attitudes, and 
abilities to participate in criminal activity With 
groups, consideration is given to peer influen- 
ces in the shaping and reinforcement of crimi- 
nal conduct 

CJ 704— Law and Social Control (5-0-5) 

A social interaction approach to the chang- 
ing relationship between legal norms and 
social structure. 

CJ 705— Administration and Management 
for Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

New management and administrative require- 
ments of the criminal justice complex in transi- 
tion. Problems and innovative concepts of 
criminal justice system development, decision 
theory, information needs, planning and new 
managerial perspectives. 

CJ 706— Juvenile Justice Administration 
(5-0-5) 

Assessment of the policies and practices of 
agencies involved in processing young per- 
sons through the juvenile court system. Atten- 
tion will be paid to the intake procedures of the 
juvenile court; the adjudicational and disposi- 
tional procedures of the juvenile court. 

CJ 707— Police Systems Development 
(5-0-5) 

Analytic techniques of defining goals, de- 
signing and evaluating police operational 
strategies. Factors which influence policy de- 
cisions; policy development and linkage with 
delivery systems. 

CJ 708— Seminar in Criminal Evidence 
(5-0-5) 

Survey of rules of evidence, particularly 
demonstrative, testimonial, and circumstantial 
proof. Search and seizure, the Exclusionary 
Rule, the Best Evidence Rule, Hearsay Rule 
and its exceptions. 

CJ 709— Police Problems and Practices 
(5-0-5) 

Personnel and organization of police forces, 
with special attention to the interaction of the 
police with other governmental and social 
institutions. 

CJ 710— The Incarceration Process (5-0-5) 

Theory, purposes and practice of correc- 
tional institutions; the prison as a total institu- 



tion, the impact of the institutional experience 
on post-release success 

CJ 711— Applied Treatment Modalities in 
the Institutional Setting (5-0-5) 

Analysis of s; nt practices at- 

tempted with various types of offenders, prob- 
lems of matching helping methods to personal- 
ity and setting; problems in control and treat- 
ment of non-amendable and aggressive of- 
fenders Evaluating the helping process that 
must survive within institutions whose pur- 
poses are also to punish and isolate. 

CJ 712— Seminar in Community Treatment 
and Services (5-0-5) 

An analysis of probation and other alterna- 
tives to incarceration in the community setting, 
and of the feasibility and effectiveness of 
treatment of individuals under sentence in the 
community. 

CJ 713 & 714— Field Practicum (2-V-(1-5)) 

Planned program of research observation, 
study and work in selected criminal justice 
agencies. 

CJ 715— Thesis (0-V-(1-10) 

Planned research and writing directed by 
the student's Thesis Committee. 



Health Science 

Faculty 

Parsons, Dennis, Program Director 
Beumer, Ronald, Biology Representative 
McCarthy, William, Business Representative 
Leska, Charles, Computer Science 
Stokes, William, Education Representative 
McCarthy, John, Public Policy Representative 



Objectives 

The Health Science Program is designed to 
enhance the concept of health on behalf of 
individuals and the general public. The curricu- 
lum will emphasize health promotion, wellness 
and prevention rather than the curing of illness 
The primary format will be an interdisciplinary 
approach which permits a more global view of 
health. More specific objectives are: 

1 . To teach individuals that behavioral change 
can occur through education; 

2. To foster health, health promotion, and di- 
sease prevention; 

3. To prepare competent, knowledgeable 
health educators; and, 



202 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



4 To provide health practitioners the oppor- 
tunity to gain expertise in the health related 
areas of education, administration, man- 
agement, computer science, correctional 
science, or public policy. 

Advisement 

Each student admitted to the MHS program 
will be assigned an advisor. As soon as the 
student is notified of this assignment, a con- 
ference between the advisor and advisee 
should be arranged. This meeting will result in 
an approved program of study. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. Health Science Courses 40 

1. HS 500, 550, 660, 670, 700 25 

2. EDU771 5 

3. HS 790, 791 or HS 795 10 

B Concentration Courses 20 

(one of the following areas in 
toto) 

1 . Health Education 20 

a. HE 500, 650 10 

b. HE 700, 750 10 

2. Computer Science 20 

To be developed 20 

3. Education 20 

a. EDN 741 5 

b. EDN 732 or EDU 665 5 

c. EDU 731,750 10 

4. Administration 20 

a. BAD 661, 662 10 

b. BAD 665, 750 10 

5. Public Policy 20 

a. Three courses from: POS 
601,603,618, 705 15 

b. POS 750 _5 

TOTAL 60 

OFFERINGS 

Health Education Offerings 

HE 500— Marketing Health— An 
Interdisciplinary Approach (5-0-5) 

From the point of view of social scientists 
and business and health professionals, the sel- 
ling of health using educational techniques is 
undertaken. The utilization of concepts of 
health into lifestyle is addressed. The Human 
Development model is used. 

HE 650— Counseling and Health 
Care: Topics in Health Science and Devel- 
opmental Crisis (5-0-5) 

Coping mechanisms appropriate to recur- 



ring problems in healthy living and develop- 
mental crises are elaborated. Using noninva- 
sive counseling techniques, these mechanisms 
are offered for incorporation into lifestyles. 

HE 700— Selected Topics in Health Educa- 
tion (5-0-5) 

Psycho-social, political and economical bar- 
riers to healthy living are identified and attempts 
to overcome them made. Topics are selected 
on the basis of contemporaneity, persistence, 
and impact. 

HE 750— Practicum (1-8-5) 

The student is afforded the opportunity to 
synthesize and apply concepts of healthy liv- 
ing while involved in the health education of a 
selected group of individuals. 

Health Science Offerings 

HS 500— The Health-Illness Continua 
(5-0-5) 

Health and Illness are viewed not as ends of 
one continuum, but as two discrete continua. 
The course will focus on enhancement of health 
and elimination of illness/injury— as a function 
of lifestyle, and be taught from the perspective 
of "Human Development". 

HS 550— Topics in Community Health 
(5-0-5) 

Contemporary problems and issues regard- 
ing the enhancement of health and the elimi- 
nation of illness/injury. Lifestyles and socio- 
political factors relative to optional health per 
age and groupings will be emphasized. 

HS 660— Selected Topics in Illness/Injury 
and Rehabilitation— An Interdisciplinary 
Approach (5-0-5) 

Contemporary problems of Illness/Injury 
(e.g., hypertension, stroke, accidents, carci- 
noma, substance/nutrition abuse), their ther- 
apeutic interventions, and their rehabilitation 
regimens are scrutinized. The Human Devel- 
opment model will be utilized. 

HS 670— Selected Topics in Health— An 
Interdisciplinary Approach (5-0-5) 

A discussion of the most recent findings 
which enhance health, and the incorporation 
of their findings into a lifestyle. Reduction of 
stress, exercise, nutrition, interpersonal rela- 
tionships and other topics will be taken from 
the Human Development model. 

HS 700— Political Sociology of Health Care: 
The Consumer, The Provider, and State, 
Local, Federal Policies (5-0-5) 

An examination of the economic/political/- 



GRADUATE FACULTY ROSTER 



203 



social milieu in which health care exists Con- 
straints and demands of directing mores and 
legislation and their influences on lifestyles 
are identified and discussed 

HS 790, 791— Practicum I & II (1-8-5) 

A two-quarter course giving the student 
opportunity to specialize or to become knowl- 
edgeable in a health, therapeutic, rehabilita- 
tion setting, or combination thereof HS 690 is 
prerequisite to HS 691 

HS 795— Thesis (0-V-10) 



Graduate Faculty Roster 



Adams, Joseph 
Agyekum, Stephen 
Arens, Olavi 
Babits, Lawrence 
Battiste, Bettye Ann 
Beumer, Ronald 
Brewer, John 
Brooks, S. Kent 
Brown, Hugh 
Burgess, Clifford 
Burnett, Robert 
Cochran, John 
Coyle, William 
Cram, Bradford 
Cyphert, Daniel 
Duncan, John 
Ealy, Steven 
Easterling, William 
Galloway, Herbert 
Gross, Jimmie 
Guillou, Laurent 
Hansen, John 
Harbin, Mickie 
Harris, Henry 



Kilhefner, Dale 
Killonn, Joseph 
Lanier, Osmos 
Lawson, Cornelia 
Leska, Charles 
Magnus, Robert 
McCarthy, John 
Megathhn, William 
Menzel, George 
Munson, Richard 
Murphy, Dennis 
Nash, Charles 
Newberry, S. Lloyd 
Newman, John 
Noble, David 
Parsons, Dennis 
Patterson, Robert 
Pendexter, Hugh 
Pingel, Allen 
Pruden, George 
Repella, James 
Rhee, Steve 
Richters, Stephen 
Robbins, Paul 
Robinson, Aurelia 
Shipley, Charles 
Sims, Roy 

Stephens, Jacqueline 
Stevens, Linda 
Stokes, William 
Stone, Janet 
Stratton, Cedric 
Strozier, Robert 
Tapp, Lawrence 
Thomas, Claudia 
Thome, Francis 
Ward, Paul 
Warlick, Roger 
Whiten, Morris 

Employment dates and degrees earned for 
each of these faculty are given in the under- 
graduate section of this catalog. 



204 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Undergraduate Index 



Academic Progress 

Academic Standing 

Accelerated Admission Program . . . 

Accreditations 

Administrative Officers 

Admissions 

Accelerated Program 

Conditional 

Early 

Foreign Students 

General Information 

Readmission 

Regular 

Transfer Applicants 

Transient Students 

Veterans 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Admission Requirements to Specific 
Programs 

Dental Hygiene 

Dental Hygiene Education 

Fine Arts 

Health Information Management . 

Health Science 

Medical Technology 

Nursing (Associate) 

Nursing (Baccalaureate) 

Radiologic Technologies 

Respiratory Therapy 

Teacher Education 

Advanced Placement 

Advisement 

Alumni Activities 

Application Fee 

Arts and Sciences (School of) 

Associate Degree General 

Requirements 

Athletics 

Attendance 

Auditing 



Baccalaureate Degree General 

Requirements 

Biology Department 



Calendar (Academic) 

Chemistry Department . . . 
Classification of Students 



32 Computer Services 35 

1 1 Continuing Education 7 

1 1 Core Curriculum 36 

. 6 Counseling 33 

. 4 Course Offerings 

. 8 American Civilization 85 

1 1 Accounting (SSC) 123 

, . 9 Anthropology 99 

,11 Art 62 

, 1 2 Astronomy 58 

. 8 Biology 51 

11 Botany 53 

. 9 Business Administration (SSC) 1 23 

I Business Education (SSC) 123 

I I Chemistry 56 

1 2 Computer Science 96 

12 Criminal Justice 133 

Dental Hygiene 1 36 

1 2 Developmental Studies 43 

, 1 4 Drama/Speech 85 

, 1 5 Economics 72. 1 23 

, 12 Education 

, 1 6 Business 123 

, 17 EDN (Early Elementary and 

, 1 8 Middle School) 1 05 

, 1 2 EDU (Secondary) 119 

, 1 3 Exceptional Children 120 

, 1 7 Library Media/Science 121 

, 1 6 English 86 

1 02 Entomology 53 

, . 9 Film 88 

, 19 French 88 

, 36 Geography 72 

, 26 Geology 58 

. 48 German 89 

Health Education 1 42 

. 41 Health Information Management 139 

, 34 Health Science 141 

. 21 History 73 

, 22 Industrial Arts Education (SSC) 1 23 

Journalism 90 

Latin 89 

Library Media 121 

Linguistics 90 

. 41 Mathematics 93 

. 50 Medical Technology 1 43 

Meteorology 58 

Military Science 46 

Museum Preservation Studies 77 

, . 4 Music 64 

. 55 Nursing 

. 20 Associate Degree (NUR) 1 27 



This index applies to only the undergraduate section of this catalog. A separate graduate index applies to the graduate 
portion of this catalog 



UNDERGRADUATE INDEX 



205 



Baccalaureate Degree (BSN) 1 30 

Oceanography 58 

Office Administration (SSC) 124 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 10/ 

Physical Science 

Physics 

Political Science 79 

Psychology 99 

Public Administration 79 

Radiologic Technologies 146 

Reading Skills 44 

Respiratory Therapy 1 48 

Russian 89 

Social Work 151 

Sociology 152 

Spanish 89 

Study Techniques 44 

Trade and Industrial Education 

(SSC) 125 

Zoology 53 

bourses 

Auditing 22 

Course Load 20 

Dropping 22 

Lettering System for 42 

Numbering System for 42 

Overload 20 

Repeating 22 

Withdrawing from College 22 

Credit by Examination 9 

Criminal Justice Department 131 

Dean's List 21 

Degree Programs (Categories) 6 

Cooperative 8 

Dual-Degree 7 

Four-Year 7 

Joint Continuing Education Center 7 

Pre-Professional 7 

Two-Year 6 

Degree Programs (Requirements of) 1 9, 36 

)ental Hygiene Department 1 35 

Development Activities 35 

Developmental Studies Department 43 

Dismissal (Academic) 21 

acuity Roster 1 53 

ees 26 

inancial Aid 29 

inancial Obligations 28 

me Arts Department 60 

oreign Students 12 



General Studies 46 

Government Benefits 31 

Graduate Catalog Hj i 



Health Information Management 

Program 138 

Health Science Program 1 40 

History and Political Science 

Department 68 

History of the College 6 

Honor Code 23 

Honors 21 

Housing 34 

Human Services (School of) 1 25 

Intramurals 34 

Joint Continuing Education Center 7 



Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 

Arts Department 82 

Lettering System for Courses 42 

Library Media Program 119 

Library Services 35 



Mathematics and Computer Science 

Department 91 

Mathematics and English Placement 

Tests 41 

Medical Technology Program 1 43 

Military Science Program 44 

Naval Science Program 47 

Notice of Fee Change 29 

Numbering System for Courses 42 

Nursing Department (Associate) 1 26 

Nursing Department (Baccalaureate) 128 

Orientation 33 



his index applies to only the undergraduate section of this catalog. A separate graduate index applies to the graduate 
ortion of this catalog. 



206 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Physical Education Department 1 07 

Physical Education Requirements 41 

Placement Services 33 

Placement Tests (English and 

Mathematics 41 

Probation (Academic) 21 

Psychology Department 98 

Purpose of the College 6 

Radiologic Technologies Program 1 44 

Refunds 28 

Regents' Testing Policy 39 

Regents' Testing Program 39 

Registration 

Late Fee 28 

Reports and Grades 21 

Residency Reclassification 27 

Residency Requirements 26 

Respiratory Therapy Department 1 47 

Scholarships 32 

Secondary Education Department 111 

Social Work and Sociology Program 1 50 

Student 

Activities 32 

Cooperative Program 8 

Government 34 

Organizations 34 

Publications 34 

Study Load 20 

Teacher Education Programs 1 02 

Testing 33 

English and Mathematics 

Placement Tests 41 

Exit Examinations 40 

Regents' Testing Policy 39 

Services 33 

Transfer Students 

Financial Aid 30 

Requirements of Applicants 10 

Transient Students 11 



Veterans 

Admissions 

Financial Aid 

Vocational Rehabilitation . 

Withdrawing from College 
Writing Center 



This index applies to only the undergraduate section of this catalog A separate graduate index applies to the gradua 
portion of this catalog 



GRADUATE INDEX 



207 



Graduate Index 



Academic Probation and Standing 1 69 

nic Regulations 167 

trative Withdrawals 1 70 

Admission Requirements to Specific 

Programs 1 66 

Admissions 1 63 

nent 167 

Application Fee 1 70 



3iology Department 173 

3usmess Education Program 1 87 



Elementary Education Department 1 88 



Faculty Roster 203 

Fees 1 70 

Financial Aid 171 

Financial Obligations 171 

Foreign Student Advisement 1 68 



General Degree Requirements 1 72 

Graduate Council 1 62 



Calendar (Academic) 4 

CATES Courses 1 70 

Chemistry and Physics Department 1 75 

Course Eligibility 1 69 

Course Offerings 

Astronomy 1 76 

Biology 1 73 

Botany 173 

Business Education 1 88 

Chemistry 1 75 

Criminal Justice 200 

Drama/Speech 1 84 

Education 

Business Education 1 88 

Early Elementary Education 1 91 

EDN Classes 1 90 

EDU Classes 1 96 

Exceptional Children (EXC) 1 98 

Physical Education 1 93 

: English 184 

Film 1 84 

Geology 1 76 

Health Education 202 

Health Science 202 

History 179 

Mathematics 1 86 

Meteorology 1 76 

Museum Preservation Studies 1 81 

Oceanography 1 76 

Physical Science 1 76 

Physics 176 

Political Science 1 81 

Public Administration 1 81 

Zoology 1 73 

bourses 

Adding 169 

CATES 170 

Dropping 1 69 

Load Limitation 1 69 

Withdrawal from 1 69 

Criminal Justice Department 200 



Health Science Program 

History and Political Science 

Department 

History and Purpose of the College 
Honor Code 



201 

176 
162 
170 



Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 
Arts Department 



183 



Marine Science Center Offerings 

Biology Department 

Chemistry and Physics Department 
Mathematics and Computer Science 

Department 

MEd. Programs 

Certification 

Non-certification 

Notice of Fee Change 



174 
176 

185 

172 
172 
171 



Physical Education Department 1 92 



Refunds 

Registration 

Reports and Grades 

Residency Requirements, 



171 

168 
168 
171 



Science Education Degree Programs 1 94 

Second Masters 1 72 

Secondary and Special Education 
Department 1 95 



)egree Applications 1 72 

)egree Candidacy 171 

)egree Programs 163 

)egree Requirements 171 

)epartmental Coordinators 1 62 

• 



Thirty-Hour Plan 1 72 

Time Limitation 171 

Transcripts 171 

Transfer of Credits 1 68 



ms index applies to only the graduate section of this catalog. A separate undergraduate index applies to the undergraduate 
prtion of this catalog. 



208 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Veterans Benefits 171 



Withdrawals (Administrative) 1 70 



This index applies to only the graduate section of this catalog A separate undergraduate index applies to the undergradi 
portion of this catalog 




L Hiiiiiiiitratioa 
President 

Vice Pres., Dean of Faculty 
Vice Pres. , Bus. & Finance 
Dean, Student Affairs 
Ass't to the President 
Registrar 

Director of Admissions 
Director of Public Info. 
Alumni Secretary 
Counsel ing/Placement 
Student Financial Aid 
Veterans' Affairs 

ILm Lfcrary 
A-V Services 



Dean, School of Arts & Sci. 
Language & Literature Dept. 
History & Pol i . Sci . Dept. 

4. Jookms HjII 

Office of Computer Services 
Auditorium 

5. Sc»nc« Kail 

Math & Computer Sci. Dept. 
Biology Department 
Physics Lab 
a. Health & Physical Education Building 

Gym & Pool 

P.E. 4 Athletics Dept. 
Athletic Director 
7. riant Oporat ions Building 

Maintenance Shop 
Central Stores 
Print Shop 
Ma i 1 Room 
I M.C.C. Annex 
Bookstore 
Clinic 
Sociology/Soc. Wk. Program 



S. Solms Hall 

Chemistry & Physics Dept. 
SDecial Studies 

10. V.c tor Hall 

Psychology Dept. 
School of Education 
Dean, School of Education 

11. Memorial College Center 

Director of Student Activities 

Cafeteria 

Dining Rooms, Pres. & Faculty 

Alumni Lounge 

Offices: 

Student Government 

Student Newspaper 

Annual 

Sororities 

Army ROTC 

12. Fin* Arts Cantor 

Fine Arts Department 
Community Services 
Dean, Community Services 
Med. Coll. of Ga., Sav'h Satellite 
Audi torium 
11 Human Services Building 
Dental Hygiene Dept. 

A. D. Nursing Dept. 

B. S. Nursing Dept. 
Criminal Justice Dept. 
Respiratory Therapy Program 
Medical Record Tech. Program 
Lecture Hall 

Dean, School of Human Services 
Cont. Ed. Coord., Human Serv. 

14. Student * Visitor Parking 

15. Tennis Courts 

16. Baseball * Intramural Fit W 



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